June 20th

Hull Corpn silver

 

On 20th June 1533, the Hull Mayor and town council sold to Sir Edmund Perkins the ornaments of the churches in the town, for £15. They also gave to Sir Frauncis Jobson, Treasurer of His Majesty’s jewellers, ’24oz of silver plate whereof 7oz were double gilt and the rest part gilt and plain white, handed over for His Majesty’s use’. photo shows some of today’s corporate treasures.

On 20th June 1579, Edward, son of Nicholas Symson of Thorpe, because of the outbreak of plague at Howden, had to be baptised at Eastrington rather than in the parish church.

On 20th June 1583, Hull agreed to 10s compensation to Richard Frere for the loss of hay and his cote during the time when plague was in the town.

On 20th June 1642, Maurice Corney, vicar of St Mary’s Hull and Capt William Thornton, comptroller of customs were discussed by Sir William Strickland, Mr Alured, Mr Peregrine Pelham and Mr John Hotham, as a danger to Parliament’s cause. Sir John Hotham ejected Corney from the town, and he left for York, despite being considered a hero for his work during the recent plague. Thornton was also turned out, and joined the King’s service.

On 20th June 1645, John Blenkarne, master of the Hull ship Anne Dorothy, was moored in Marstrand, Sweden. He accused crewmen Peacock and Dynnis of inciting mutiny when they came aboard drunk, threatened him, and after a night in custody refused to come aboard until threatened with imprisonment. When they returned to home port, the court of Trinity House fined them and jailed them for 24 hours.

On 20th June 1761, Beverley widow Elizabeth Courtney, of Walkergate, paid the bellman to go round the town announcing a reward of 3 guineas to anyone with information about bricks thrown through her windows the previous night.

On 20th June 1810, Hull Trinity House reported raising £300 in 9 weeks towards establishing a lifeboat at Spurn.

On 20th June 1895, an auction was held in 2 fields in Bransholme Lane, Sutton, of ‘The Sweep of the Scythe’ of 25 acres of ‘rich meadow’, and also the ‘Eatage of the Fog’ up to the end of the year. This appears to have been dialect for the sale of hay cut for fodder for cattle.

 

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