September 22nd

On 22nd September 1690, Beverley Corporation gave permission to create a racecourse between the Newbald and Walkington roads. Horse racing had probably taken place on Westwood for 300 years, but this was the first time a course was formally laid out.

On 22nd September 1716, Leonard Chamberlain, draper, died at Hesslewood House, Hessle, and left property and estates in Sutton, Stoneferry, Selby, Dunswell and Hessle and his charitable bequests continue to this day. A Presbyterian, he supported those who had been discriminated against on religious grounds, gave money for educating the poor ‘of whatever persuasion or denomination soever’.  Commemorated in Chamberlain Road and Chamberlain Street, Sutton. photo shows one of the Sutton properties

On 22nd September 1761, to mark the coronation of King George III and Queen Charlotte, Col Duncombe’s Battalion of militia drilled in Beverley Market Place, and fired volleys, while the Corporation held a dinner for the officers, the bells rang, and in the evening there were illuminations.

On 22nd September 1778 was the official opening of The Dock, Hull. (It became known as Queen’s Dock after Victoria visited the city in 1854). The first ship in was the whaler Manchester, decorated all over with flags of the nations, followed by the Favourite, the largest ship in the port at 1,000 tons (burthen). 20,000 spectators were entertained by cannon fire and a musket salute from the garrison, and the great and the good were fed and sumptuously entertained.

On 22nd September 1856, Count de Werdinsky died in Hull aged 53, in abject poverty, after variously representing himself as a Polish count, inventor and doctor. He was a bankrupt, a fraudster, and had several counts of assault and indecent assault against women. His memorial is in the Western Cemetery

On 22nd September 1914, the crews of HMS Aboukir, Cressy and Hogue, 3 Navy cruisers, were sunk by a German u-boat, with the loss of 1,450 lives. This not only led to a public outcry, but also the need to provide for a large number of orphaned children. Some of the children were admitted by Hull’s Sailors’ Children’s Society and put up in its holiday home in Hornsea, as well as in the Newland Homes. By 1915, 108 children of seamen lost in action were admitted, from across the country.

leonard chamberlain sutton.JPG

 

 

September 17th

On 17th September 1523, Hull widow Dame Joan Thurscross in her will left £30 for new vestments for St Mary’s church, £35 to hire a priest for seven years to sing for her soul, the souls of her three husbands, of her parents, and of her son, £4 to the building works at the White Friars’, £20 for mending the causeway between Beverley and Anlaby, thirteen white gowns for thirteen poor women, and silver for Hull Charterhouse.

On 17th September 1584, Peter Copley, clothier, was stripped of his status as burgess of Hull and disenfranchised, as a penalty for dyeing the clothes of people from outside the town and bartering the goods of ‘strangers’ as though they were his own. As he was ill at the time, he was not informed of this until he recovered.

On 17th September 1679, Rev Thomas Sedgwick died, aged 58. Puritan theologian and Vicar of St Giles, Marfleet between 1639 and 1672, he is commemorated with a memorial in the church, for the unusual feat of surviving in his post through the Civil War and Reformation.  photos show memorial and translation

On 17th September 1864, 3 residents of Hessle Road, Hull aboard the Humber ferry were gored when a bull being carried across broke loose and ran amok.

September 13th

On 13th September 1420, Sir Gerard Usflete III and his wife Elizabeth, Duchess of Norfolk, had no surviving children. His will said that all his lands and tenements in Swanland and Ousefleet should be sold and the proceeds distributed to the poor. In return, the poor were to pray for his soul every year. He fought at Agincourt, was an associate of the De la Poles, and was Sheriff of Yorkshire. Buried at North Ferriby.

On 13th September 1512, Christopher Person, mercer of Routh, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley,  for debt.

 

Beverley Minster

September 1st

On 1st September 1505, John and Thomas Mudd of Tunstall claimed sanctuary in the church of St Cuthbert  for homicide, stating that on 1.8.1505, in self-defence, they had struck Henry Raw also of Tunstall on the head with a pikestaff, giving him a blow from which he died on 30.8.1505. On 2.9.1505 Oliver Mudd and John Mudd jnr (son of John) also sought sanctuary as accessories to the homicide, having been present when the first 2 struck Henry.

