August 3rd

On 3rd August 1349, John de Preston was elected Prior of North Ferriby on the death of John de Beverley, himself elected Prior just 10 days earlier on 24thJuly, when he succeeded the previous Prior Walter de Hessell on his death. This outbreak of the Black Death killed 35 out of 95 parish priests in East Yorkshire, and presumably a similar proportion of the general population.

On 3rd August 1523, Thomas Senexer, yeoman, of Holme on Spalding Moor, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt. photo shows the Frith Stool (sanctuary chair)

On 3rd August 1732, Robert Cook was killed when he fell from a wagon at one of the chalk pits in Hutton.

On 3rd August 1798, Press Gang seamen John Sykes and John Burnock or Burnick were killed when attempting to press the crew of the returning whaler Blenheim (& see 2.8). The fight was watched by crowds on the dockside. Capt Mitchinson was charged with murder (& see 31.3) The navy men were buried in Drypool Cemetery.

On 3rd August 1878, for 1d working people could attend a lecture on ‘The Yorkshire Wolds in Prehistory’ as part of Hull Literary and Philosophical Society’s new series of lectures to the working classes in the Exchange Building, aimed at keeping working people occupied during the new Saturday half holiday.

On 3rd August 1942, Mrs Frances Snowden, Lieut Stanley Lawrence and Charles Cross were killed when 4 bombs were dropped on Flemingate, Beverley, damaging Hodgson’s Tannery and destroying a house, a medical centre and a warden’s post. 15 people were injured, some of them machine-gunned by the German bomber.

minster - frith stool.JPG

July 29th

On 29th July 1527, John Flower, labourer of Burstwick, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the death of Roland Stephenson.

On 29th July 1678, Andrew Marvell, MP for Hull, had what turned out to be his last meeting with Hull Corporation. He returned to London shortly after, and died suddenly, aged 58, on 16thAugust, some supposed of poison.

On 29th July 1828, Hull banker Joseph Robinson Pease visited his land in Winestead to discover ‘hundreds of acres nearly a foot under water’ in the wettest July on record, a disaster for crops of hay, corn and potatoes. He said most local landowners had reduced rents, farmers ‘having literally nothing to pay with’.

 

Andrew Marvell

July 27th

On 27th July 1643, Hull widow Ann Stevenson, whose husband died at Beverley in Parliament’s service as a cannoneer, petitioned the town of Hull to pay her the 35 shillings wages due to him; the committee agreed, in view of her poverty, to let her have 20s.

On 27th July 1782, Rev George Lambert of Fish Street, Hull reported in his diary on a violent thunderstorm in the evening, and lightning killed a cow very near their house, and scorched the hedges.

On 27th July 1796, jockey George Heron was thrown by his horse at Hull racecourse, Newington, and killed.

On 27th July 1855, James McLoughlin, aged 13, asked Hull Magistrates Court for the protection of the court on account of his mother having beaten him severely with a stick and a fire poker because he would not go out stealing for her.

On 27th July 1996, HMS Rose visited Hull’s Albert Dock; this was an exact replica of a frigate built in Hull by the Blaydes yard in 1757 and sunk in Savannah, Georgia in 1779. The only difference from the original ship was that the sails were made from recycled plastic bottles.

HMS Rose replica

July 24th

On 24th July 1614, Ralph Hansby founded almshouses for 3 poor persons at Bishop Burton.

On 24th July 1622, Lawrence Taylor, rector of Londesborough,  died intestate, and the York Consistory (Ecclesiastical) Court gave custody of his 6 children, and a 7thchild born in October, to his brother William, to be supported until age 21. No information on the fate of his widow.

On 24th July 1894, John William Russell was shot dead on Albert Dock, Hull, by Arthur Kendall. Russell was trying to defend Crossland from Kendall. Kendall was convicted at York Assizes, his sentence commuted to penal servitude.

On 24th July 1912, a heavy cloudburst over Westwood brought flooding to Beverley town centre. Water was a foot deep on Walkergate.

On 24th July 1942, bus inspector Ernest Goddard, aged 50, and 14 others, including 5 children, were killed in an air raid on Withernsea; as well as 2 bombs, in Queen Street and the bowling green, the German Dornier bomber had used small arms fire on local people.

On 24th July 2011, 5 thieves stole the 300kg statue from Nelson Street, Hull; called Voyage, the statue was created by Steinunn Thorarinsdottir, as a symbol of the relationship between Hull and Iceland.  A replacement statue was unveiled 11.5.2012.

iceland statue plinth.JPGphoto shows the empty plinth.

July 12th

On 12th July 1537, Robert Aske of Aughton was hanged in chains outside Cliffords Tower, York, after being convicted of treason in Westminster, as the leader of the Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 12th July 1641, Sir Thomas Glemham resigned his post as Governor of Hull, having only been appointed the previous year.

On 12th July 1714, Elizabeth Hodgson, a single woman of Hedon, was sentenced at Hedon Quarter Sessions to be stripped to the waist and whipped with birch or willows from the Town Hall to Harrison Lane and from there to the jail and to remain in jail at hard labour until ‘sufficient security’ was found for her good behaviour. Her crime was to give birth to her 4thillegitimate child. There is no record of any punishment for the father. An Act of 1792 forbade whipping females for any reason whatsoever.

On 12th July 1826, (in one of the driest summers on record) Hessle banker Joseph Robinson Pease recorded in his diary there was no grass for the cattle, who had to be given linseed cake. Ponds and water tanks dry.  Around this time, too, the pond at Fridaythorpe dried up, and villagers went on a Sunday to nearby Fimber to take water from one of their 2 ponds, resulting in a pitched battle, referred to as ‘the Second Battle of Waterloo’. photo shows the remaining village pond at Fimber.

fimber pond.JPG

July 5th

On 5th July 1532, Henry VIII’s charter was read out in Hull Market Place, and prohibited anyone but Hull burgesses from conducting business in the port; the corporation paid £31 19s4d to obtain the charter, part of which was paid in the form of a sturgeon for Thomas Cromwell.

