December 17th

On 17th December 1216, William de Forz was given as a hostage with his mother Aveline to the new King Henry III when his father, William de Forz II, count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, supported the barons. Presumably this was to assure the king of his loyalty, as he had been a supporter of King John.

On 17th December 1965, North Sea Ferries began operating a ferry service from Hull to Rotterdam, for freight vehicles and private cars. MV Norwave’s maiden voyage saw a force 10 gale, which caused some trailers to break free of their shackles, but damage was minimal. The sister ship Norwind joined the service in March 1966.

Norwave

December 5th

On 5th December 1679, the Commissioner of Sewers ordered that the earth banks of the Julian and Derringham Springs be replaced with brick or stone, to keep Hull’s drinking water from contamination.

On 5th December 2013, high tides and storm surge breach Spurn Point, destroy much of the road, and drown about 30 sheep. Yorkshire Wildlife Trust have not repaired the temporary roadway, deciding to leave the Point to nature.

Spurn to river from sea.JPG

November 19th

On 19th November 1484, Thomas Squirry, husbandman of Leven, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for killing John Hewlyn.

On 19th November 1855, Henry Holmes and John Combes, crew members of the Spurn lifeboat, drowned in stormy weather attempting to rescue the schooner Zabina on the Binks, River Humber.

spurn boats.JPG

November 9th

On 9th November 1309, King Edward II visited his Royal park in Burstwick, his main residence in the north.  Piers Gaveston was Lord of Holderness.

On 9th November 1487, John de la Pole senior, Duke of Suffolk, was stripped of most of his property and estates as a result of his son’s rebellion (the Earl of Lincoln) in support of Lambert Simnel.

On 9th November 1488, John Fernell, yeoman, of Asselby, killed Thomas Rodley with a staff, and then made his way to Beverley, where on 17.11 he claimed the sanctuary of the church of St John, and admitted the homicide.

On 9th November 1906, Capt Stensen and 5 crew of a Norwegian schooner carrying timber stranded at Withernsea in a gale. There were no casualties.

On 9th November 1916, Private Herbert Neal, 24, former Reckitt’s employee in the lead mill was killed in action with the East Yorkshire Regiment and is buried in Bazentin-le-petit, Somme, France. 2 of his brothers also served in the war, and only 1 survived to return home to Church St, Hull.

On 9th November 1923, Sir Henry Wood, originator of the Proms, made his first appearance as conductor of the Hull Philharmonic Orchestra, originally for one concert only. He stayed for 15 years, travelling from London to work with amateur musicians for a considerably reduced fee. An earlier contact with Hull was 1906 when Ethel Leginska performed for him in London.

Sir Henry Wood

October 19th

On 19th October 1469, John Fisher was born in Beverley, the eldest son of Robert and Agnes Fisher. Chancellor of Cambridge University, Bishop of Rochester, and chaplain to royalty.  He was executed for treason 22.6.1535 on Tower Hill, for speaking out against Henry VIII’s divorce, and refusing to acknowledge the heirs of Henry and Ann Boleyn as legitimate successors to the throne. A Catholic martyr, he was canonized as St John Fisher.

On 19th October 1781, Rev George Lambert reported in his diary on a very high tide which inundated many houses in Hull.

On 19th October 1826, a Huggate parish jury of 12 men, 2 affearers (assessors of fines) and the pinder, set penalties for anyone allowing cattle into public lanes at night at 2s6d per head, for the first offence, and 5s per head for every offence afterwards; for allowing pigs in the streets without a ring between May Day and Michaelmas 3d per head; for allowing geese in the streets between Old Mayday and Old Lammas, 1s; for allowing anyone to stay who does not have a certificate allowing them to settle, £1 19s 11d.

On 19th October 1890, John Connell, boatman, of Waxholme, in the Coastguard Service, took part in the rescue of crew from the Grimsby vessel Genesta when it ran aground. All were rescued, except the captain, who died of exposure. Connell went on to the vessel as it was breaking up to rescue a man too weak to help himself. Connell was awarded the Humane Society Silver Medal. The unmanned vessel broke free the following day and travelled to Withernsea.

On 19th October 1964, rail passengers took their last trips on the Hull to Withernsea and Hull to Hornsea rail lines, which closed as a result of the Beeching Report. Goods services to Withernsea continued to 30.4.1965, to Hedon 3.5.1965, and to Marfleet to 1972. photo shows part of Hornsea Rail Trail today.

Hornsea Rail Trail

 

October 11th

ON 11th October 1536, Marmaduke Thomson, vicar of Preston, rang the church bell and called parishioners to meet at Nuthill, where he swore in local men to join the Pilgrimage of Grace. Around 300 Holderness men left to assemble at Sutton Ings. (& see 10.10)

On 11th October 1643, 1500 Parliamentary troops left the besieged town of Hull and after 2 attempts and many hours’ fighting, drove the Royalists out of all their positions around the town.

