December 23rd

On 23rd December 1226, Robert ‘Furfan’ de Ros, of Roos, died, aged about 54. 1stLord of Helmsley, son-in-law of the Scottish king William the Lion, a Knight Templar and one of the barons enforcing the Magna Carta. His tomb is in the Temple church, London.

On 23rd December 1510, Peter Swake and Roland Dale of Catton claimed sanctuary at the church of St Cuthbert, Durham, as accessories to homicide. About 25.11.1510, they were present when Richard Horsley of Catton was taken from his mother’s house in Catton to a field, where he received several wounds, from which he died about a month later. They feared being  indicted as accessories. On 5.7.1511, another Catton man, William Ratcliff, entered the sanctuary with the same story, although he had taken sanctuary in Beverley for the homicide the previous year.

On 23rd December 1535, Austin Tennant of Hull claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for homicide and felony (details not recorded).  On the same day, the sanctuary received another 4 fugitives, from Leeds, Wakefield, and Thornton and Tealby in Lincs, 3 for felony and 1 for debt.

On 23rd December 1640, Sir John Lister died in Hull, aged 53. He left land at Thorngumbald to provide income for the poor, and money to set up the almshouses known as Lister’s Hospital. Twice Mayor of Hull, and MP, he built the house now known as Wilberforce House. He is commemorated in Holy Trinity church, where he also left money for repairs.

On 23rd December 1689, Johannes Frederick Bellow, a Danish trooper, was executed in Beverley Market Place for killing fellow soldier Daniel Straker, in a duel. Both are buried in St Mary’s churchyard.

On 23rd December 1732, a hurricane removed the roof and steeple of Hornsea church, destroyed 24 houses and overturned a windmill, and interrupted the parish clerk in the act of concealing smuggled goods in the crypt of the church.

danish soldiers st mary's.JPG

December 20th

On 20th December 1584, Rev John Lothropp was born and baptised in Etton. He became a Congregationalist minister, was imprisoned and released on condition he did not preach or hold meetings. He took some of his congregation with him to America and is considered one of the first American spiritual leaders.

On 20th December 1661, an Act of Parliament was passed to separate the church and parish of Holy Trinity, Hull from Hessle, setting out the responsibility of the town for assessing and collecting a rate from which they should pay the vicar £100 a year.

On 20th December 1830, the Mayor of Hull started a collection for Greenland whalers and their families, after a disastrous season of ship losses and low catches.

 

Holy Trinity

December 13th

thwing meteorite

On 13th December 1760, John Courtney, gentleman, reported in his diary being awoken at midnight by the sound of bells ringing to announce that Hugh Bethell had declared himself a candidate for Parliament. The bells rang all day. A week later, Bethell changed his mind and withdrew his name.  He served as Beverley MP 1768-72.

On 13th December 1795, at 3p.m., a meteorite weighing 56 pounds landed in a field near Wold Cottage, Thwing, home of Capt Edward Topham. It embedded itself 9 inches into the soil, weighing 56lbs, and 3 ft long. Capt Topham displayed the meteorite in London at a charge of 1shilling. He raised a brick obelisk on the landing site (see photo). The meteorite is now in the Natural History Museum, and is the origin of the name of Wold Top Brewery’s ‘Falling Stone bitter’.

On 13th December 1816, Frederick Brown, 60, was buried in Holy Trinity, Hull, after dying in the workhouse. Born in Guinea, he worked as a labourer in a number of jobs in Whitby and Hull. In 1794 he was acquitted of burglary by a Hull jury, apparently a case of being mistaken for another black man.

On 13th December 1830, Joseph Robinson Pease, JP, recorded in his diary an attempt to swear in special constables to deal with the ‘Swing Riots’ by agricultural labourers protesting about high rents, low wages, and the introduction of new machinery. However, they found it difficult to recruit in Cottingham.

On 13th December 1842, Moses Roper, student and escaped slave, gave a lecture at Beverley Guildhall on his personal experience of slavery in the USA, in which he exhibited instruments of torture used on slaves. He lectured extensively and published an autobiography.

On 13th December 1889, John Nicholson reported seeing the “Plough Lads’ (groups of men not hired on farms) going round Beverley, dancing and asking for money or drink. They dressed in ‘motley garb’, with one dressed as a woman with a broom, one (Blether Dick) with a bladder on a stick, one with a coat covered in strips of rag. “Often … at lonely houses they are rude and bold, demanding money or drink in such a way as to terrify the women who have been left at home”.  