On 5th July 1657, a major fire in Hedon starting at 1 a.m. resulted in the loss of 42 houses, and others damaged. In August, the Mayor petitioned Parliament for permission to hold a collection to raise money; £4,000 was raised.

On 5th July 1776, John Wesley paid a visit to Howden and preached to a large congregation during a thunderstorm near Station Road, Howden. Wesley’s picture below

On 5th July 1811, Bridlington Collector of Customs Benjamin Milne discovered a tidal spring near the quay, now commemorated by a stone inscription.

On 5th July 1899, Hull Alderman Larard took the controls of the city’s first municipal electric tram (Siemens Bros & Co provided the electrical equipment). A spectator hoping for a good view, climbed on the roof of the public lavatories and fell through.

On 5th July 1930, the annual King’s Cup Air Race took place on this date, and planes had to follow a route of around 800 miles. Hull Aerodrome was a main control station on the route. Tickets were sold for 1s and 2s6d. The winner was Miss Winifred Brown in an Avro Avian III. (N.B. Hull Aerodrome is actually in Preston South.)

 

john wesley

July 2nd

On 2nd July 1642, the Royalist ship Providence, commissioned by Queen Henrietta Maria, evaded Parliamentary ships by entering Keyingham Creek, which was too narrow for the larger ships, and landed a consignment of arms from Holland for the Royalist army. With help from local people, they unloaded ammunition which was taken to the king at York.

On the same day, the Royalist army secured Hull Bridge, Tickton, on the Beverley side, to prevent attacks from Hull and stop provisions reaching Hull, and evicted constable William Cuthbert and his family at midnight.

On 2nd July 1644, Sir Thomas Metham of Metham near Howden,  died at the Battle of Marston Moor fighting on the Royalist side, captain of the Yorkshire gentlemen volunteers.

On 2nd July 1830, Hull whaler Progress was wrecked in a storm when iced in near the Davis Strait; 19 whalers were wrecked or lost that season, 4 of them from Hull.

On 2nd July 1837, Hull whaler Swan was sighted off Spurn Point as a memorial service was being held in Hull for the crew. They had been away for over a year and had been trapped in ice. 25 of the 48 crew had died.

On 2nd July 1954, Harold Macmillan, Minister of Housing and Local Government, approved the amended Hull Development Plan, regenerating the city after the bomb damage of the war. Hull Georgian Society lamented the loss of buildings such as many on High Street, the whole of Nile Street and houses in Lowgate. Not all of the proposals came about – there was to have been a ‘town park’ open area from Holy Trinity to Princes Dock.

 

June 26th

On 26th June 1793, Captain William Hammond died aged 65 in Kirk Ella. Hull sea captain, shipowner and merchant, supporter of abolition, Chairman of Hull Dock Company, Warden of Trinity House, and diplomat. (He and David Hartley MP met Benjamin Franklin and John Adams in Paris on a possible spying mission) Buried in Welton. (b 1727 York). Photo shows a door in the Maritime Museum, former Dock Offices.

On 26th June 1854, at an event to celebrate the opening of the Hull-Withernsea railway line, 500 guests travelled from Hull on the first ever train (which was 20 minutes late, due to late arrival of guests) and part of the lunch marquee collapsed; there were no injuries. Joseph Robinson Pease in his diary recorded heavy showers and high winds threatened to tear the marquee to pieces, but that it subsided and all passed off well.

On 26th June 1920, the National Federation of Women Workers called its Hull laundry worker members out on strike, as they were paid less than in other towns. Hull Trades Council supported the strike and organised a parade on 17 July. Strike breakers were reported being smuggled in to work in laundry baskets.

Hull Dock Co

June 9th

On 9th June 1786, a servant of Rev George Lambert of Hull gave notice that she was leaving after living with the family for 15 years, to live with a sailor who had recently sold his wife to another man. Most people considered this equivalent to divorce, although it had no status in law.

On 9th June 1888, a water spout in Langtoft sucked up mud and stones, and removed the soil from gardens, leaving bare chalk, as it moved across the local valleys. When it was halted by a steep hill, it deposited debris to the depth of 7 feet.

On 9th June 1965, Leslie Anthony Wegg was born in Hedon Road Maternity Hospital, Hull, with a full caul. A fisherman’s son, it was kept as a precious possession, despite a £100 offer to buy it. (from Eric Gill’s book “Superstitions’)

 

June 6th

On 6th June 1597, Robert Hewitt and his 6 musicians played for the first time at Londesborough House for Sir Francis and Lady Grissell Clifford, and regularly performed there for a number of years. They played shawms (like an oboe), curtals (like a bassoon), sackbuts (an early trombone) and the virginal (an early spinet). At different times, pipers, harpers, drama companies and a jester were hired.

On 6th June 1651, George Fox, Quaker preacher, proclaimed his Quaker beliefs in reply to the sermon at Beverley Minster; the next day he went another church 2 miles away, then to Cranswick, staying with John Hotham (grandson of the late governor of Hull).

On 6th June 1757, the vicar of Hutton Cranswick recorded a fall of snow.

On 6th June 1812, Hull Botanic Gardens were opened; the Band of the Royal Denby Militia played at the opening ceremony (they were based at the fort, as the Napoleonic Wars were still in progress).

On 6th June 1915, Hull residents sheltered under stairs and tables when they received an hour’s warning of the first Zeppelin attack on Hull. There were 11 deaths. Hewetson’s saw mill was destroyed. (other sources says 26 dead, 60 injured)

 

George Fox