January 30th

Mary Ward

On 30th January 1499, Robert Colstone of Hull and Marmaduke Pateson of  Flambrough claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley – Colstone for debt and Pateson for the murder at Flambrough of John Mottows.

On 30th January 1645, Mary Ward died aged 60. A cousin of the Wright brothers of Welwick, she spent 5 years living there with her grandmother and spent a further 6 years at Osgodby. She founded the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary and championed women’s education. She was declared Venerable in 2009. (b23.1.1585 Mulwith Yorks) see photo

On 30th January 1901, Beverley Mayor Elwell proclaimed the accession of King Edward VII to a large crowd at the Market Cross, despite bitterly cold weather and a snow storm.

On 30th January 1913, Harry Houdini, escapologist, performed at the Palace Theatre, Hull. He escaped from a canvas sea bag and straps; the challenge was signed by seamen Dan Morris, Tom Carr and Robert Mason.

On 30th January 1983, Captain Derek Wharton of North Sea Ferry Norland spent the day sailing back and forth in Bridlington Bay, having arrived back from service in the Falklands War a little too early for the homecoming celebration planned for 1stFebruary.

Houdini copy

 

 

November 23rd

On 23rd November 1599, the Council in the North made an order that John Gregory should serve as Hull Sheriff, although he had held the office 32 years before in 1567, and had asked to be released. He appears to have been successful in spite of the order.

On 23rd November 1796, John Taylor jnr, member of the Hull Troop of Gentlemen and Yeomanry Cavalry, was unanimously expelled and voted to Coventry for improper conduct. The record does not state what he did. photo shows cavalry of the time.

On 23rd November 1863, at the Howden Martinmas hiring fair, 700 men and 800 women attended, the largest number of any ER town; fairs were also held in Beverley, Bridlington, Driffield, Hedon, Patrington, where farmers and people seeking employment gathered. The church was concerned about the moral issues involved when single women had to parade themselves in public. Traditionally, farmworkers had a week’s holiday, annual wages paid, and there were pleasure fairs.

cavalry1796

November 22nd

On 22nd November 1865, William Stamp, Edward Rodmell, and John Lancaster, of Sutton, appeared at Sproatley Petty Sessions, charged with being drunk and riotous in Sutton. Lancaster was discharged, but Stamp and Rodmell were found guilty and fined 5s with costs of 7s6d.

On 22nd November 1869, Alfred Edward Matthews, known as A.E. Matthews was born in Bridlington. Character actor whose career started in silent films and continued to 1960 (d 25.7. 1960) Clip is from ‘This is Your Life’

 

 

On 22nd November 1907, Emmeline Pankhurst, founder of the Women’s Social and Political Union, spoke to a large crowd of dock workers at Hull Fish Dock on the issue of women’s suffrage. Christopher Pickering invited her to talk to the men assembled indoors too. He said that he was Conservative, but his wife was a Radical.

September 29th

On 29th September 1541, King Henry VIII stayed overnight with the Earl of Northumberland at Leconfield.

On 29th September 1638, the Council in the North wrote to the East Riding Commissioner for Sewers at Hedon complaining of the ruinous condition of the banks of the Humber in Drypool.

On 29th September 1829, some postboys were watering the Archbishop of York’s horses at Bar Dyke, Beverley (next to North Bar) after a trip to Rise; one fell in and was saved from drowning by 2 young men. One of the horses dropped dead, whether from exertion or from drinking the dirty water, the Hull Advertiser did not say.

On 29th September 1947, interpreter Sergeant Wadey, and Sgt Cramer were both killed, together with 7 German prisoners of war, when the Army truck they were driving crashed through the railway crossing gates, and stopped on the track in the path of a train heading for Bridlington. 19 other POWs were injured. They were being transported from POW camp 250 at Thorpe Hall, Rudston.

b.agnes level crossing

September 22nd

On 22nd September 1690, Beverley Corporation gave permission to create a racecourse between the Newbald and Walkington roads. Horse racing had probably taken place on Westwood for 300 years, but this was the first time a course was formally laid out.

On 22nd September 1716, Leonard Chamberlain, draper, died at Hesslewood House, Hessle, and left property and estates in Sutton, Stoneferry, Selby, Dunswell and Hessle and his charitable bequests continue to this day. A Presbyterian, he supported those who had been discriminated against on religious grounds, gave money for educating the poor ‘of whatever persuasion or denomination soever’.  Commemorated in Chamberlain Road and Chamberlain Street, Sutton. photo shows one of the Sutton properties

On 22nd September 1761, to mark the coronation of King George III and Queen Charlotte, Col Duncombe’s Battalion of militia drilled in Beverley Market Place, and fired volleys, while the Corporation held a dinner for the officers, the bells rang, and in the evening there were illuminations.