On 1st September 1512, Ralph Thorneton, a smith, of Rise, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 1st September 1784, Hull General Infirmary charity officially opened a hospital with 70 beds in Prospect Street, a site chosen for its fresh country air. The 3 physicians and 3 surgeons provided their services free. In its centenary year, Queen Victoria agreed to a change of name to Hull Royal Infirmary.

On 1st September 1800, John Batman lost his place at Hull Charterhouse  ‘on account of his immoral and disorderly conduct and of the great expences (sic) which the Town have sustained by the maintenance of his bastard children’.

 

Charterhouse 1780

August 22nd

On 22nd August, 1138, William le Gros, Earl of Albemarle and Lord of Holderness, was made Earl of York, in recognition of his prowess in the Battle of the Standard at Cowton Moor, Northallerton. The 4 standards of St John of Beverley, St Peter of York, St Cuthbert of Durham, and St Wilfred of Ripon, were used as a rallying point for the English against the Scots. The East Riding contingent included a Percy and a de Stuteville. (and see 20.8)

On 22nd August 1572, Thomas Percy, 7thEarl of Northumberland, was executed at York for treason, as leader of the Rising of the North. He was offered mercy if he renounced Catholicism, and refused.  Beatified by the Catholic church. (b 1528, probably in  Leconfield)

On 22nd August 1711, James Rand left £160 in his will for ‘the poor and needful of Preston’. Rands Estate in the village is named for him.

On 22nd August 1917, a bomb from a German Zeppelin destroyed the Primitive Methodist chapel, Baxtergate, Hedon.

On 22nd August 1918, Alfred Buchanan Cheetham of Bean Street, Hull, was killed when the SS Prunelle was torpedoed in the North Sea by a German U-boat. He took part in 3 Polar expeditions, and spent a total of 6 years in the Antarctic, with both Scott and Shackleton. Awarded the Silver Polar Medal clasp, he claimed to have crossed the Antarctic Circle 14 times. Cape Cheetham is named for him. (b 6.5.1867 Liverpool)

On 22nd August 1925, Robin Skelton died aged 72 in victoria, Canada. Poet, literary editor, professor and author of books on wicca. Born in Easington 12.10.1925

 

robin skelton

August 21st

On 21st August 1821, Zachariah Charles Pearson was born in Hull.  Ship’s captain, later ship owner.  Sheriff of Hull 1858, Mayor 1859 – 1862. In 1860, he gave 27 acres to the town for a public park, now Pearson Park. During the American Civil War, he sold arms and equipment to the Confederates, it is said to ensure a supply of cotton to the Hull cotton mills.   He lost several ships to action by the US Federal Navy and was made bankrupt in 1863. He resigned all public posts, and was disgraced, never regaining his former position. Died 29.10.1891

On 21st August 1833, the flying buttresses at the northeast of the tower of St Patrick’s church, Patrington, were blown down and damaged the roof during a violent storm.

On 21st August 2005, Hull businessman Graham Boanas waded across the Humber, from Brough to Whitton, one of the most dangerous waterways in the UK, to raise money for charity.  The only recorded instance of this feat.

graham boanas

July 24th

On 24th July 1614, Ralph Hansby founded almshouses for 3 poor persons at Bishop Burton.

On 24th July 1622, Lawrence Taylor, rector of Londesborough,  died intestate, and the York Consistory (Ecclesiastical) Court gave custody of his 6 children, and a 7thchild born in October, to his brother William, to be supported until age 21. No information on the fate of his widow.

On 24th July 1894, John William Russell was shot dead on Albert Dock, Hull, by Arthur Kendall. Russell was trying to defend Crossland from Kendall. Kendall was convicted at York Assizes, his sentence commuted to penal servitude.

On 24th July 1912, a heavy cloudburst over Westwood brought flooding to Beverley town centre. Water was a foot deep on Walkergate.

On 24th July 1942, bus inspector Ernest Goddard, aged 50, and 14 others, including 5 children, were killed in an air raid on Withernsea; as well as 2 bombs, in Queen Street and the bowling green, the German Dornier bomber had used small arms fire on local people.

