September 19th

On 19th September 1069, Northumbrians (incl Morcar and Edwin) with help of Danes besieged York and took Sir Wm Mallet hostage; in retaliation, William razed York to the ground and began the Harrying of the North. In effect, this was ethnic cleansing; some villages in the East Riding were still worth a fraction of their value 20 years later, or simply described as ‘waste’.

On 19th September 1532, William Orrell, a gentleman from Hull, was recorded as having been in the sanctuary of Westminster Abbey for about a year.  He had confessed to murdering Hull merchant John Lownde and was involved in complex legal questions as to whether he was an outlaw or not. He lobbied the King for restoration of his properties and positions, and by the 1540s was described as a gentleman of the King’s household.

On 19th September 1576, orders were given by Mayor and aldermen in York that the  house and shop of Gregory Burgess, physician & apothecary, should be shut up, probably because he had moved to Hull the previous year to treat people suffering from plague; and that he should be banned from entering York until further orders.

On 19th September 1674, bricklayer/builder William Catlyn, was elected Sheriff of Hull, but petitioned the town, pleading that his work took him to Lincolnshire, and he was unable to carry out the post. His petition seems to have succeeded, but he eventually became sheriff in 1683. Catlyn was responsible for building Wilberforce House, Crowle House, the Charterhouse and Master’s House (1628-1709). Brother of John Catlyn, Master of Hull Grammar School. photo shows Crowle House

On 19th September 1935, Herbert Morrison MP, and later High Steward of Hull, officially opened Queens Gardens, formed after the Queen’s Dock was closed in 1930. On the same day, the Wilberforce Monument, which had been moved from Monument Bridge, was rededicated by Wilberforce’s great granddaughter, Mrs Arnold Reckitt (nee Ann Barbara Wilberforce). Another relative of Morrison’s, Lord Peter Mandelson, later became High Steward of Hull.Crowle House

September 15th

On 15th September 1415, Henry V issued a General Pardon to the Mayor and town of Hull.  It is not clear for what they were being pardoned, though it may have been a general relaxation of taxes in gratitude for providing soldiers – or ships – after his success at Agincourt.

On 15th September 1561, William Calverde rented from Hull Corporation land called Hurne Close in Myton, with the right to pasture 20 sheep in the Common Carr of Myton.

On 15th September 1636, Hull Corporation was warned to prevent seamen arriving from ports infected with plague from coming ashore. Hull was in the midst of a serious 3-year outbreak which began in 1635.

On 15th September 1636, James II turned out of office 11 of the 13 elected Hull aldermen, the Mayor, High Steward, Recorder and Town Clerk, and replaced them with his own choice. This put Marmaduke Lord Langdale, in the powerful position of Governor of the garrison and Recorder, backed by 1199 soldiers, billeted on the residents. In December that year, Langdale was himself ejected.

Marmaduke_Langdale2

On 15th September 1864, Crown Prince Umberto of Italy stayed overnight at the Beverley Arms, after attending the St Leger at Doncaster, and left to visit James Hall’s stud at Scorborough.

On 15th September 1948, Mr J.H. Wilson, 33, labourer-driver, employed by East Riding  Agricultural Committee, was badly injured when he drove a lorry across a temporary rail crossing at Garton on the Wolds. The lorry was wrecked by a train, killing 3 Polish and Hungarian workers, and injuring another 4. The workers were people displaced by WW2, who were travelling to a Garton farm to help with the harvest. An enquiry recommended steps to improve the crossing.

August 31st

On 31st August 1292, King Edward I stayed at Kilham, on his return from Scotland, where he judged on the claims of Robert the Bruce and John Balliol for the crown, he also made several other stops in East Yorkshire.

On 31st August 1516,  Robert Chorkyls, husbandman, of Wyton, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of John Rotheram.

On 31st August 1579, Howden records state that 158 people died in the previous 5 months, at least 110 above the average, due to plague. The city of York forbade anyone from Howden or Snaith from entering the city.

On 31st August 1941, Minnie Leveson, nurse, aged 20, was killed by an air-raid on her home in Willerby; she is buried in De la Pole Hospital cemetery.

On 31st August 1943, 15 Wellington bombers took off from RAF Leconfield and 2 of them collided over Goole, killing both crews and 2 residents of North Street.

On 31st August 1946, Hull Lord Mayor Herbert Harrison officially opened Hull City AFC’s new stadium, Boothferry Park. The crowd of 25,586 were entertained by the band of the 2ndBattalion East Yorkshire Regiment. The match was against Lincoln City, the result 0-0.

boothferrypk

August 12th

On 12th August 1349, the Meaux Abbot and 5 monks died of the Black Death; more were to die – only 10 of the 50 in the community survived. Afterwards, their serfs at Wawne went on strike, and the monks imprisoned them.

On 12th August 1536, North Ferriby Priory was dissolved (Prior and 8 monks, and 34 servants homeless and jobless); the first wave of Henry VIII closures followed an enquiry which found that the prior together with 2 of his canons had allegedly been guilty of fornication and 4 canons of abusing themselves.

On 12th August 1646, Robert Leedes of Molescroft swore an oath in support of Parliament. Having been a supporter of King Charles I, he was considered ‘delinquent’. As well as the oath, he was fined for lands and money worth £90.

