October 28th

 

 

charterhouse.JPGOn 28th October 1451, the Mayor and town of Hull and the Prior and Convent of the Charterhouse reached agreement on 8 areas of dispute between them, chiefly relating to ownership of land and streets between the town walls and the Charterhouse, including the Trippett and the northern part of Pole Street, the rent due for them, and garden fences of the Charterhouse encroaching on the public highway.

On 28th October 1510, William Sedyngton of Flambrough claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 28th October 1880, during a storm, the Saffron, Jabez, and Earl of Derby separately crashed into the piers at Withernsea and Hornsea, 2 at Withernsea and 1 at Hornsea; both piers were substantially damaged. The Hornsea pier had only opened 5 months before, and was completely demolished in 1897. The Withernsea pier had been open 2 years, and was to have several more ships crash into it before being demolished, apart from the 2 remaining towers.

On 28th October 1910, the Aldbrough Rocket Brigade rescued the crew of the trawler Castor of Grimsby, which ran aground on Aldbrough beach, whilst the Hornsea Lifeboat crew took an hour against high winds to row to the site. Later the Secretary of the Hornsea branch of the RNLI said that Hornsea did not have strong men like they had in Bridlington and it was the worst place on the coast to get a lifeboat.

October 22nd

On 22nd October 1517, John Cook, yeoman of Sewerby, claimed sanctuary after assaulting labourer Thomas Stowpes and fled to Flambrough church.  This was not a registered place of sanctuary, but was called ‘taking church’. At a Coroner’s inquest at Sewerby on 5.11.1517, the jurors reported that Cook assaulted Stowpes on 22 Oct, giving him a wound from which he died 3 days later.

On 22nd October 1611, Lady Margaret Clifford, daughter of the Earl of Cumberland and Thomas Wentworth, future baronet, were married at All Saints, Londesborough. The Earl’s finances were not healthy, due to a protracted legal dispute with Lady Anne Clifford over his inheritance, so the celebrations were low-key, with only 40 in attendance, and a simple dinner of pasties, mince pies and turkey, a speciality of the estate. The artist Augustine Harrison was present, so that the Earl could present his 2 daughters with identical portraits of himself. photo shows Londesbrough church

On 22nd October 1882, William Butler, 16, 4thhand, was lost overboard from Hull trawler Sportsman in the North Sea.

On 22nd October 1972, the new Queen Elizabeth Dock container terminal was opened.

 

Londesborough

 

October 20th

On 20th October 1536, Sir Robert Constable of Flamborough took command of Hull after a siege lasting 5 days, by the East Riding rebels of the Pilgrimage of Grace. The only condition the inhabitants made was that no-one would be forced to take the pilgrims’ oath.

On 20th October 1580, Rowlande Burton was called before the Hull mayor and aldermen to answer a charge of dealing in hops without paying a customs charge. They agreed that he would pay the charges due.

On 20th October 1586, Luke Fox (or Foxe) was born in Hull. He explored much of the Hudson Bay in search of the Northwest Passage. Later became a brother of Hull Trinity House and in 1635 published ‘North-west Fox, or Fox from the Northwest Passage’. Died approx 15.7.1635.

On 20th October 1749, a ’sudden and dreadful’ fire broke out at night when the Stamford Bridge Mills machinery overheated.

On 20th October 1890, Withernsea pier was damaged for a third time since its opening 12 years before, when an unmanned Grimsby fishing smack, the Genesta, smashed into it, and destroyed half of the remaining pier (see 19.10). Another boat, the Henry Parr, smashed into it in 1893, leaving only 50 feet, which remnant was removed in 1903 during work on the sea wall.

On 20th October 1958, the Malton to Driffield Railway closed to freight traffic, passenger traffic having ceased in 1950.

 

W'sea pier

September 23rd

On 23rd September 1066, Harold Hardraada, with his Norse troops, fresh from securing York, made his way to Stamford Bridge for a parley with locals about provisions. Instead, he met Harold Godwinson’s army, and he died at the Battle of Stamford Bridge, ‘the most important battle that has ever been fought in England’.

On 23rd September 1581, Hull alderman and merchant Peter Crewe was fined the sum of £1 in 3 instalments for using false weights in selling bales of flax to a merchant called Trewyt of Nottingham and others. (& see 30.9)

On 23rd September 1704, Henry Stork, seaman who served in a man-of-war in the Queen’s Fleet, was buried after 6 months of illness at home in Hutton, after being invalided out of the Navy, fighting in the War of the Spanish Succession, in Europe or in North America. We do not know what he suffered from.

On 23rd September 1779, John Paul Jones, American navy commander, fought the Battle of Flamborough Head: an American squadron attacked a large British merchant convoy and their 2 escort vessels, during the American War of Independence.

