October 10th

On 10th October 1536, a large crowd of armed men from Holderness supporting the Pilgrimage of Grace met on Beverley Westwood and Sutton Ings and chose captains.

On 10th October 1596, the Howden churchwardens gave 8d to Oswald Metcalfe, a poor man, licensed by My Lord Grace and the Council (i.e. given licence to beg while on his way to his home parish).

On 10th October 1918, former Reckitt’s employee gunner George Henry Saul, 26, died of wounds while serving with the Royal Garrison Artillery. Buried Etaples, France.

Pilgr Grace

October 6th

site of Haltemprice Priory

On 6th October 1515, the Sheriff of Hull, Mr Mattison and 200 citizens fought the monks of Haltemprice Priory and threatened to pull down the monastery, over a dispute concerning jurisdiction over Wolfreton and Willerby, and fresh water supplies. Peace was restored by the Mayor of Hull, George Mattison and the issue was eventually resolved in the Star Chamber. One of many incidents in Hull’s ‘water wars’. photo shows site of the monastery.

On 6th October 1613, an enquiry determined that a chantry dedicated to St Mary, and a chaplain to celebrate daily services there, had been paid for by 6 1/4 acres of land, 10 messuages and 3 tofts, given to the town of Hedon by John de Burton and Henry Maupas. Chantries were abolished by Edward VI, along with other signs of Catholicism.

On 6th October 1670, Ann Barone was fined in the Patrington manor court for not making bread according to the assize – i.e. not the regulation size, weight etc.

On 6th October 1748, Mary Jackson, tenant farmer of Everingham, lost 36 of her 45 cattle to rinderpest, the cattle plague then affecting much of the East Riding.

On 6th October 1850, Hedon solicitor James Iveson, died after a long career controlling the political life of Hedon, a Rotten Borough described as ‘Lawyer-ridden’. He was also Town clerk, Mayor, land agent, and steward on behalf of the Constables of the Holderness Seigniory. The Iveson dynasty was involved in land enclosures, surveying and other profitable work. James was renowned for rudeness. Part of an ultra conservative council which for years resisted public health improvements. Collector of architectural remains from demolished churches. Engaged for some 20 years of protracted negotiation with Trinity House over Spurn Point.  portrait in Hedon Town Hall

On 6th October 1890, Chas Collier, aged 17 years, former pupil of Hull Trinity House School, died of typhoid fever in the Barque Miltiades off the west coast of Africa.

James Iveson, Hedon Town Clerk

October 4th

On 4th October 1253, heavy flooding in Holderness resulted from a dry year and heavy rain. The River Hull changed its course.

On 4th October 1541, the Privy Council of England again sat in Hull.

On 4th October 1642, Capt John Hotham, after the Yorkshire Treaty of Neutrality was signed, began to return from Doncaster to Hull. The treaty was rejected by Parliament, and he detoured and captured Cawood Castle for Parliament, the Archbishop having fled.

On 4th October 1643, 400 Parliamentary soldiers went out of the besieged town of Hull and destroyed the Royalist forts in Sculcoates and Derringham Bank.

On 4th October 1785, Thomas Jackson of Blackfriargate, Hull, complained to the Mayor and corporation about nuisance caused by one of the town waites (official musicians) holding dancing lessons in Hales Entry.

On 4th October 1909, Hornsea Urban District Council conducted a poll of ratepayers, who voted to allow the council to enclose the Promenade Gardens and charge for admission.

On 4th October 1952, ship’s cook Cyril Brown, 44, and 19 shipmates were lost when Hull trawler Norman was wrecked. The sole survivor was Norman Spencer, 19. see Pathe news https://www.britishpathe.com/video/one-survivor-aka-trawler-disaster

 

August 22nd

On 22nd August, 1138, William le Gros, Earl of Albemarle and Lord of Holderness, was made Earl of York, in recognition of his prowess in the Battle of the Standard at Cowton Moor, Northallerton. The 4 standards of St John of Beverley, St Peter of York, St Cuthbert of Durham, and St Wilfred of Ripon, were used as a rallying point for the English against the Scots. The East Riding contingent included a Percy and a de Stuteville. (and see 20.8)

On 22nd August 1572, Thomas Percy, 7thEarl of Northumberland, was executed at York for treason, as leader of the Rising of the North. He was offered mercy if he renounced Catholicism, and refused.  Beatified by the Catholic church. (b 1528, probably in  Leconfield)

On 22nd August 1711, James Rand left £160 in his will for ‘the poor and needful of Preston’. Rands Estate in the village is named for him.