On 12th August 1895,  Isaac Leggott, water bailiff, died instantly when a shell exploded at Alexandra Dock, Hull. It was thought to be an unexploded artillery shell, and Leggott had removed the fuse, prior to throwing it in the water. Henry Cook, dock gate man, was also seriously injured.

On 12th August 1987, Ismail Sowan, Hull College researcher, was arrested when police searched his flat in Westbourne Avenue in connection with the death of Palestinian cartoonist Naji al-Ali.  They found assault rifles, bomb-making equipment, explosive and grenades. Sowan, a Mossad agent, was arrested, imprisoned and deported.

 

naji al-ali

August 3rd

On 3rd August 1349, John de Preston was elected Prior of North Ferriby on the death of John de Beverley, himself elected Prior just 10 days earlier on 24thJuly, when he succeeded the previous Prior Walter de Hessell on his death. This outbreak of the Black Death killed 35 out of 95 parish priests in East Yorkshire, and presumably a similar proportion of the general population.

On 3rd August 1523, Thomas Senexer, yeoman, of Holme on Spalding Moor, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt. photo shows the Frith Stool (sanctuary chair)

On 3rd August 1732, Robert Cook was killed when he fell from a wagon at one of the chalk pits in Hutton.

On 3rd August 1798, Press Gang seamen John Sykes and John Burnock or Burnick were killed when attempting to press the crew of the returning whaler Blenheim (& see 2.8). The fight was watched by crowds on the dockside. Capt Mitchinson was charged with murder (& see 31.3) The navy men were buried in Drypool Cemetery.

On 3rd August 1878, for 1d working people could attend a lecture on ‘The Yorkshire Wolds in Prehistory’ as part of Hull Literary and Philosophical Society’s new series of lectures to the working classes in the Exchange Building, aimed at keeping working people occupied during the new Saturday half holiday.

On 3rd August 1942, Mrs Frances Snowden, Lieut Stanley Lawrence and Charles Cross were killed when 4 bombs were dropped on Flemingate, Beverley, damaging Hodgson’s Tannery and destroying a house, a medical centre and a warden’s post. 15 people were injured, some of them machine-gunned by the German bomber.

minster - frith stool.JPG

August 2nd

On 2nd August 1806, Capt Welburn, James Simon, ship’s surgeon, and crew of Hull whaler Blenheim were returning from the Davis Straits when the ship was taken by 2 French frigates, L’Syrene and Le Revenge. The Blenheim was burnt, its crew landed at Pampoule near St Malo, and conveyed to Arras where they were imprisoned. They were later moved to other prisons, and only released in 1814, after years of privation and misery, when the allies entered Paris. Dr Simon was subsequently in practice in Aldborough, Holderness where he died in 1845.

On 2nd August 1860, Hedon Magdalen Fair was finally abolished; in the latter years the owner of the field had to persuade, or bribe, those who wished to attend the fair not to meet there. The event had included a market, music, games, sports, juggling, fire-eaters, and badger baiting.

On 2nd August 1913, Charles William Loten and Terence Charles Carroll, 18, died at Hornsea whilst trying to save a child from drowning. A memorial brass in Hornsea church was paid for by public subscription.

On 2nd August 1916, Joseph Bennett, 17,  died in Hull from bubonic plague. photo shows his memorial in the columbarium, Hedon Road.

plague victim.JPG

June 20th

Hull Corpn silver

 

On 20th June 1533, the Hull Mayor and town council sold to Sir Edmund Perkins the ornaments of the churches in the town, for £15. They also gave to Sir Frauncis Jobson, Treasurer of His Majesty’s jewellers, ’24oz of silver plate whereof 7oz were double gilt and the rest part gilt and plain white, handed over for His Majesty’s use’. photo shows some of today’s corporate treasures.

On 20th June 1579, Edward, son of Nicholas Symson of Thorpe, because of the outbreak of plague at Howden, had to be baptised at Eastrington rather than in the parish church.

On 20th June 1583, Hull agreed to 10s compensation to Richard Frere for the loss of hay and his cote during the time when plague was in the town.

On 20th June 1642, Maurice Corney, vicar of St Mary’s Hull and Capt William Thornton, comptroller of customs were discussed by Sir William Strickland, Mr Alured, Mr Peregrine Pelham and Mr John Hotham, as a danger to Parliament’s cause. Sir John Hotham ejected Corney from the town, and he left for York, despite being considered a hero for his work during the recent plague. Thornton was also turned out, and joined the King’s service.

On 20th June 1645, John Blenkarne, master of the Hull ship Anne Dorothy, was moored in Marstrand, Sweden. He accused crewmen Peacock and Dynnis of inciting mutiny when they came aboard drunk, threatened him, and after a night in custody refused to come aboard until threatened with imprisonment. When they returned to home port, the court of Trinity House fined them and jailed them for 24 hours.

On 20th June 1761, Beverley widow Elizabeth Courtney, of Walkergate, paid the bellman to go round the town announcing a reward of 3 guineas to anyone with information about bricks thrown through her windows the previous night.

On 20th June 1810, Hull Trinity House reported raising £300 in 9 weeks towards establishing a lifeboat at Spurn.

On 20th June 1895, an auction was held in 2 fields in Bransholme Lane, Sutton, of ‘The Sweep of the Scythe’ of 25 acres of ‘rich meadow’, and also the ‘Eatage of the Fog’ up to the end of the year. This appears to have been dialect for the sale of hay cut for fodder for cattle.