March 6th

On 6th March 1851, two days of severe storms, coupled with high tides, caused several breaches in Spurn Point, and made the Low Light insecure. The lifeboat was damaged, and several of the crew’s cottages were flooded. The extraction of gravel was halted, but did not finally end for many years.

On 6th March 1862, Joseph Wildridge, aged 14, apprentice, was attacked by another apprentice, probably named William Webb, on board Hull fishing smack Fairy. He was  so severely injured that he had to be returned home by another vessel, and died on 9thApril. He was unable to report on the events leading up to his attack, and a court case failed to prove a case against his assailant, as the crew would not testify.

On 6th March 1883, a great storm affecting the whole of the East coast resulted in huge losses in the Hull fishing fleet. Accounts vary: up to 230 Hull fishermen and 32 fishing smacks are recorded as lost.

On 6th March 1916, Zeppelin L14, after attacking Hull, dropped bombs on Burstwick and Owstwick, with no further casualties, before passing out to sea.

On 6th March 1919, the RAF Squadron 248 at Hornsea Mere seaplane station disbanded. From August 1918, it flew coastal patrols with Short 184 and Fairey Hamble Baby floatplanes off the Yorkshire coast. photo shows a short 184

 

short-184

November 10th

On 10th November 1274, Aveline de Forz, aged 10, was married to Edmund Crouchback, 2nd son of Henry III.  Countess of Aumale and Lord of Holderness in her own right, and Countess of Lancaster by marriage.  She died childless at age 15 and is buried in Westminster Abbey. The Lordship of Holderness passed to the Crown. Born Burstwick 20.1.1259

On 10th November 1293, Countess Isabella de Forz, widow of William de Forz III died, having outlived her husband and all her children, including Aveline above. A legend relates that she came across a poor man carrying a basket containing what he said were puppies, but which turned out to be seven of his children that he was going to drown because he could not afford to keep them. After severely upbraiding him for his lack of morality, Isabella adopted the children and ensured that they were looked after and well educated until their adulthood when she found employment for all of them.

On 10th November 1518, Sir Marmaduke Constable of Flamborough (known as Little Sir Marmaduke). Died after swallowing a frog (some say toad) while drinking a glass of water. Knighted for military service including Flodden a letter of thanks from Henry VIII is displayed, in Wassand Hall. photo shows his tomb in Flambrough church. & see 9.9

On 10th November 1609, Sir George Wharton, who was raised at Londesborough, died in a duel in Islington with his good friend Sir James Stuart, the King’s godson, who also died. The event was commemorated by Sir Walter Scott in his ‘Minstrelsy of the Scottish borders’. (b1583)

On 10th November 1678, Capt Towes (or Towers or Towle) of the Hull ship Shield landed settlers at Burlington, New Jersey. Many were Quakers, who settled at Burlington, Salem and other places. One of the passengers was Mr Barnes, a merchant from Hull.

Little Sir Maramaduke Constable's tomb

November 9th

On 9th November 1309, King Edward II visited his Royal park in Burstwick, his main residence in the north.  Piers Gaveston was Lord of Holderness.

On 9th November 1487, John de la Pole senior, Duke of Suffolk, was stripped of most of his property and estates as a result of his son’s rebellion (the Earl of Lincoln) in support of Lambert Simnel.

On 9th November 1488, John Fernell, yeoman, of Asselby, killed Thomas Rodley with a staff, and then made his way to Beverley, where on 17.11 he claimed the sanctuary of the church of St John, and admitted the homicide.

On 9th November 1906, Capt Stensen and 5 crew of a Norwegian schooner carrying timber stranded at Withernsea in a gale. There were no casualties.

On 9th November 1916, Private Herbert Neal, 24, former Reckitt’s employee in the lead mill was killed in action with the East Yorkshire Regiment and is buried in Bazentin-le-petit, Somme, France. 2 of his brothers also served in the war, and only 1 survived to return home to Church St, Hull.

On 9th November 1923, Sir Henry Wood, originator of the Proms, made his first appearance as conductor of the Hull Philharmonic Orchestra, originally for one concert only. He stayed for 15 years, travelling from London to work with amateur musicians for a considerably reduced fee. An earlier contact with Hull was 1906 when Ethel Leginska performed for him in London.

Sir Henry Wood

October 3rd

On 3rd October 1667, Mark Turington, Peter Gorbut, Christopher Gray & Jane Sansbie were fined at Patrington for having bad fences or fences in bad repair.

On 3rd October 1810, Rev George Lambert of Hull wrote in his diary: ‘times never were more alarming than the present. Failure, bankruptcies and suicide are taking place every day, and public credit shaken to its foundation. No man knows today what will be his circumstances tomorrow’.

On 3rd October 1821, Dr Raffles preached to 600 people on board the Valiant in Queen’s Dock, Hull, a new floating chapel bought by The Port of Hull Society for the Religious Instruction of Seamen. It was used for 28 years until the vessel was leaking and abandoned in 1850.

On 3rd October 1884, Elsie March, sculptor, painter and metalworker, was born in Sutton (or Old Hall, Burstwick?), one of 8 artist siblings born to foreman seed crusher George Henry March. Moved to Battersea 1901. With 5 of her brothers, created the Canadian War memorial in Ottawa completed in 1938. see photo (d 1974, Kent)

On 3rd October 1898, Ernst Adolf Powolny opened a restaurant in King Edward Street which became a Hull institution, providing high class food in opulent surroundings, as well as tea dances and catering for civic events. Closed temporarily by a fire in 1934, it finally closed after being destroyed by the Blitz on 8.5.1941. Known affectionately as ‘Polly’s’.

Elsie March

September 3rd

On 3rd September 1292, King Edward I stayed in his royal castle at Burstwick for 2 days, on his way back from Scotland. At some point he visited Wyke, and asked for a survey as part of plans to create a new town.

On 3rd September 1812, Abel Scurr, captain of Hull whaler Comet, left port for a whaling trip in the southern ocean, in the seas off the Galapagos. He was caught up in the Peruvian revolution, detained for a year, and then died before the ship began whaling, returning to port on 3.12.1815.

On 3rd September 1917, former Reckitt’s employee and driver G. Gill died of wounds received on active service with 37thDivision Ammunition Column and is buried in Bailleul Cemetery, France.

On 3rd September 1976, about 100 prisoners in Hull Prison, Hedon Road, took over 3 of the 4 wings, after a prisoner was beaten up by prison officers, citing grievances about conditions. Held a rooftop protest which lasted 67 hours. Huge amounts of damage were done to the prison, which was closed for a year.

 

Prison

August20th

wm le grosOn 20th August 1179, William le Gros, Count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness, died aged 64 after 50 years as Count. As Earl of York, the most powerful man in the north of England during the Anarchy, a soldier, and founder of religious houses, including Meaux Abbey, and Newton Grange leper hospital.

On 20th August 1526, John Dove, a labourer from Burstwick, and William Bayne, a tallow chandler from Withernwick, separately arrived and claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt. On a busy day at the sanctuary, a 3rddebtor arrived from Wakefield.

On 20th August 1535, Richard Browne, vicar of North Cave, confessed to heresy by preaching Lutheranism; he was absolved, after suspension for 2 months.