On 24th July 2011, 5 thieves stole the 300kg statue from Nelson Street, Hull; called Voyage, the statue was created by Steinunn Thorarinsdottir, as a symbol of the relationship between Hull and Iceland.  A replacement statue was unveiled 11.5.2012.

iceland statue plinth.JPGphoto shows the empty plinth.

June 27th

On 27th June 1658, William Thorpe, clerk to the parish of Ellerker (which may have meant minister) was buried in Ellerker. In his will he gave 10s to be paid yearly for the relief of the poor ‘for ever’.

On 27th June 1908, Princes Avenue Wesleyan Sunday School held its Annual Treat at the Old Polo Ground,  Westbourne Avenue, Hull. Games were played before tea, with races and balloons after, and prizes given.

On 27th June 1927, Thomas Jacques Somerscales, RA, died aged 85 in Princes Avenue, Hull. A respected marine artist who began his professional career in Valparaiso, Chile, and later returned as an unknown to his native country, where his work can be seen in the Tate Gallery. (b Hull 29.10.1842)

On 27th June 2010, Barbara Buttrick was inducted into the Florida Boxing Hall of Fame, aged 80. Born in Cottingham in 1930, she began boxing in 1945, married her manager and moved to Florida in 1952. At 4’ 11”, she was known as the Mighty Atom.  She retired from boxing with a record of 30:1:1.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTvwtinq5qg thomas-somerscales-port-of-iquique-chile-1903-thomas-somerscales

June 19th

On 19th June 1256, the Meaux Abbey chronicler reported losing men and oxen at Orwithfleet, south of Patrington. A major flood of the Humber reached as far north as Cottingham, with many lives lost, livestock and fisheries devastated, and land washed into the river.

On 19th June 1607, Thomas Wincop, Master of Hull Charterhouse, bought, with Hull Mayor George Almond and other trustees, land in Haltemprice Wood abutting on the common fields of Willerby, to support the running costs; the Charterhouse already owned substantial property in and around Hull. photo shows Wincop’s memorial in Hull Minster.

On 19th June 1837, Hull Steam Packet Company launched the paddle steamer Victoria at Medley’s shipyard, Hull; she was considered state of the art. A boiler explosion in 1838 killed 5 crew; there was a second explosion the same year; she ran onto rocks in 1852 and was wrecked, with 8 people killed.

On the same day, Rev Joseph Coltman died in Beverley at the age of 60. He was known for his support of local charities, of the emancipation of Catholics, and of the abolition of slavery. Born in Hull, Coltman Street was named for him, as was Beverley’s Coltman Avenue. At 37 stone 8lbs, he was reputed to be the heaviest man in England, and his death may have been caused by his weight. He employed a manservant to turn him in bed, but he fell asleep and Coltman suffocated in his sleep.

On 19th June 1887, to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Jubilee, a state service was held in Holy Trinity church, Hull, the new Market Hall was opened, as was East Park, and there were festivities in all the city’s wards.

On 19th June 1920, Harry Wilkinson of  Lower Union Street, Hull, was seriously injured by 3 gunshots.  He was part of a mob of white people who attacked and damaged several boarding houses where black seamen lived. Tom Toby, a West African fireman, was charged with wounding, but no white people were arrested. Toby’s plea of self defence was accepted, and he was found not guilty. During the same rioting, Murrell Piggott, faced with a 200-strong crowd, had also fired, but his plea of self defence was not accepted, and he was sentenced to 9 months’ hard labour for unlawful wounding.

On 19th June 1940, the East Hull, docks, suburbs, and River Hull corridor experienced the first night-time raid of World War 2.

 

Thomas Whincopp memorial

June 16th

On 16th June 1487, John de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln, died aged 22 (or 25), in the Battle of Stoke (near Newark) fighting against Henry VII, attempting to place Lambert Simnel on the English throne.

On 16th June 1793, the 42nd Regiment of Highlanders in Hull and 200 soldiers were sent to service at Fish Street Congregational Chapel.

On 16th June 1872, Sarah Stickney Ellis died aged 73.  A Quaker turned Congregationalist, she was a prolific author, and advocate of women’s education. (Born 1799 at Ridgmont, Burstwick)

On 16th June 2012, Hull-born Joe Longthorne, a singer of Romani heritage, was awarded an MBE for services to charity. (b31.5.1955)

 

joe longthorne