December 12th

On 12th December 1303, Hull burgess John Schayl left 20shillings in his will towards the rebuilding of Holy Trinity Church.

On 12th December 1659, James Primrose MD, aged 63, of Whitefriargate, Hull, signed his will, and died sometime in the same month. Raised and educated in France, related to James I’s principal surgeon and Scottish nobility. Prominent writer on medical matters, and highly respected Hull physician. Andrew Marvell referred to him in a poem. A religious nonconformist who was fined for non-attendance at church at least twice.

On 12th December 1895, Robin Pockley, coxswain of th eFlamborough lifeboat, saved the 3 crew of the fishing boat Elizabeth, who had been washed into the sea several miles off Flamborough Head; as there was not enough time to call out the lifeboat, he put out to sea with 2 colleagues in an ordinary fishing boat. He was awarded the RNLI silver medal.

On 12th December 1946, Barrie Rutter was born in Hull. Actor, director and founder of the Northern Broadsides theatre company; awarded OBE for services to drama. photo shows him (middle) in 2017 production of ‘Richard III’.

-Barrie-Rutter-Mat-Fraser

November 11th

Lister's Hospital, S Church Side

 

On 11th November 1642, the building work at the new William Lister’s Hospital in South Church Side, Hull, was inspected. They were surprised to find Mr Gough, Reader at Holy Trinity church, living there, in rooms allocated to the Assistant Preacher, which post was vacant at the time. Eventually, agreement was reached with the Mayor and Aldermen whereby Gough was allowed to remain, and given the post on a temporary basis.  He appears to have still been in post 20 years later. A dispute arose in 1749 over the same rooms, and post, when the trustees decided that the Mayor and aldermen had no power to ‘intermeddle’ this time. photo shows the Hospital

On 11th November 1899, the Evan Fraser Hospital opened at West Carr, Sutton-on-Hull as an isolation hospital for smallpox patients, named after a surgeon and Hull alderman (d.8.4.1906). The hospital replaced the Garrison Hospital on Sammy’s Point. Police were posted outside to prevent access, and the city banned religious services and the loan of library books.

On 11th November 1920, Mr Arthur B. Reckitt unveiled memorial tablets at Reckitt’s Institute, Dansom Lane, Hull, to staff who had died in World War 1. 159 Reckitts employees died.

On 11th November 1942, Abdul Rahman, aged 22, seaman, was lost to enemy action whilst in Merchant Navy on board SS City of Ripon of Hull, in Atlantic convoy.

 

September 8th

On 8th September 1069, the Danish king Sweyn Estrithson and a fleet of 240 ships anchored in the Humber accompanied by Edgar of Wessex who claimed England’s throne. They marched on York.

On 8th September 1292, King Edward I stayed in Beverley on his progress through East Yorkshire. photo shows his statue in Hull Guildhall

On 8th September 1402, William Asleby and other rioters from West Hull villages who had rioted as part of Hull’s ‘water wars’ had to do penance every year on the Friday nearest the Feast of the Nativity of Our Lady, by processing through Holy Trinity church naked, bare-headed and with bare feet, through the church during mass, carrying a 3lb burning candle. If they failed to comply, they would be fined £40 – though none of them had any goods of value.

On 8th September 1667, Richard Leeming, Mayor of Grantham, wrote to the Hull Mayor to notify him of the escape of a prisoner committed for murder supposed to be making for Hull.

On 8th September 1730, an accidental fire destroyed the house of John Mason and Richard Dagger, their goods, clothing and hay, making them destitute and entitled to poor relief from the parish.

Edward I
Guildhall

 

July 8th

On 8th July 1497, Thomas Thompson, labourer of Stamford Bridge, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John ‘for the security of his body’. The register does not state why he was in fear for his life.

On 8th July 1642, King Charles I sent a troop of infantry and cavalry to set fire to windmills outside Hull, aiming to starve the besieged town; they were repulsed. John Shawe, Holy Trinity lecturer said this incident incensed many previously uncommitted Hull people and turned them against the Royalists. Charles also issued a proclamation from ‘our court at Beverley’, part of the continuing ‘paper war’.

