December 14th

Ebberston Yorks Aelfrids Memorial

 

On 14th December 704, the Anglo Saxon Chronicle records, King Aldfrith of Northumbria died in battle at Ebberston and was buried at Little Driffield. A man of great learning, educated for a career in the church, but he succeeded to the throne when his brother died. A memorial to him, called King Alfred’s Stone, is at Ebberston, North Yorks. Driffield may have been a royal seat of the Saxon kings. (sources vary as to his exact dates)

On 14th December 1610, an anonymous tinker was invited in to Londesborough House, home of the Earl of Cumberland, to mend broken pans and was paid 3s4d by the clerk of the kitchen.

On 14th December 1660, surgeon Joseph Thornnton was granted a licence to practice in Hull, after being invited to move from Great Horton, West Riding, to deal with a typhus outbreak. 18 people signed a testimonial to his effectiveness.

On 14th December 1775, Hull Corporation delegated its responsibility to provide a town dump to the official Town Scavenger; the condition of the Spring Ditch soon gave cause for concern, and in 1777 a bank was built to stop dung and rubbish entering the water.

September 19th

On 19th September 1069, Northumbrians (incl Morcar and Edwin) with help of Danes besieged York and took Sir Wm Mallet hostage; in retaliation, William razed York to the ground and began the Harrying of the North. In effect, this was ethnic cleansing; some villages in the East Riding were still worth a fraction of their value 20 years later, or simply described as ‘waste’.

On 19th September 1532, William Orrell, a gentleman from Hull, was recorded as having been in the sanctuary of Westminster Abbey for about a year.  He had confessed to murdering Hull merchant John Lownde and was involved in complex legal questions as to whether he was an outlaw or not. He lobbied the King for restoration of his properties and positions, and by the 1540s was described as a gentleman of the King’s household.

On 19th September 1576, orders were given by Mayor and aldermen in York that the  house and shop of Gregory Burgess, physician & apothecary, should be shut up, probably because he had moved to Hull the previous year to treat people suffering from plague; and that he should be banned from entering York until further orders.

On 19th September 1674, bricklayer/builder William Catlyn, was elected Sheriff of Hull, but petitioned the town, pleading that his work took him to Lincolnshire, and he was unable to carry out the post. His petition seems to have succeeded, but he eventually became sheriff in 1683. Catlyn was responsible for building Wilberforce House, Crowle House, the Charterhouse and Master’s House (1628-1709). Brother of John Catlyn, Master of Hull Grammar School. photo shows Crowle House

On 19th September 1935, Herbert Morrison MP, and later High Steward of Hull, officially opened Queens Gardens, formed after the Queen’s Dock was closed in 1930. On the same day, the Wilberforce Monument, which had been moved from Monument Bridge, was rededicated by Wilberforce’s great granddaughter, Mrs Arnold Reckitt (nee Ann Barbara Wilberforce). Another relative of Morrison’s, Lord Peter Mandelson, later became High Steward of Hull.Crowle House