On 11th October 1782, Rev George Lambert described Hull Fair as ‘A season for the amusement of children and the gratification of gluttony’.

On 11th October 1929, Mrs Edith Robson officially opened Hedon Road Maternity Hospital, the successor to the free maternity home for poor mothers, which she gave as a gift, fully equipped, to Hull Corporation in 1915.

 

fair 07

September 24th

On 24th September 1298, an inquisition was held by the Court of Chancery into Sir Osbert de Spaldington’s goods and lands, which were taken by the king. As recently as 1296, Edward had made him Governor of Berwick, when he received Robert the Bruce and imprisoned Sir William Douglas. It is not known what the allegations against him were, and he recovered most of his land by 1300, after living on the generosity of others in the meantime.

On 24th September 1401, Pope Boniface IX declared John of Bridlington a saint. John was born in Thwing, had been the Prior of Bridlington and died of the plague in 1379, aged 59. 15 miracles are recorded during his life, and 12 after his death, including saving the lives of 5 Hartlepool fishermen caught in a storm. photo shows Brid Priory church

On 24th September 1678, the wife of Thomas Richardson of Wyton died and was buried in the Quaker cemetery in Sutton.

On 24th September 1779, Lord Rockingham, High Steward of Hull, chaired a public meeting in Hull Town Hall at which it was decided that 20 18-lb guns and military equipment due to be sent to Woolwich should be used instead to defend Hull from the threat of American attack. A few days later, the threat reduced when the Americans sailed for Holland.

On 24th September 1830, Hull gunsmith Thomas Rosindale was convicted of vagrancy, having been found in the kitchen of the dwelling house of Charles Frost of Albion St. He was sent to Sculcoates House of Correction for 1 month’s hard labour.

On 24th September 1832, Mr J. Dunn caught a 17lb trout near Driffield.

 

Brid Priory church

August 21st

On 21st August 1821, Zachariah Charles Pearson was born in Hull.  Ship’s captain, later ship owner.  Sheriff of Hull 1858, Mayor 1859 – 1862. In 1860, he gave 27 acres to the town for a public park, now Pearson Park. During the American Civil War, he sold arms and equipment to the Confederates, it is said to ensure a supply of cotton to the Hull cotton mills.   He lost several ships to action by the US Federal Navy and was made bankrupt in 1863. He resigned all public posts, and was disgraced, never regaining his former position. Died 29.10.1891

On 21st August 1833, the flying buttresses at the northeast of the tower of St Patrick’s church, Patrington, were blown down and damaged the roof during a violent storm.

On 21st August 2005, Hull businessman Graham Boanas waded across the Humber, from Brough to Whitton, one of the most dangerous waterways in the UK, to raise money for charity.  The only recorded instance of this feat.

graham boanas

August 6th

On 6th August 1778, the question of who owned Spurn Point was resolved in favour of the William Constable of Burton Constable; the legal dispute began in 1609.

On 6th August 1785, John Beck of Lelley was hanged at York Castle for setting fire to a house and corn mill belonging to William Jackson of Danthorpe, with Robert Crosby and John Edwards, also of Lelley; Edwards and Crosby escaped.

On 6th August 1859, John Riley, 36, of Hull, was hanged at York Castle for the murder of his wife, Alice.

On 6th August 1888, former Trinity House School pupil George Smith, age 15, drowned after a collision between the Barque Cambrian and a French Barque during a great storm in Valparaiso harbour.

On the same day, a Bank Holiday Monday, a popular trip out from Hull Corporation Pier was to Paull by boat to watch the Army’s Submarine Miners in training and holding boat races and athletic competitions. Several boats left the Pier during the day.

York Castle

 

August 4th

On 4th August 1511, John Hessey, husbandman of Belby, nr Howden, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of William Smyth of Didyngham (anyone know where this is?)

On 4th August 1652, Keyingham manor court fined 18 villagers for allowing their geese and pigs into the fields outside the stipulated times.

On 4th August 1795, Hull residents rioted against inflationary food prices and shortages. Much corn was being taken by the army, (Napoleonic Wars) in a year of poor weather. A few windows broken.

On 4th August 1834, John Venn, was born in Drypool, son of the vicar. Left Hull at age 8. Fellow of the Royal Society, famous mathematician, who introduced the Venn diagram. Commemorated in Hull University by the Venn Building. (d 4.4.1923) and by Drypool Bridge.

On 4th August 1851, G. Hought of Hutton Cranswick was killed by lightning, as he sheltered under a tree during a thunderstorm. He left a wife and 2 children.

On 4th August 1884, all 11 Walgate brothers of Aldbrough formed one cricket team in a match held at Rise Hall; the Walgates won the match by 3 wickets.

On 4th August 1969, HM Queen Elizabeth opened Queen Elizabeth Dock, the last major dock to be opened in Hull, accompanied by HRH Duke of Edinburgh and Princess Anne.

 

Drypool Bridge