On 22nd September 1778 was the official opening of The Dock, Hull. (It became known as Queen’s Dock after Victoria visited the city in 1854). The first ship in was the whaler Manchester, decorated all over with flags of the nations, followed by the Favourite, the largest ship in the port at 1,000 tons (burthen). 20,000 spectators were entertained by cannon fire and a musket salute from the garrison, and the great and the good were fed and sumptuously entertained.

On 22nd September 1856, Count de Werdinsky died in Hull aged 53, in abject poverty, after variously representing himself as a Polish count, inventor and doctor. He was a bankrupt, a fraudster, and had several counts of assault and indecent assault against women. His memorial is in the Western Cemetery

On 22nd September 1914, the crews of HMS Aboukir, Cressy and Hogue, 3 Navy cruisers, were sunk by a German u-boat, with the loss of 1,450 lives. This not only led to a public outcry, but also the need to provide for a large number of orphaned children. Some of the children were admitted by Hull’s Sailors’ Children’s Society and put up in its holiday home in Hornsea, as well as in the Newland Homes. By 1915, 108 children of seamen lost in action were admitted, from across the country.

leonard chamberlain sutton.JPG

 

 

September 20th

On 20th September 1188, St John’s church at Beverley and most of the town were damaged by fire. St John’s remains were not found until 1197.

On 20th September 1535, John Colynson and Thomas Savage, yeomen of Holme on Spalding Moor were declared outlaws after spending more than a year in sanctuary in Ripon. They sought sanctuary in 1534, confessing to stealing a horse. Savage confessed to the murder of Amery Burdett, but Colynson did not confess, though a coroner’s jury found them both responsible, and indicted others as accessories.

On 20th September 1769, Felice de Giardini, famous violinist, played at the start of a 3-day festival to celebrate the installation of the new organ at Beverley Minster, the first festival of its type in the north of England. New music by Handel was performed, including the recently completed Messiah; tickets were 2s6d and 5s.

On 20th September 1779, Mr Foster, Bridlington quay master, reported that John Paul Jones’ American squadron of ships had attacked a large fleet of colliers and ran them into the harbour.

On 20th September 1813, Thomas Nutbrown was born in Eastrington.  Probably the same person who, aged 14 in 1828, applied to the Howden poor relief officers for some new clothes, and was granted a second hand coat. He died aged 72 in Leeds Township, Quebec, Canada, on 25 Sept 1885.

On 20th September 1883, Rev Edward Cragg Haynes died aged 62 in Swinefleet, after serving there for 32 years. Born in Barbados, classed as ’free coloured’, had links to the Clapham Sect. Set up a Grammar School in Swinefleet attended among others by Joseph Rank. (christened 3.6.1821)

On 20th September 1902, Stevie Smith was born Florence Margaret Smith in Hull. Poet and novelist, most famous for ‘Not waving but drowning’. D 7.3.1971 see photo

On 20th September 1903, Annie Marshall, 16, domestic servant, from Lissett, was raped, shot twice, suffocated with grass and thrown in the river at Scampston by Charles William Ashton, 19, of Cottingham, farmhand.  Ashton knew her well. He was found guilty of murder and hanged at Hull Prison on 11thDecember the same year.

On 20th September 1954, the Selby to Driffield rail line was closed for regular passenger traffic, a service of one regular non stop train each way plus occasional summer excursions ran until June 1965. The line was abandoned after the last freight train ran later that year.

On 20th September 1955, Robert Greenwood Tarran, of the Wolds, Beverley High Road, Hull, died aged 63. Civil engineering contractor, and founder of Tarran Industries Ltd, former Sheriff of Hull, and chief Air Raid Warden during WW2. He moved the Wilberforce monument, at his own expense, and was responsible for building 20,000 prefabs after the war. He was also suspected of complicity in profiting from deals over council land in Endike Lane, in a law case during which his colleague Digby Willoughby committed suicide.

StevieSmith

September 16th

On 16th September 1643, an artilleryman with a lighted match blew up the magazine at Hull North blockhouse and killed himself and 4 others.

