December 14th

Ebberston Yorks Aelfrids Memorial

 

On 14th December 704, the Anglo Saxon Chronicle records, King Aldfrith of Northumbria died in battle at Ebberston and was buried at Little Driffield. A man of great learning, educated for a career in the church, but he succeeded to the throne when his brother died. A memorial to him, called King Alfred’s Stone, is at Ebberston, North Yorks. Driffield may have been a royal seat of the Saxon kings. (sources vary as to his exact dates)

On 14th December 1610, an anonymous tinker was invited in to Londesborough House, home of the Earl of Cumberland, to mend broken pans and was paid 3s4d by the clerk of the kitchen.

On 14th December 1660, surgeon Joseph Thornnton was granted a licence to practice in Hull, after being invited to move from Great Horton, West Riding, to deal with a typhus outbreak. 18 people signed a testimonial to his effectiveness.

On 14th December 1775, Hull Corporation delegated its responsibility to provide a town dump to the official Town Scavenger; the condition of the Spring Ditch soon gave cause for concern, and in 1777 a bank was built to stop dung and rubbish entering the water.

December 10th

On 10th December 1621, Thurley Cammiskish, servant at Londesborough House, was given £10 p.a. for life when he left the employ of the Earl of Cumberland; this may have been more than he earned, but he would no longer receive board, lodgings, clothing and perks of the job.

On 10th December 1889, James Reckitt public library (which bears the name of its founder and donor), opened – Hull’s first free library.  Reckitt donated over 8,000 books, and gave the library to Hull Corporation in 1892. The building was designed by Sir Alfred Gelder.

On 10th December 1920, Gerald Thomas was born in Hull. Film director, mainly known for directing 31 Carry On films. (d 9.11.1993)

Carry On

 

December 2nd

On 2nd December 1614, a woman bone-setter from South Dalton set the leg of John the gardener at Londesborough House after he had broken it in a fall from a horse. The Earl of Cumberland paid the costs of his servants’ medical treatment.

On 2nd December 1847, Memiadluk and Uckaluk, of Cumberland Sound, Greenland, gave the first of several exhibitions of their traditional clothing, kayak and hunting equipment on their British trip to raise money and awareness of the plight of their people. Greenlanders were being encouraged to use modern hunting equipment, but supplies were irregular with no permanent British settlement. Photo shows their statues at the side of the River Hull.

On 2nd December 1985, Philip Larkin, poet and librarian, died in hospital in Cottingham of oesophageal cancer at the age of 63. Librarian, University of Hull 1955-85. CBE, Companion of Honour., Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry. (born 9.8.1922 Coventry)

 

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November 18th

On 18th November 1620, the son of Thomas Peirson of Shipton (now Shiptonthorpe) hoped for a post in the kitchen at Londesborough House, the seat of Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland. Either he was not suitable, or there was no post available. He was given 12d costs as compensation. Posts were usually filled by personal recommendation, often from families who had worked in the house in the past.

On 18th November 1910, Benjamin Bolton, aged 48, of 5 Suffolk Terrace, Hornsea, died after falling from a moving train near Brough.  A prominent Hornsea citizen, member of the Conservative Party and member of Hornsea Music Union, he played cricket for Hull, Hornsea & Yorkshire and bowled out W G Grace. The inquest returned a verdict of accidental death. (b23.9.1862 Cottingham)

On 18th November 1938, Sir Henry Joseph Wood, founder of the Proms, resigned as conductor of the Hull Philharmonic Society after 15 years. The committee considered Sir Malcolm Sargent as his replacement, but he was not available. Basil Cameron was engaged. photo shows the orchestra in Hull City Hall

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October 22nd

On 22nd October 1517, John Cook, yeoman of Sewerby, claimed sanctuary after assaulting labourer Thomas Stowpes and fled to Flambrough church.  This was not a registered place of sanctuary, but was called ‘taking church’. At a Coroner’s inquest at Sewerby on 5.11.1517, the jurors reported that Cook assaulted Stowpes on 22 Oct, giving him a wound from which he died 3 days later.

On 22nd October 1611, Lady Margaret Clifford, daughter of the Earl of Cumberland and Thomas Wentworth, future baronet, were married at All Saints, Londesborough. The Earl’s finances were not healthy, due to a protracted legal dispute with Lady Anne Clifford over his inheritance, so the celebrations were low-key, with only 40 in attendance, and a simple dinner of pasties, mince pies and turkey, a speciality of the estate. The artist Augustine Harrison was present, so that the Earl could present his 2 daughters with identical portraits of himself. photo shows Londesbrough church

On 22nd October 1882, William Butler, 16, 4thhand, was lost overboard from Hull trawler Sportsman in the North Sea.

On 22nd October 1972, the new Queen Elizabeth Dock container terminal was opened.

 

Londesborough

 

June 7th

On 7th June 1614, Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, of Londesborough House, paid for the apprenticeship of his scullery-maid Grace. He trained in London as a barber-surgeon for 7 years, and the Earl continued to support him when he had to transfer employers, as his first employer killed a man (perhaps in the course of treatment).

On 7th June 1672, the residents of Sister-Kirks (Owthorne and Withernsea) reported hearing the sound of the naval battle of Solebay, off the coast of Suffolk. A fleet of 75 Dutch ships surprised a fleet of 93 Anglo-French ships at anchor.

On 7th June 1796, Sir Henry Etherington laid the foundation stone of Hull Anti-Mill, to provide cheaper flour. An early co-operative, it was funded by subscription by poor residents finding the price of flour beyond their reach.

On 7th June 1837, the Union steam packet was in the Humber basin, Hull, Preparing to cross the Humber, when it exploded. 3 other ferries were next to it; 23 people died. The engineer was later charged, but not convicted.

On 7th June 1915, Vere Campey Marshall made a statement to police, stating that he witnessed a 1,000 strong crowd outside the premises of Kress and Wagner, 163/5 Spring Bank, throwing stones, and a girl using a hammer to break a window. Police and military were sent to guard the premises. Anti-German feeling was strong during WW1.

June 5th

On 5th June 1618, ‘Blind Richie’ (Richard Graham of Millhill) had walked from the Scottish borders to seek help from Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, at Londesborough, and was given a pension of 10s a year. It is not known what his relationship was to the Earl, who had lands on the Scottish border.

On 5th June 1778, Beilby Thompson of Escrick created a deer park, and demolished most of the village houses, rebuilding them out of sight of the Hall, and recycling the bricks; he paid 5s to Mr Scott the millwright for demolishing the horse mill.

On 5th June 1854, Dr Playfair, from the Dept of Science, reported on the teaching at Hull Trinity House School that no geometry or algebra was taught; geography was badly taught; no empirical data given on laws regulating winds, currents and weather.

On 5th June 1915, German Lieut-Capt Boemack made the first Zeppelin air raid on Yorkshire, dropping bombs on Driffield and Hedon before aborting the mission. There were no casualties, although house windows were broken in Beckside, Driffield, and crops were damaged. Crowds of people flocked to Driffield the following day to view the damage.

 

beilby thompson