On 22nd August 1917, a bomb from a German Zeppelin destroyed the Primitive Methodist chapel, Baxtergate, Hedon.

On 22nd August 1918, Alfred Buchanan Cheetham of Bean Street, Hull, was killed when the SS Prunelle was torpedoed in the North Sea by a German U-boat. He took part in 3 Polar expeditions, and spent a total of 6 years in the Antarctic, with both Scott and Shackleton. Awarded the Silver Polar Medal clasp, he claimed to have crossed the Antarctic Circle 14 times. Cape Cheetham is named for him. (b 6.5.1867 Liverpool)

On 22nd August 1925, Robin Skelton died aged 72 in victoria, Canada. Poet, literary editor, professor and author of books on wicca. Born in Easington 12.10.1925

 

robin skelton

August20th

wm le grosOn 20th August 1179, William le Gros, Count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness, died aged 64 after 50 years as Count. As Earl of York, the most powerful man in the north of England during the Anarchy, a soldier, and founder of religious houses, including Meaux Abbey, and Newton Grange leper hospital.

On 20th August 1526, John Dove, a labourer from Burstwick, and William Bayne, a tallow chandler from Withernwick, separately arrived and claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt. On a busy day at the sanctuary, a 3rddebtor arrived from Wakefield.

On 20th August 1535, Richard Browne, vicar of North Cave, confessed to heresy by preaching Lutheranism; he was absolved, after suspension for 2 months.

 

August 2nd

On 2nd August 1806, Capt Welburn, James Simon, ship’s surgeon, and crew of Hull whaler Blenheim were returning from the Davis Straits when the ship was taken by 2 French frigates, L’Syrene and Le Revenge. The Blenheim was burnt, its crew landed at Pampoule near St Malo, and conveyed to Arras where they were imprisoned. They were later moved to other prisons, and only released in 1814, after years of privation and misery, when the allies entered Paris. Dr Simon was subsequently in practice in Aldborough, Holderness where he died in 1845.

On 2nd August 1860, Hedon Magdalen Fair was finally abolished; in the latter years the owner of the field had to persuade, or bribe, those who wished to attend the fair not to meet there. The event had included a market, music, games, sports, juggling, fire-eaters, and badger baiting.

On 2nd August 1913, Charles William Loten and Terence Charles Carroll, 18, died at Hornsea whilst trying to save a child from drowning. A memorial brass in Hornsea church was paid for by public subscription.

On 2nd August 1916, Joseph Bennett, 17,  died in Hull from bubonic plague. photo shows his memorial in the columbarium, Hedon Road.

plague victim.JPG

July 6th

On 6th July 1381, William Haldene of Beverley had his brains literally knocked out by John Erghom and others, with a pole-axe, 2 battle-axes, 6 swords, 2 forks and other weapons, before his body was thrown into the beck in Walker Lane.

On 6th July 1382, Sir Michael de la Pole leased to John de Hedersee and John of Dimlington land in Myton which included arable land, pasture and at least 30 acres of meadow, with houses, sheepfolds, 600 sheep and 160 lambs. Myton was clearly very rural then.

On 6th July 1537, the body of Sir Robert Constable of Flamborough was displayed on Beverley Gate, Hull, after he was hanged for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace, despite having been pardoned the previous year.

On 6th July 1538, Hull agreed to give a place in the Charterhouse to the wife of a blind man named Ralph, as his carer during his lifetime, taking up a place normally reserved for a man.

On 6th July 1642, Robert & Christopher Hildyard of Winestead, Francis Cobbe of Ottringham, and 300 other Holderness people met King Charles I at Keyingham and handed him a petition against Sir John Hotham’s actions in flooding farmland and taking livestock into Hull. The King was visiting The Providence, which had landed arms from Holland. The King sympathised, but said he could do nothing except raise troops, as he had no power to control Hotham.

On 6th July 1644, the Hull Committee of Sequestrations formally adjudged alderman James Watkinson a delinquent, 2 years after he left Hull to join the Royalist army, and they ordered that his post as alderman be filled by election.

