April 20th

On 20th April 1602, Robert Watkinson of Hemingbrough, aged 23, was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn, London, as a Catholic priest; he was arrested almost immediately on returning to England after ordination at Arras, France.

On 20th April 1803, a sloop was ‘burnt to the water’s edge’ in Hedon harbour.

On 20th April 1808, Thomas Wilbe, 31, of Hull, was hanged at York Castle for raping a girl under 10 years old.

On 20th April 1892, former pupil of Hull Trinity House School, and Chief Officer of the Elliot of Caernarvon, William Henry Ansell, 29, died of yellow fever at Santos.

On 20th April 1976, Rev Wm Whitehead, on the 190thanniversary of the first recorded measurement of distance from Mappleton church to the sea, recorded the distance to the cliff edge.  At 898 ft 10”, it was almost exactly 1,000 feet less than in 1786, an average of 5ft 3” p.a.  Film clip: https://www.bbc.co.uk/education/clips/z8jfb9q

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April 14th

On 14th April 1511, Walter Rugbe of Paull, a cooper, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of mariner Anthony Dowre of Boulogne.

On 14th April 1524, Sir Robert Constable of Flamborough, with 100 men, attacked the Rokebys’ manor house in Bishop Burton and abducted Ann Cresacre in a complex dispute over land and marriage agreements. Ann was 12 yearsold and an orphan. The case was heard in the Star Chamber. Ann eventually married the son of Sir Thomas More.  A descendant was the City Architect of Hull, Joseph Hirst. photo shows Holbein’s study for his picture of the More family – Ann is standing, rear.

On 14th April 1571, William Strickland of Boynton, MP, a leading Puritan, presented a Bill  to Parliament to reform the prayer book, including abolishing confirmation and the wearing of priests’ vestments.

On 14th April 1702, Jeremiah Northend was buried, aged 78 in Rowley. Aged 14, he had emigrated to Massachusetts with his Uncle Robert and cousin Ezekiel, with the dissenting community led by Rev Ezekiel Rogers, but returned home after about 9 years. Lived in Little Weighton. (b 26.9.1624).

Study_More_familyHans_Holbein

April 13th

On 13th April 1280, Richard de Vescy, also known as Kesham, was offered the post of Rector of North Ferriby by Lady Agnes de Vescy, but Archbishop Wickwane ran a campaign to remove illegitimate clergy, and declined.  Richard de Vescy and several supporters occupied the church, seized its property, and beat up priests and clerks trying to obtain possession ‘almost to death’. The archbishop did not recover the church until October, and ordered some of the supporters to perform penance.  2 years later, Richard de Vesci was appointed rector of Escrick.

On 13th April 1563, Hull Mayor John Smith presided over a council meeting that agreed that no ships in the Haven should carry a fire or lit candle at night on pain of a fine; this was imposed after a vessel called the Dragon was set alight by negligence, and put other ships nearby in danger. A further law was passed in 1584 prohibiting the heating of tar on board ships, and all gunpowder had to be offloaded within 24 hours of docking, on pain of 8 days in prison, and a 20shilling fine.

On 13th April 1743, Mary Maister (nee Cayley) , her baby son and 2 maidservants, died in a fire at the original Maister House, High Street, Hull, which spread quickly up the wooden staircase.  Henry Maister rebuilt the house the following year with a stone staircase. This National Trust property is currently closed.

On 13th April 1838, Hull & Selby Railway ran an excursion from Selby to Hull, returning the same day.  From Howdendike to Hull by packet boat, arriving Hull 1.00, leaving again 5.00p.m. First class and best cabin 8shillings, 2ndclass & common cabin 6shillings.

On 13th April 1886, Ethel Leginska, nee Liggins, was born in Pemberton Street, Sutton-on-Hull. A musical child prodigy,  she made her debut performance as a pianist on her 9thbirthday, at St George’s Hall, Hull, and was playing in London’s Queen’s Hall the following year. At 11, she went to study in Frankfurt. She was a concert pianist, conductor, teacher and composer. She established the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra, Boston English Opera company, and National Women’s Symphony Orchestra, and was director of Chicago Women’s Symphony Orchestra. (d 26.2.1970) . She was the first woman to conduct many of the world’s leading orchestras, first woman to conduct grand opera (her own opera), and a pioneer for women in music.

