December 26th

On 26th December 1220, William de Forz II, Count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness was with King Henry III at the Royal court at Oxford; the King made an appointment William hoped to get; disappointed, he left Oxford for Lincolnshire, and began a rebellion, known as the war of Bytham.

On 26th December 1489, George Gusterd, weaver of Bishop Burton, claimed sanctuary at Beverley for the murder of a servant of Edward Barnaby, a gentleman. He did not know the servant’s name.

On 26th December 1495, William Middleton was threatened with a pole-axe by John of Cottingham, John of Wawne, Thomas Warde, Robert Bate, and (- ) Mykill, and was so afraid for his life that he took sanctuary in Wawne church and stayed there for 10 hours, afterwards leaving the area. He applied to the Chancery Court for leave to prosecute his attackers, but the outcome is not recorded.

On 26th December 1645, Rev Nicholas Osgodby was reported to be using the forbidden Prayer Book in secret.

On 26th December 1750, the chapter house roof of Howden church collapsed, to join the rubble of the chancel which had collapsed in 1696.

On 26th December 1890, residents of Hornsea had a fair on the frozen surface of the Mere, and a sheep was roasted on the ice.

On 26th December 1955, Roy Francis played his last game after 6 years with Hull FC, and became UK’s first black professional sporting coach, and team manager 1971 to 1973.

roy-francis

December 17th

On 17th December 1216, William de Forz was given as a hostage with his mother Aveline to the new King Henry III when his father, William de Forz II, count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, supported the barons. Presumably this was to assure the king of his loyalty, as he had been a supporter of King John.

On 17th December 1965, North Sea Ferries began operating a ferry service from Hull to Rotterdam, for freight vehicles and private cars. MV Norwave’s maiden voyage saw a force 10 gale, which caused some trailers to break free of their shackles, but damage was minimal. The sister ship Norwind joined the service in March 1966.

Norwave

December 8th

turkey lectern3.JPG

 

On 8th December 1536, armed men from Holderness who had seized Hull in the Pilgrimage of Grace restored the town to the Mayor and dispersed.

On 8th December 1598, William Strickland died in Boynton. When young, he had travelled to America on voyages of exploration with Sebastian Cabot, and is credited with introducing the turkey to England. Later became a prominent Puritan MP. photo shows the Turkey Lectern in Boynton church.

On 8th December 1629, George Acklam of Bewholme died aged 64, and left £5 to Hornsea church to distribute to the poor every year on Maundy Thursday ‘forever’.

On 8th December 1637, Hull Mayor John Ramsden was buried; he died of plague. Andrew Marvell gave the funeral oration. His son, also John Ramsden, became Hull MP. This outbreak of plague in Hull killed over 2,500 people, and many more left the town. 

On 8th December 1879, William Walden, engineer and brewer, died aged 62. In a time when Hull was beset with cholera, he offered to supply Hull with clean water from Springhead at the rate of 5m gallons of water per day, at a fee of £500, or if he failed, be paid nothing. He succeeded. He is buried in Hull General Cemetery.

Springhead bore hole

November 30th

On 30th November 1219, William de Forz II, count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness, was declared a rebel and excommunicated for offences against the Crown and the sheriffs of 6 counties were instructed not to give him any help; he had held onto castles after being ordered to restore them to their owners.

On 30th November 1280, the residents of Hedon petitioned government to fix their tax (fee farm) as they were ‘few and poor’ and competition from Ravenserod and Hull were increasing from day to day. The port was firmly in decline. Hedon ship motif can be found in St Augustine’s church.

Hedon ship, St Augustine's

On 30th November 1587, Alexander Crowe, Catholic priest, aged approx 34, was executed in York. Born in Howden, worked as a shoemaker and travelled to Douai; ordained at Rheims 1583. Captured at South Duffield while baptising the baby of Cecily Garnett.

On 30th November 1644, Sir John Hotham began his trial for treason at the Guildhall, London.

On 30th November 1832, Henry John Shepherd, attorney and JP, of Beverley, went bankrupt, having speculated in building projects; his creditors were reported to include mainly individuals who had given him money for investment with no security; the bankruptcy register describes him as ‘dealer and chapman’. Shepherd was again practising as a solicitor in 1833.

 

November 10th

On 10th November 1274, Aveline de Forz, aged 10, was married to Edmund Crouchback, 2nd son of Henry III.  Countess of Aumale and Lord of Holderness in her own right, and Countess of Lancaster by marriage.  She died childless at age 15 and is buried in Westminster Abbey. The Lordship of Holderness passed to the Crown. Born Burstwick 20.1.1259

On 10th November 1293, Countess Isabella de Forz, widow of William de Forz III died, having outlived her husband and all her children, including Aveline above. A legend relates that she came across a poor man carrying a basket containing what he said were puppies, but which turned out to be seven of his children that he was going to drown because he could not afford to keep them. After severely upbraiding him for his lack of morality, Isabella adopted the children and ensured that they were looked after and well educated until their adulthood when she found employment for all of them.