On 8th July 1840, the 3rd day of a horse racing meet at the George Inn, Aldbrough, offered prizes up to £4, and included a men’s foot race for a hat valued at 10s, and a wrestling match to win a pair of gloves. In later years, the prizes for the horse race included a purse of gold, saddles and bridles.  However, the field where the sports were held may have been lost to the sea.

On 8th July 1940, Mrs Evelyn Cardwell of East Carlton Farm, Aldbrough, arrested and disarmed a German airman who had parachuted from a crashed bomber. She was presented on 1.8 with the British Empire Medal by King George VI at Marine Hotel, Hornsea.

 

royal visit Hornsea

July 2nd

On 2nd July 1642, the Royalist ship Providence, commissioned by Queen Henrietta Maria, evaded Parliamentary ships by entering Keyingham Creek, which was too narrow for the larger ships, and landed a consignment of arms from Holland for the Royalist army. With help from local people, they unloaded ammunition which was taken to the king at York.

On the same day, the Royalist army secured Hull Bridge, Tickton, on the Beverley side, to prevent attacks from Hull and stop provisions reaching Hull, and evicted constable William Cuthbert and his family at midnight.

On 2nd July 1644, Sir Thomas Metham of Metham near Howden,  died at the Battle of Marston Moor fighting on the Royalist side, captain of the Yorkshire gentlemen volunteers.

On 2nd July 1830, Hull whaler Progress was wrecked in a storm when iced in near the Davis Strait; 19 whalers were wrecked or lost that season, 4 of them from Hull.

On 2nd July 1837, Hull whaler Swan was sighted off Spurn Point as a memorial service was being held in Hull for the crew. They had been away for over a year and had been trapped in ice. 25 of the 48 crew had died.

On 2nd July 1954, Harold Macmillan, Minister of Housing and Local Government, approved the amended Hull Development Plan, regenerating the city after the bomb damage of the war. Hull Georgian Society lamented the loss of buildings such as many on High Street, the whole of Nile Street and houses in Lowgate. Not all of the proposals came about – there was to have been a ‘town park’ open area from Holy Trinity to Princes Dock.

 

June 19th

On 19th June 1256, the Meaux Abbey chronicler reported losing men and oxen at Orwithfleet, south of Patrington. A major flood of the Humber reached as far north as Cottingham, with many lives lost, livestock and fisheries devastated, and land washed into the river.

On 19th June 1607, Thomas Wincop, Master of Hull Charterhouse, bought, with Hull Mayor George Almond and other trustees, land in Haltemprice Wood abutting on the common fields of Willerby, to support the running costs; the Charterhouse already owned substantial property in and around Hull. photo shows Wincop’s memorial in Hull Minster.

On 19th June 1837, Hull Steam Packet Company launched the paddle steamer Victoria at Medley’s shipyard, Hull; she was considered state of the art. A boiler explosion in 1838 killed 5 crew; there was a second explosion the same year; she ran onto rocks in 1852 and was wrecked, with 8 people killed.

On the same day, Rev Joseph Coltman died in Beverley at the age of 60. He was known for his support of local charities, of the emancipation of Catholics, and of the abolition of slavery. Born in Hull, Coltman Street was named for him, as was Beverley’s Coltman Avenue. At 37 stone 8lbs, he was reputed to be the heaviest man in England, and his death may have been caused by his weight. He employed a manservant to turn him in bed, but he fell asleep and Coltman suffocated in his sleep.

On 19th June 1887, to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Jubilee, a state service was held in Holy Trinity church, Hull, the new Market Hall was opened, as was East Park, and there were festivities in all the city’s wards.

On 19th June 1920, Harry Wilkinson of  Lower Union Street, Hull, was seriously injured by 3 gunshots.  He was part of a mob of white people who attacked and damaged several boarding houses where black seamen lived. Tom Toby, a West African fireman, was charged with wounding, but no white people were arrested. Toby’s plea of self defence was accepted, and he was found not guilty. During the same rioting, Murrell Piggott, faced with a 200-strong crowd, had also fired, but his plea of self defence was not accepted, and he was sentenced to 9 months’ hard labour for unlawful wounding.

On 19th June 1940, the East Hull, docks, suburbs, and River Hull corridor experienced the first night-time raid of World War 2.

 

Thomas Whincopp memorial