Ethel Leginska

 

April 12th

On 12th April 627AD, King Edwin of Northumbria convened his Great Council at  Londesborough and agreed to adopt Christianity; King Edwin’s high priest Coifi destroyed the pagan temple at Goodmanham.

On 12th April 1748, William Kent (orig Cant) died aged 63 . This Bridlington-born architect and polymath, originator of the English style of landscape gardening, also introduced the Palladian style of architecture to England.  His buildings include Treasury Buildings and Horseguards, both in Whitehall, and Holkham Hall. (bapt 1.1.1686) photo shows his house in Bridlington old town

On 12th April 1855, John Enderby Jackson’s  ‘The Withernsea Quadrilles’ were played for the first time at a ball to celebrate the opening of  Withernsea’s first hotel, Queens Hotel, for visitors travelling on the new Hull to Withernsea rail line. Before the railway opened the previous year, the village population was tiny (108 in 1801), with 1 inn, and farming was the main occupation.

William Kent's house

April 8th

King Henry V

On 8th April 1421, King Henry V presided over state business while at Howden, probably at the Bishop’s Palace.

On 8th April 1586, Sir Christopher Hilyarde, William Pailer and Hugh Bethell supervised an inquiry into concealed lands and premises in Hull. Amongst numerous premises found concealed were the “Old Schoolhouse’, a tenement occupied by the schoolmaster and the new schoolhouse.

On 8th April 1586, Sir Francis Walsingham, principal secretary to Elizabeth I, wrote to the Hull Mayor recommending Dr Hudson of York for the post of assessor in the Hull Admiralty Court. He seems to have got the job.

 

April 7th

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On 7th April 1615, George Goodgion, senior servant to Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, ordered tenants to cart coals to the big house, which was out of fuel, and to note the names of those who refused. Tenants were required in their leases to do this work, but had to fit it in with their own farming work.

On 7th April 1643, Sir John Hotham wrote several letters to people on the Parliament side; the post for London was captured, and his letters published by the Royalists at Oxford, revealing his double-dealing.

On 7th April 1787, John Morrit, 34, was hanged at York for murdering John Argyle, aka Roundell, of Howden.

On 7th April 1810, Mr William Iveson, Steward to Francis Constable of Burton Constable, proposesd to Hull Trinity House to erect a lifeboat house on Spurn Point, provide 12 crew from Kilnsea, and open a tavern to create an income for the boat’s master.

On 7th April 1828, Joseph Robinson Pease, JP, made his first committal as JP in Cottingham, of a man who disobeyed an Order of Bastardy, i.e. he was jailed for refusing to pay maintenance for an illegitimate child.

On 7th April 1893, a rioting Hull mob destroyed 37 bags of carrots being taken on rullies to the docks, and used them as missiles to attack the police.

On 7th April 1943, pupils at Paull Primary School escaped unhurt when a barrage balloon escaped its mooring in the Humber, and exploded, setting fire to the school building.

 

March 30th

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On 30th March 1693, John Frame’s shipyard at Hessle Cliffs launched the man-of-war, the Humber, for the Navy, of 1205 tons, carrying 490 men and 80 guns. John Wilson Carmichael’s painting of the shipyard at Hessle Cliffs is in Ferens Art Gallery

On 30th March 1757, Mary Ellah of Broomfleet was hanged at York Castle, and her body burnt, for murdering her husband.

On 30th March 1782, scaffolding collapsed while builders were installing a roof beam in the new Congregational Chapel in Fish Street, Hull; 5 men fell to the ground, 3 of them seriously injured.

On 30th March 1851, the census figures recorded that more than half of the Hull population did not attend church on the given date, and that around 15% of the population described themselves as Church of England. (N.B. figures may have serious omissions, e.g. prisons, workhouses).

On 30th March 1860, the Turner’s Trust (Beverley) charity was registered as part of the will of printer Matthew Turner, to distribute sums of £10 10s each to well conducted, honest, deserving, sober and discreet domestic servants. At its first distribution in 1862, there were 240 applicants, of whom 68 were successful. The charity still operates. Turner is buried in Coronation Gardens.