On 10th November 1518, Sir Marmaduke Constable of Flamborough (known as Little Sir Marmaduke). Died after swallowing a frog (some say toad) while drinking a glass of water. Knighted for military service including Flodden a letter of thanks from Henry VIII is displayed, in Wassand Hall. photo shows his tomb in Flambrough church. & see 9.9

On 10th November 1609, Sir George Wharton, who was raised at Londesborough, died in a duel in Islington with his good friend Sir James Stuart, the King’s godson, who also died. The event was commemorated by Sir Walter Scott in his ‘Minstrelsy of the Scottish borders’. (b1583)

On 10th November 1678, Capt Towes (or Towers or Towle) of the Hull ship Shield landed settlers at Burlington, New Jersey. Many were Quakers, who settled at Burlington, Salem and other places. One of the passengers was Mr Barnes, a merchant from Hull.

Little Sir Maramaduke Constable's tomb

November 9th

On 9th November 1309, King Edward II visited his Royal park in Burstwick, his main residence in the north.  Piers Gaveston was Lord of Holderness.

On 9th November 1487, John de la Pole senior, Duke of Suffolk, was stripped of most of his property and estates as a result of his son’s rebellion (the Earl of Lincoln) in support of Lambert Simnel.

On 9th November 1488, John Fernell, yeoman, of Asselby, killed Thomas Rodley with a staff, and then made his way to Beverley, where on 17.11 he claimed the sanctuary of the church of St John, and admitted the homicide.

On 9th November 1906, Capt Stensen and 5 crew of a Norwegian schooner carrying timber stranded at Withernsea in a gale. There were no casualties.

On 9th November 1916, Private Herbert Neal, 24, former Reckitt’s employee in the lead mill was killed in action with the East Yorkshire Regiment and is buried in Bazentin-le-petit, Somme, France. 2 of his brothers also served in the war, and only 1 survived to return home to Church St, Hull.

On 9th November 1923, Sir Henry Wood, originator of the Proms, made his first appearance as conductor of the Hull Philharmonic Orchestra, originally for one concert only. He stayed for 15 years, travelling from London to work with amateur musicians for a considerably reduced fee. An earlier contact with Hull was 1906 when Ethel Leginska performed for him in London.

Sir Henry Wood

October 16th

john de sutton

 

On 16th October 1312, John de Sutton of Sutton-on-Hull was listed with other followers of the Earl of Lancaster as pardoned for his part in the death of Piers Gaveston, King Edward II’s favourite and Lord of Holderness. photo of Sutton church

On 16th Ocotber 1617, John Gildas confessed to the Patrington Manor Court that he had 3 times stolen barley and beans from Mr Hall’s (the rector) tithe barn.

On 16th October 1763, Ann Chameron was buried in Hutton with no ceremony, as she was a Catholic. Burial by a Catholic priest would have incurred a £20 fine.

On 16th October 1939, New Theatre (Hull) Limited, Kingston Square, opened with a production of “Me and my Girl’ by Noel Gay.

 

 

October 15th

On 15th October 1536, Hull besieged by troops of local men, from of Holderness, Cottingham, Beverley and Hullshire supporting the Pilgrimage of Grace.  William Stapleton reported he had trouble restraining the Beverley men under his command from setting fire to shipping in Hull haven. He sentenced 2 ‘unmanageable’ followers to death, but reprieved both after inflicting one with the punishment of being towed behind a boat by a rope attached to his waist.

Pilgr Grace

October 12th

On 12th October 1536, 9,000 armed men from across East Yorkshire mustered on Market Weighton Hill as part of the Pilgrimage of Grace. Robert Aske led one group to York via Pocklington, and William Stapleton led a march on Hull, besieged it and captured it for the rebels. Holderness gentry Sir John Constable, Sir Wm Constable and Sir Ralph Ellerker had taken refuge in the town from the revolt.

On 12th October 1643, the Earl of Newcastle abandoned the 2ndsiege of Hull after 5 weeks and withdrew Royalist forces to York. To prevent pursuit, the Royalists destroyed bridges and roads and cut the banks of waterways as they retreated. The date was observed as a day of public thanksgiving in Hull until the Restoration.

On 12th October 1697, Robert Pattinson, Humber pilot, was fined 30shillings for damaging the ‘dolphin’ at the entrance to the River Hull while handling a vessel entering the Haven.

On 12th October 1767, Beverley gentleman John Courtney reported in his diary seeing a firework display for the first time, in the Market Place, paid for by subscription.

On 12th October 1896, at Hull Fair, one of the attrractions was the first showing in Hull of moving pictures, only 8 months after Louis Lumiere’s first performance, included scenes of Whitefriargate, the W’force Monument, the Corporation Pier, the Humber Ferry.

On 12th October 1933, Louis Armstrong performed at Beverley Road Baths, Hull, during his European Tour.

 

louis armstrong

October 11th

ON 11th October 1536, Marmaduke Thomson, vicar of Preston, rang the church bell and called parishioners to meet at Nuthill, where he swore in local men to join the Pilgrimage of Grace. Around 300 Holderness men left to assemble at Sutton Ings. (& see 10.10)

On 11th October 1643, 1500 Parliamentary troops left the besieged town of Hull and after 2 attempts and many hours’ fighting, drove the Royalists out of all their positions around the town.

On 11th October 1782, Rev George Lambert described Hull Fair as ‘A season for the amusement of children and the gratification of gluttony’.

On 11th October 1929, Mrs Edith Robson officially opened Hedon Road Maternity Hospital, the successor to the free maternity home for poor mothers, which she gave as a gift, fully equipped, to Hull Corporation in 1915.

 

fair 07