On 23rd September 1797, Hull Trinity House paid 18 shillings to Thomas Ward, mate of the Flora, and Thomas Porrell, a seaman, after their ship was captured by the French.

On 23rd September 1897, Frank Percy Bentley, a boy, summoned George Creaser of Nafferton for assault; Creaser pleaded guilty for hitting him ‘once or twice’ with a stick after finding his son and Bentley fighting. The Driffield magistrates also heard at least 6 cases of ‘drunk and disorderly’ behaviour, a case of non-payment of rates and poor rate, a dispute about rates of pay, a summons for allowing horses to stray, a case of begging, and one assault. All despatched before lunch.

stamford bridge3.JPG

September 9th

On 9th September 1513, Marmaduke Constable, of Flamborough was knighted for his role in the Battleof Flodden Field, and a letter of thanks from Henry VIII is displayed in Wassand Hall. Ralph Ellerker, senior of Risby and his son Ralph were also both knighted. This causes some confusion in the historical record, as there were 2 Sir Ralph Ellerkers alive at the same time.

On 9th September 1643, Rev James Sibree reported that on Sunday he had preached twice, visited the cemetery 3 times, and interred 43 bodies of his fellow citizens. During the cholera outbreak, many church services were held outdoors in the Market Place, by ministers of different denominations, and attended by more than 3,000 people. photo shows Cholera Memorial in Western Geneeral Cemetery.

On 9th September 1878, George Carr, aged 45 and Joseph Carr, aged 26, accidentally drowned in Hornsea.

On 9th September 1956, Captain Erik Ohsman, and Chief Steward V. Stenros, of SS Lona, were rescued by firemen when they were found unconscious after fire was discoveredon their Swedish ship, loaded with over 3k tons of pit props. Both recovered. The fire, which started in the engine room, spread to the cargo, and after several hours the ship had to be scuttled in the dock to prevent greater damage. She was raised on 11 October and repaired. Cholera memorial

September 2nd

On 2nd September 1643, the Royalists under the Earl of Newcastle began the second siege of Hull. The Governor, Lord Ferdinand Fairfax, sold silver to the value of £400 4s to Hull Trinity House, in order to pay his soldiers. Trinity House sold the silver the following year at a slight profit.

On 2nd September 1861, the lease on Fishwicks’ Mill, butt Lane, Beverley, had expired, and the mill was demolished. The Council tried to repossess the land, but local people considered it to be common land, and 25-30 rioters destroyed the house and burnt it to the ground.

On 2nd September 1871, William (Billy) Ringrose was born in Ganton, where he became a carpenter, but was coached by a cricket professional employed by the Legard family at the Hall, and became a renowned professional cricketer, playing for 57 games for Yorkshire.

On 2nd September 1922, Hull Kingston Rovers played its first game at its new ground, Craven Park, losing 3-0 to Wakefield. The new grounds also had 14 tennis courts, and meeting rooms. The official opening did not take place until November. This was the club’s 4thground, the first 2 being in West Hull.

On 2nd September 1950, MV Dundalk Bay arrived in Hull from Mombasa, bringing 1,014 people displaced by WW2. After processing, they were dispersed to various camps throughout the UK. Many Poles, Latvians, Lithuanians and others unable to return to their homes came to find work and settle in England; some emigrated again to Canada.

On 2nd September 1967, the Flamborough lifeboat Friendly Forester rescued 6 people cut off by the tide.

Old Craven Park EAW207783

August 25th

On 25th August 1929, 4 boys were on the dockside on a Sunday evening when fire broke out. They helped to save equipment and rescued a cat from one of the trawlers. The fire destroyed the recently refurbished No 2 Market, 100 offices, 105 railway wagons, and set alight 7 trawlers, 3 of which were totally burnt out. Damage was variously valued at £250,000 and £750,000. The cause was probably an electrical fault.

On 25th August 1940, 6 residents of Rustenburg Street, Hull, in their Anderson shelter, were the first fatalities due to Hull air raids. photo shows an Anderson shelter in construction.

On 25th August, 1956, A train of empty coaches hit the buffers at speed and went up onto the platform at Filey Holiday Camp Rail Station.  An enquiry found that the brakes were not properly coupled. Driver Goforth,  Fireman Bentley and Guard Wharam were slightly injured.

On 25th August 1972, the crew of the Flamborough lifeboat Friendly Forester rescued 2 people cut off by the tide at Flamborough.

 

Anderson shelter

August 14th

On 14th August 1715, John Burdas, bricklayer, aged 26, placed a “ffaine” (possibly a weather vane?) on top of the newly-repaired top of the steeple of St Patrick’s church. This required him to stand for some hours with one foot on the top stone and the other foot on the top of a ladder ‘to everyone’s wonder and admiration’.

