October 31st

On 31st October 1640, the gentry of Cottingham, Swanland and other villages petitioned Sir John Conyers to remove his regiment to other quarters, as they were eating up all their cattle fodder and supplies, and many other ‘insupportable damages and dangers’. Many troops had already been removed from Hull into the surrounding villages for similar reasons. The petition was not successful, although the troops did look for other quarters.

On 31st October 1646, Sir Robert Hildyard of Patrington was fined £610 as a Royalist (delinquent) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament. He was a member of the King’s Privy Council.

On the same day, Michael Wharton of Beverley was fined £1,600 for the same reason. He had been a captain in the Royalist army.

On 31st October 1793, John Woodhead, mason, was killed at work on the building site of the Neptune Inn, Whitefriargate. Hull Trinity House gave his widow a gratuity of £5 5s.

On 31st October 1833, the Humber pilots’ work for that day included taking men from Trinity House to relay the Bull buoy.

On 31st October 1929, George Jackson Bentham died suddenly, while boarding a train home, in the company of a young lady not his wife. Hull city councillor, JP, and MP for Gainsborough, he was the son of the founder of Wm Jackson & Son, and the company’s managing director. He changed his name by deed poll to that of his Liberal hero, Jeremy Bentham.

 

Pilot Office

September 14th

On 14th September 1484, Anne de la Pole, great granddaughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, was betrothed aged 8 to the Duke of Rothesay, future King James IV of Scotland, as part of peace negotiations between the 2 countries. Her brother John, 1stEarl of Lincoln, was then Heir Presumptive to the English throne. Anne never became Queen, however, as on the death of her uncle Richard III, she was sent to a convent and became a nun at the Abbey of Syon.

On 14th September 1581, the Hull Mayor and aldermen agreed to pay 12d per week towards the keep in God’s House (i.e. the Charterhouse) of keelman Christofer Harrison, on account of his being blind and aged.

On 14th September 1643, Sir Thomas Fairfax, Hull governor, opened the sluice gates to flood all areas from Derringham Dyke to Dunswell, during the 2nd siege of Hull, to keep the royalist guns away from the town.

On 14th September 1828, Thomas Thompson MP died aged 72. A Methodist and member of the Clapham Sect, he provided land to poor families to keep them out of the workhouse. Wrote History of Church & Priory of Swine. Father of Thomas Perronet Thompson. (b 5.4.1754  Swine)

On 14th September 1853, Hugh Edward Strickland went to examine railway cuttings near Retford, and stepped out of the way of a goods train and was killed by a train coming from the opposite direction. Inventor of the power loom, ornithologist and geologist, Fellow of the Royal Society. (b2.3.1811 Reighton)

On 14th September 1861, John Kingston, chimney sweeper and soot dealer of 16 Worship St, Hull, gave his annual bill to Hull Charterhouse for £5 for sweeping chimneys, with a note that his prices would rise in the following year due to a new law forbidding sending children up chimneys to clean them.

 

childsweep2

June 23rd

Ezekiel Rogers window

Ezekiel Rogers window, Rowley church.

On 23rd June 1660, Reverend Ezekiel Rogers died aged 70, in Rowley, Massachusetts, after 22 years as vicar of a new Puritan settlement.  The new town was named after Rowley in East Yorkshire, from where he led a group of about 100 Puritans to America in June 1638. Became Rector of Rowley in 1621, aged 31, and served there for 17 years. (b 1590 in Wethersfield, Essex)

On 23rd June 1766, Sara Jenkinson, the infant daughter of Richard Jenkinson of Hutton Cranswick, fell from a little girl’s arms and died within 30 minutes. There was a coroner’s inquest.

On 23rd June 1768, John Courtney, aged 34, gentleman, of Beverley, married Mary Jesse Smelt, aged 24, at St Mary’s, Lowgate. The bride dressed in a white ‘night gown’ and white hat, the groom in a white suit. Only family and servants attended the church and family members dined with them afterwards. The bells of both churches rang for them. They returned to their future home in Beverley in the evening. In his diary, John refers to his future wife at all times as ‘Miss Smelt’.

On 23rd June 1787, the Clerk to the Beverley to Driffield Turnpike Trust wrote to T. Baxter, the owner of Bell Mills, Sunderlandwick, threatening him with prosecution if he allowed anyone to cross his land to avoid paying tolls. 2 months later the Trust asked T. Baxter to lock the gate near his mill, and to prosecute anyone who broke it down.

On 23rd June 1812, Major-General Barnard Foord Bowes of Cowlam was wounded at Battle of Badajoz, but recovered to fight at Salamanca.

On 23rd June 1848, Uckaluk died of measles aboard the Hull ship Truelove, on their way home to Nyadlik, Greenland. She and her husband Memiadluk had visited England to highlight the poor conditions in their homeland.  They took part in talks in Manchester and York. 

On 23rd June 1853, Captain John (or Thomas) Bowlby set sail for Cumberland Sound in the Arctic with 3 ships, with the aim of forming a settlement there; they took goats and building materials. The surgeon on the trip was William Gedney, who had been on board the Truelove with Captain Parker in 1847.

On 23rd June 1898, Winifred Holtby was born at Rudston. Social reformer, novelist and journalist, she was famous and respected for her work in South Africa and elsewhere. ‘South Riding’ became her most famous novel, published after her death. She is buried in Rudston. (d 29.9.1935)

June 9th

On 9th June 1786, a servant of Rev George Lambert of Hull gave notice that she was leaving after living with the family for 15 years, to live with a sailor who had recently sold his wife to another man. Most people considered this equivalent to divorce, although it had no status in law.

On 9th June 1888, a water spout in Langtoft sucked up mud and stones, and removed the soil from gardens, leaving bare chalk, as it moved across the local valleys. When it was halted by a steep hill, it deposited debris to the depth of 7 feet.

On 9th June 1965, Leslie Anthony Wegg was born in Hedon Road Maternity Hospital, Hull, with a full caul. A fisherman’s son, it was kept as a precious possession, despite a £100 offer to buy it. (from Eric Gill’s book “Superstitions’)

 

May 28th

On 28th May 1554, Beverley priest Robert Thwenge was brought before judges at York for the 4th time on the charge that he had been an ordained priest and had afterwards married. He had married after the Reformation, but before Queen Mary repealed the Act. He said that he would rather continue with his wife, and did not wish to be restored as a minister. The record does not show what happened to him after this. Most priests agreed to separate from their wives and retain their livings after doing penance for their sin.

On 28th May 1721, Ann Watson, widow, of Stoneferry, was buried in St Augustine’s Church, Hedon. She bequeathed her whole estate at Stoneferry to charitable uses. Memorial in the church to the Watson family, including her son Hedon Watson.

On 28th May 1787, Edmund Foster, carver and gilder start a sale of his stock in trade at the Golden Boy, Lowgate, Hull. The sale was expected to last 28 days (not including Sundays). The stock included chimney pieces, gilded looking glasses and ornaments. An early ‘everything must go/closing down’ sale?

On 28th May 1857, Charles Francis Annesley Voysey was born, son of Rev Charles Voysey. Designer in the Arts and Crafts style and architect, winner of RIBA Gold Medal 1940. (d 12.2.1941)

 

Ann Watson memorial