October 6th

site of Haltemprice Priory

On 6th October 1515, the Sheriff of Hull, Mr Mattison and 200 citizens fought the monks of Haltemprice Priory and threatened to pull down the monastery, over a dispute concerning jurisdiction over Wolfreton and Willerby, and fresh water supplies. Peace was restored by the Mayor of Hull, George Mattison and the issue was eventually resolved in the Star Chamber. One of many incidents in Hull’s ‘water wars’. photo shows site of the monastery.

On 6th October 1613, an enquiry determined that a chantry dedicated to St Mary, and a chaplain to celebrate daily services there, had been paid for by 6 1/4 acres of land, 10 messuages and 3 tofts, given to the town of Hedon by John de Burton and Henry Maupas. Chantries were abolished by Edward VI, along with other signs of Catholicism.

On 6th October 1670, Ann Barone was fined in the Patrington manor court for not making bread according to the assize – i.e. not the regulation size, weight etc.

On 6th October 1748, Mary Jackson, tenant farmer of Everingham, lost 36 of her 45 cattle to rinderpest, the cattle plague then affecting much of the East Riding.

On 6th October 1850, Hedon solicitor James Iveson, died after a long career controlling the political life of Hedon, a Rotten Borough described as ‘Lawyer-ridden’. He was also Town clerk, Mayor, land agent, and steward on behalf of the Constables of the Holderness Seigniory. The Iveson dynasty was involved in land enclosures, surveying and other profitable work. James was renowned for rudeness. Part of an ultra conservative council which for years resisted public health improvements. Collector of architectural remains from demolished churches. Engaged for some 20 years of protracted negotiation with Trinity House over Spurn Point.  portrait in Hedon Town Hall

On 6th October 1890, Chas Collier, aged 17 years, former pupil of Hull Trinity House School, died of typhoid fever in the Barque Miltiades off the west coast of Africa.

James Iveson, Hedon Town Clerk

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