On 14th August 1831,  William Stephenson of Beverley had his will registered at York Assizes, the main beneficiary being Dr Alexander Turnbull of Hull. The doctor sued witnesses to the will who alleged it had been improperly drawn up. He lost his case, and left Hull soon afterwards.

On 14th June 1934, coxswain George Leng of Flamborough lifeboat Forester rescued 4 men from the cliffs at Thornwick Bay; they were in danger of drowning and unable to climb higher, in great danger as the tide had not reached its height. He threw them a line and got them into the lifeboat.

On 14th August 1937, Hull Baseball Club won the National Baseball Assn Open Challenge Cup 5-1 against Romford Wasps. Baseball was played at Craven Park until the outbreak of WW2.

On 14th August 1943, a company of 200 ‘British Pioneers’ was drafted to Hull for work on the docks, due to an increase in the number of ships carrying cargoes of war materials.

 

Pat church

July 6th

On 6th July 1381, William Haldene of Beverley had his brains literally knocked out by John Erghom and others, with a pole-axe, 2 battle-axes, 6 swords, 2 forks and other weapons, before his body was thrown into the beck in Walker Lane.

On 6th July 1382, Sir Michael de la Pole leased to John de Hedersee and John of Dimlington land in Myton which included arable land, pasture and at least 30 acres of meadow, with houses, sheepfolds, 600 sheep and 160 lambs. Myton was clearly very rural then.

On 6th July 1537, the body of Sir Robert Constable of Flamborough was displayed on Beverley Gate, Hull, after he was hanged for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace, despite having been pardoned the previous year.

On 6th July 1538, Hull agreed to give a place in the Charterhouse to the wife of a blind man named Ralph, as his carer during his lifetime, taking up a place normally reserved for a man.

On 6th July 1642, Robert & Christopher Hildyard of Winestead, Francis Cobbe of Ottringham, and 300 other Holderness people met King Charles I at Keyingham and handed him a petition against Sir John Hotham’s actions in flooding farmland and taking livestock into Hull. The King was visiting The Providence, which had landed arms from Holland. The King sympathised, but said he could do nothing except raise troops, as he had no power to control Hotham.

On 6th July 1644, the Hull Committee of Sequestrations formally adjudged alderman James Watkinson a delinquent, 2 years after he left Hull to join the Royalist army, and they ordered that his post as alderman be filled by election.

On 6th July 1901, G.E. Conrad Naewiger complained in a letter to the Hull Daily Mail of the lack of steps to Aldbrough beach, a popular destination for works outings from Hull. photo shows Aldbrough cliff.

On 6th July 1910, Arthur Geoffrey Dickens was born in Hull. Professor of History at the University of Hull, he was elected Fellow of the British Academy. Considered the leading historian of the Reformation of his time. Awarded the Order of Merit by the German Government. (died 31.7.2001)

On 6th July 1921, Tilworth Grange was opened to ‘Female mental defectives’ (people with learning disabilities), the first provision in Hull for people who previously were sent to institutions in Bristol, Chesterfield and Ormskirk. Winestead Hall was bought in 1931 for men.

 

erosion aldboro.JPG

May 15th

FlambroughOn 15th May 1498, Robert Barker of Wistow, near Selby claimed sanctuary at Beverley’s  church of St John, for the murder of John Towree at Wistow on 9th May.

On 15th May 1591, priest Robert Thorpe, and Thomas Watkinson were executed at York – Thorpe being hanged, drawn and quartered for treason, and Watkinson hanged as a felon for harbouring priests. Both were arrested at Menthorpe on Palm Sunday, when neighbours saw palms being taken into Watkinson’s house, by the local magistrate John Gates.

On 15th May 1613, Lady Grissell Clifford, Countess of Cumberland, died, aged 54 at Londesborough. She appears to have been generous to the local poor, and almost the entire female populations of Londesborough and Shipton attended her funeral. Memorial in Londesbrough church.

On 15th May 1618, Phillip Constable of Wassand Hall was killed in a duel at White Cross, Leven, by Edmund (or Edward) Percy. Constable buried in Goxhill. Difficult to verify any details, except that Philip Constable died in 1618, and that duels were considered a foreign introduction at the time.

On 15th May 1896, a temporary dam created during building work for the Fish Dock extension, Hull, burst, and the sudden rush of water smashed and sank the fishing smack Young Greg.

On 15th May 1951, motor mechanic Edward Slaughter, of the Flambrough lifeboat crew, was awarded an RNLI bronze medal and Mrs Porter’s Award (given annually for the bravest deed of the year by a lifeboat man). A boy was badly injured falling 150 feet from the Flambrough cliffs, and E.S. swam to him, got him on to a stretcher and guided the stretcher to the cliff top.