On 6th July 1901, G.E. Conrad Naewiger complained in a letter to the Hull Daily Mail of the lack of steps to Aldbrough beach, a popular destination for works outings from Hull. photo shows Aldbrough cliff.

On 6th July 1910, Arthur Geoffrey Dickens was born in Hull. Professor of History at the University of Hull, he was elected Fellow of the British Academy. Considered the leading historian of the Reformation of his time. Awarded the Order of Merit by the German Government. (died 31.7.2001)

On 6th July 1921, Tilworth Grange was opened to ‘Female mental defectives’ (people with learning disabilities), the first provision in Hull for people who previously were sent to institutions in Bristol, Chesterfield and Ormskirk. Winestead Hall was bought in 1931 for men.

 

erosion aldboro.JPG

May 25th

On 25th May 1537, Dr James Cockerell, Prior of Guisborough, was hanged, drawn and quartered for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace; he was vicar of Hessle from 1509-1519.

On 25th May 1693, Robert Jackson, under-keeper of the lighthouse at Spurn, locked himself in the lighthouse and secured the door when told a party of armed employees of Lord Dunbar (Lord of Holderness) were on their way to claim ownership. They undermined the walls and took Jackson prisoner to York Castle.

On 25th May 1770, the Driffield Canal Commissioners fully opened the new Driffield Canal, which gave the merchants of this then small hamlet access to the River Hull and the sea. Between 1784 and 1799, 6 warehouses were built at River Head, and new factories and cargo vessels used the canal. photo shows the canal today

On 25th May 1815, Parliament passed an Act to create the Pocklington Canal. Most of the subscribers were titled and/or landed gentry, but among those who bought shares at £100 were innkeepers, a blacksmith, saddler, grocer, and 4 single women (spinsters or widows).

On 25th May 1826, Mr Brown made a balloon ascent from Mr Thompson’s yard, Beverley, which was described as ‘splendid’. Winds took the balloon south west where it crash landed on the moors between Thorne and Crowle, Mr Brown sustaining an injury to his spine. He was able to travel to Sheffield for another balloon trip.

Driffield Canal

May 23rd

On 23rd May 1260, William de Forz III, count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, died, aged about 45. He gave away his claim to the earldom of Chester in return for 2 small manors, including Driffield. Acted as ambassador for Henry III to Scotland and France, and was a member of the Council of Fifteen, advising the King on government matters. Gave land to Meaux Abbey on ‘the island called Ravenser Odd in the Humber’. His heir, Thomas, was 6 and he and the count’s lands were put into the King’s care.

On 23rd May 1510, Howden tiler Robert Colstayne claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for ‘the security of his body’; the register gives no detail of who was pursuing him, or why.

On 23rd May 1596, Howden churchwardens gave 6d to 2 poor men (presumably travelling through on their way to their home parish).

On 23rd May 1642, Hull Governor Sir John Hotham called a meeting of ‘knights and gentlemen’ to give a ‘learned speech’ explaining why he refused to allow King Charles into the town. This was part of the ‘paper war’ between the King and Parliament.

On 23rd May 1822, Hull merchant Joseph R. Pease attended a public meeting for the Relief of the Suffering Irish, due to famine in the West. He reported it thinly attended.

On 23rd May 1853, a Government enquiry into electoral corruption was opened at the Mansion House, Hull.  This followed a petition from the Conservative Party objecting to the election of James Clay and Viscount Goderich as MPs for Hull in the previous year. Hull was unrepresented in Parliament for almost 2 years; the Commission sat for 57 days and produced a report weighing over 11 tons and costing £5,000. (and see 16.8)

On 23rd May 1904, on Whit Monday, the Holderness Polo club held a polo match which attracted 6,000 spectators. This was held at the Polo Ground, Westbourne Avenue, Hull (modern Westbourne Ave West to Perth St West)The last matches were played in 1907.

On 23rd May 1907, the Mayoress of Hull opened a new military rifle range at Rolston, for use by Militia, Volunteers and Yeomanry. The land was leased from Rolston Hall.  below – Rolston Hall.

On 23rd May 1911, a fire began in the kitchen chimney of Sledmere House, which 24 hours later had destroyed the whole house. Fire engines from Driffield and Malton attended. There were no injuries.

 

 

Rolston Hall.jpg