November 23rd

On 23rd November 1599, the Council in the North made an order that John Gregory should serve as Hull Sheriff, although he had held the office 32 years before in 1567, and had asked to be released. He appears to have been successful in spite of the order.

On 23rd November 1796, John Taylor jnr, member of the Hull Troop of Gentlemen and Yeomanry Cavalry, was unanimously expelled and voted to Coventry for improper conduct. The record does not state what he did. photo shows cavalry of the time.

On 23rd November 1863, at the Howden Martinmas hiring fair, 700 men and 800 women attended, the largest number of any ER town; fairs were also held in Beverley, Bridlington, Driffield, Hedon, Patrington, where farmers and people seeking employment gathered. The church was concerned about the moral issues involved when single women had to parade themselves in public. Traditionally, farmworkers had a week’s holiday, annual wages paid, and there were pleasure fairs.

cavalry1796

October 24th

Beverley Minster

 

On 24th October 1530, at a Coroner’s inquest in Hutton Cranswick over the body of William Aunderson, the jurors reported that John Adayll, a labourer from Driffield, had on 23.10.1530 around 4p.m. assaulted him, with precogitated malice, with an iron fork, killing him instantly. Adayll immediately fled, with the townspeople of Hutton Cranswick pursuing him from town to town, but he escaped to ‘the privilege of Beverley’. Adayll does not appear in the sanctuary register for Beverley, though.

On 24th October 1850, John Branton, lifeboatman, drowned when the lifeboat overturned during the rescue of the brig Cumberland in the Humber near Kilnsea; John Welburn, the mate, was injured and died in 1852 from his injuries. The 9 members of the brig’s crew were rescued. An appeal raised £37 11s 6d for Branton’s widow and 6 children, and the RNLI added £5.

October 20th

On 20th October 1536, Sir Robert Constable of Flamborough took command of Hull after a siege lasting 5 days, by the East Riding rebels of the Pilgrimage of Grace. The only condition the inhabitants made was that no-one would be forced to take the pilgrims’ oath.

On 20th October 1580, Rowlande Burton was called before the Hull mayor and aldermen to answer a charge of dealing in hops without paying a customs charge. They agreed that he would pay the charges due.

On 20th October 1586, Luke Fox (or Foxe) was born in Hull. He explored much of the Hudson Bay in search of the Northwest Passage. Later became a brother of Hull Trinity House and in 1635 published ‘North-west Fox, or Fox from the Northwest Passage’. Died approx 15.7.1635.

On 20th October 1749, a ’sudden and dreadful’ fire broke out at night when the Stamford Bridge Mills machinery overheated.

On 20th October 1890, Withernsea pier was damaged for a third time since its opening 12 years before, when an unmanned Grimsby fishing smack, the Genesta, smashed into it, and destroyed half of the remaining pier (see 19.10). Another boat, the Henry Parr, smashed into it in 1893, leaving only 50 feet, which remnant was removed in 1903 during work on the sea wall.

On 20th October 1958, the Malton to Driffield Railway closed to freight traffic, passenger traffic having ceased in 1950.

 

W'sea pier

September 25th

On 25th September 1781, the Church authorities had Auburn Chapel taken down before it joined the rest of the village at the bottom of the cliff.

On 25th September 1882, Alfred Deakin, 11 and Frederick Gillett, 12, died as a result of an accident at a fireworks display in Hull Botanice Gardens. Several others were injured, 3 of them seriously. The inquest gave a finding of accidental death.

On 25th September 1917, Army gunners at Paull Point Battery prevented a Zeppelin attack on Hull, holding the craft in their searchlight until it was chased off by a fighter plane. The Battery was to the right of the houses on the photo – now known as Fort Paull.

On 25th September 1991, Officer cadet Kate Saunders, 22, became the first woman to eject from an aircraft when a bird strike caused her RAF Harrier to crash; she suffered a broken leg, broken pelvis, crushed vertebrae and 20% burns. The pilot, Sqn Ldr Ashley Stevenson, pulled her from the burning wreckage, and was awarded the Queens Commendation for Brave Conduct.

Paull

September 24th

On 24th September 1298, an inquisition was held by the Court of Chancery into Sir Osbert de Spaldington’s goods and lands, which were taken by the king. As recently as 1296, Edward had made him Governor of Berwick, when he received Robert the Bruce and imprisoned Sir William Douglas. It is not known what the allegations against him were, and he recovered most of his land by 1300, after living on the generosity of others in the meantime.

On 24th September 1401, Pope Boniface IX declared John of Bridlington a saint. John was born in Thwing, had been the Prior of Bridlington and died of the plague in 1379, aged 59. 15 miracles are recorded during his life, and 12 after his death, including saving the lives of 5 Hartlepool fishermen caught in a storm. photo shows Brid Priory church

On 24th September 1678, the wife of Thomas Richardson of Wyton died and was buried in the Quaker cemetery in Sutton.