On 16th September 1698, Robert Prudom established, and was the first pastor of, the first Baptist chapel in East Yorkshire. The building in Applegarth Lane, Bridlington is only 12 feet square. see photo

On 16th September 1829, Dr John Alderson, MD died aged 71, physician to Hull Infirmary from 1795. A polymath, he was one of the founders of the Hull Literary and Philosophical Society, and of the London Geological Society, wrote acclaimed works on fever and paralysis, established Sculcoates Refuge, (which eventually became De la Pole Hospital), and wrote on agriculture, geology, and supernatural apparitions. The funeral of this popular doctor attracted 12-15,000 mourners. He was buried in a family vault at St Mary’s Sculcoates. His statue can be seen on Anlaby Road. (b 1758 Lowestoft)

On 16th September 1846, George Hudson, MP and ‘railway king’ stayed overnight at Sutton on Hull, went to Bridlington Quay for breakfast, back to Hull, then travelled to Northampton. Joseph Robinson Pease marvelled that such a journey within 13 hours would have been unthinkable 20 years before.

Applegarth La chapel

August 17th

On 17th August 1377, King Richard II issued a charter allowing the town of Hull to ensure the town walls and moats were kept in good repair, and to compel every householder to contribute to the cost of repair.

On 17th August 1427, Thomas Brygman, vicar of Foston, asked the Pope to relax the penances paid by those who did not visit church on holy days or give alms, because the church buildings were ruinous, and lacking a bell tower to call parishioners to prayer, and because the parishioners were too poor to repair the church. Their poverty was caused by ‘divers burdens’ imposed by King Henry to fight wars, and also because of the high mortality level in the area.

On 17th August 1863, Dr T.T. Pierson of Bridlington Quay apologised for signing a certificate at The Retreat asylum, Kilham, to declare a woman insane (whom he had known since they were at school) at the request of her husband; she turned out to be suffering only from the effects of alcohol.

On 17th August 1905, Hull merchant Frederick Harker was fined £2 plus costs for speeding at Harpham – travelling at 28 miles per hour in a 20mph zone. It was reported that the method used, of 3 police officers timing him over a measured distance, had not been used before.

On 17th August 1920, Sir Luke White, MP, died at Driffield, aged 75. Liberal MP for Buckrose since 1900, he died a pauper and under investigation for bankruptcy, having covered his political expenses by using money entrusted to him by the clients of his business as a solicitor.

On 17th August 1954, workers at King George Dock, Hull, began a strike against unsafe working conditions called the ‘Filling Strike’; within hours, 4,000 dockers were on strike and 60 ships lay idle. The strike ended after 11 days.

 

1954 dock strike

July 26th

On 26th July 1826, the Aire & Calder Navigation Company officially opened the new canal at Goole, locks for ships and barges, dock, and canal basin linking Goole to the west. A new town was built around the small hamlet of Goole (population in 1822: 450).

On 26th July 1845, Capt Dannatt and crew of Hull whaler Prince of Wales came across Sir John Franklin and his expedition to find the North West Passage, in Lancaster Sound, in the Arctic, and invited him and his officers on board. This was the last known sighting of the expedition.

On 26th July 1850, Hull Advertiser printed a report of the deaths by drowning during a riot of 4 Irish navvies (Patrick Langthon, John Dowling, Barney M’Jay and Thomas Twomey) working on the embankment of Sunk Island.

On 26th July 1986, 8 rail passengers and 1 person travelling in a van died when the van was struck by the 9.33 Bridlington to Hull train at Lockington level crossing, and the train was derailed. 51 people were injured, 10 of them seriously. There is a memorial to those who died in Driffield Memorial Garden.

 

lockington crash memorial

July 10th

On 10th July 1157, Eustace FitzJohn, Lord of Alnwick, died this day.  He acquired substantial lands in the north, and married into the ER family of de Vescy. Fought on the Scottish side in the Battle of the Standard in 1138. Founded priories in Bridlington, Watton and North Ferriby.

On 10th July 1508, John Tod of Swine claimed sanctuary at the church of St Cuthbert, Durham, for the theft of a horse and 5 marks from chaplain N. Dale, the steward of the Lord of Hastings, and also for debt. As he claimed the theft happened 10 years earlier, presumably the debt concerned him more.

On 10th July 1642, Sir John Meldrum arrived in Hull by boat with 500 Parliamentary troops, and money, to support the town being besieged in the 1st siege of Hull. A further 1,500 troops were sent later.

On 10th July 1869, Mr Tasker of Sheffield was found guilty at Bridlington of shooting 28 protected seabirds, and fined 2s6d for each bird killed, plus 9s costs.

On 10th July 1931, Paul Robeson, singer, actor and political activist,  performed at Bridlington Spa Royal Hall on his first trip to Yorkshire,  receiving several encores; when the Royal Hall re-opened after refurbishment in 1933, he returned to Bridlington.

gannets