On 24th September 1779, Lord Rockingham, High Steward of Hull, chaired a public meeting in Hull Town Hall at which it was decided that 20 18-lb guns and military equipment due to be sent to Woolwich should be used instead to defend Hull from the threat of American attack. A few days later, the threat reduced when the Americans sailed for Holland.

On 24th September 1830, Hull gunsmith Thomas Rosindale was convicted of vagrancy, having been found in the kitchen of the dwelling house of Charles Frost of Albion St. He was sent to Sculcoates House of Correction for 1 month’s hard labour.

On 24th September 1832, Mr J. Dunn caught a 17lb trout near Driffield.

 

Brid Priory church

September 23rd

On 23rd September 1066, Harold Hardraada, with his Norse troops, fresh from securing York, made his way to Stamford Bridge for a parley with locals about provisions. Instead, he met Harold Godwinson’s army, and he died at the Battle of Stamford Bridge, ‘the most important battle that has ever been fought in England’.

On 23rd September 1581, Hull alderman and merchant Peter Crewe was fined the sum of £1 in 3 instalments for using false weights in selling bales of flax to a merchant called Trewyt of Nottingham and others. (& see 30.9)

On 23rd September 1704, Henry Stork, seaman who served in a man-of-war in the Queen’s Fleet, was buried after 6 months of illness at home in Hutton, after being invalided out of the Navy, fighting in the War of the Spanish Succession, in Europe or in North America. We do not know what he suffered from.

On 23rd September 1779, John Paul Jones, American navy commander, fought the Battle of Flamborough Head: an American squadron attacked a large British merchant convoy and their 2 escort vessels, during the American War of Independence.

On 23rd September 1797, Hull Trinity House paid 18 shillings to Thomas Ward, mate of the Flora, and Thomas Porrell, a seaman, after their ship was captured by the French.

On 23rd September 1897, Frank Percy Bentley, a boy, summoned George Creaser of Nafferton for assault; Creaser pleaded guilty for hitting him ‘once or twice’ with a stick after finding his son and Bentley fighting. The Driffield magistrates also heard at least 6 cases of ‘drunk and disorderly’ behaviour, a case of non-payment of rates and poor rate, a dispute about rates of pay, a summons for allowing horses to stray, a case of begging, and one assault. All despatched before lunch.

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September 20th

On 20th September 1188, St John’s church at Beverley and most of the town were damaged by fire. St John’s remains were not found until 1197.

On 20th September 1535, John Colynson and Thomas Savage, yeomen of Holme on Spalding Moor were declared outlaws after spending more than a year in sanctuary in Ripon. They sought sanctuary in 1534, confessing to stealing a horse. Savage confessed to the murder of Amery Burdett, but Colynson did not confess, though a coroner’s jury found them both responsible, and indicted others as accessories.

On 20th September 1769, Felice de Giardini, famous violinist, played at the start of a 3-day festival to celebrate the installation of the new organ at Beverley Minster, the first festival of its type in the north of England. New music by Handel was performed, including the recently completed Messiah; tickets were 2s6d and 5s.

On 20th September 1779, Mr Foster, Bridlington quay master, reported that John Paul Jones’ American squadron of ships had attacked a large fleet of colliers and ran them into the harbour.

On 20th September 1813, Thomas Nutbrown was born in Eastrington.  Probably the same person who, aged 14 in 1828, applied to the Howden poor relief officers for some new clothes, and was granted a second hand coat. He died aged 72 in Leeds Township, Quebec, Canada, on 25 Sept 1885.

On 20th September 1883, Rev Edward Cragg Haynes died aged 62 in Swinefleet, after serving there for 32 years. Born in Barbados, classed as ’free coloured’, had links to the Clapham Sect. Set up a Grammar School in Swinefleet attended among others by Joseph Rank. (christened 3.6.1821)

On 20th September 1902, Stevie Smith was born Florence Margaret Smith in Hull. Poet and novelist, most famous for ‘Not waving but drowning’. D 7.3.1971 see photo

On 20th September 1903, Annie Marshall, 16, domestic servant, from Lissett, was raped, shot twice, suffocated with grass and thrown in the river at Scampston by Charles William Ashton, 19, of Cottingham, farmhand.  Ashton knew her well. He was found guilty of murder and hanged at Hull Prison on 11thDecember the same year.

On 20th September 1954, the Selby to Driffield rail line was closed for regular passenger traffic, a service of one regular non stop train each way plus occasional summer excursions ran until June 1965. The line was abandoned after the last freight train ran later that year.

On 20th September 1955, Robert Greenwood Tarran, of the Wolds, Beverley High Road, Hull, died aged 63. Civil engineering contractor, and founder of Tarran Industries Ltd, former Sheriff of Hull, and chief Air Raid Warden during WW2. He moved the Wilberforce monument, at his own expense, and was responsible for building 20,000 prefabs after the war. He was also suspected of complicity in profiting from deals over council land in Endike Lane, in a law case during which his colleague Digby Willoughby committed suicide.

StevieSmith