July 14th

On 14th July 1746, William Pulteney, MP for Hedon, Baron Hedon and the Earl of Bath, stepped down when after “48 hours, three quarters, seven minutes, and eleven seconds” he failed to form a government, and is now reckoned to be England’s shortest-serving Prime Minister. photo shows his portrait in Hedon Town Hall.

On 14th July 1873, Hull hosted the Royal Agricultural Show at Newington, on the site of the former race course; the event has been held at Stoneleigh since 1963.

On 14th July 1943, Ernest Wilson of Hutt Street, Air Raid Warden, and Charles Henry Burgess rescued Mr Cherry from his home in Leonard Street, Hull, during an air raid. Wilson was later awarded the British Empire Medal.

On 14th July 2007, (Florence) Eva Crackles, MA, MBE,  died aged 89. Botanist and teacher; Honorary Doctor of Science, Univ of Hull 1991; Fellow of the Linnean Socy; and Honorary Life member Botanical Societyy of Britain & Ireland. Some of her work can be seen on the external wall of the Wilberforce Health Centre, and she is commemorated by a cream plaque. (born 23.1.1918)

Wm Pulteney, Hedon MP

July 12th

On 12th July 1537, Robert Aske of Aughton was hanged in chains outside Cliffords Tower, York, after being convicted of treason in Westminster, as the leader of the Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 12th July 1641, Sir Thomas Glemham resigned his post as Governor of Hull, having only been appointed the previous year.

On 12th July 1714, Elizabeth Hodgson, a single woman of Hedon, was sentenced at Hedon Quarter Sessions to be stripped to the waist and whipped with birch or willows from the Town Hall to Harrison Lane and from there to the jail and to remain in jail at hard labour until ‘sufficient security’ was found for her good behaviour. Her crime was to give birth to her 4thillegitimate child. There is no record of any punishment for the father. An Act of 1792 forbade whipping females for any reason whatsoever.

On 12th July 1826, (in one of the driest summers on record) Hessle banker Joseph Robinson Pease recorded in his diary there was no grass for the cattle, who had to be given linseed cake. Ponds and water tanks dry.  Around this time, too, the pond at Fridaythorpe dried up, and villagers went on a Sunday to nearby Fimber to take water from one of their 2 ponds, resulting in a pitched battle, referred to as ‘the Second Battle of Waterloo’. photo shows the remaining village pond at Fimber.

fimber pond.JPG

July 5th

On 5th July 1532, Henry VIII’s charter was read out in Hull Market Place, and prohibited anyone but Hull burgesses from conducting business in the port; the corporation paid £31 19s4d to obtain the charter, part of which was paid in the form of a sturgeon for Thomas Cromwell.

On 5th July 1657, a major fire in Hedon starting at 1 a.m. resulted in the loss of 42 houses, and others damaged. In August, the Mayor petitioned Parliament for permission to hold a collection to raise money; £4,000 was raised.

On 5th July 1776, John Wesley paid a visit to Howden and preached to a large congregation during a thunderstorm near Station Road, Howden. Wesley’s picture below

On 5th July 1811, Bridlington Collector of Customs Benjamin Milne discovered a tidal spring near the quay, now commemorated by a stone inscription.

On 5th July 1899, Hull Alderman Larard took the controls of the city’s first municipal electric tram (Siemens Bros & Co provided the electrical equipment). A spectator hoping for a good view, climbed on the roof of the public lavatories and fell through.

On 5th July 1930, the annual King’s Cup Air Race took place on this date, and planes had to follow a route of around 800 miles. Hull Aerodrome was a main control station on the route. Tickets were sold for 1s and 2s6d. The winner was Miss Winifred Brown in an Avro Avian III. (N.B. Hull Aerodrome is actually in Preston South.)

 

john wesley

July 3rd

On 3rd July 1267, Alice Falketon was given permission by the church authorities to build herself a house in St Nicholas Churchyard, so that she could live as an anchoress. Enquiries had been made as to whether she was a fit person, with enough funds to maintain herself, and if this would be convenient to the parish.

On 3rd July 1524, Peter Gornarr, tanner, of Bridlington, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of Robert Skelton of Bridlington, a tailor.

On 3rd July 1642, King Charles I set up his court in Beverley at the house of Lady Gee, North Bar Within, and quartered his forces (about 3,000 infantry and 1,000 cavalry) in and around Anlaby, Cottingham and Newland.

On 3rd July 1797, Hull Trinity House paid £2 10s to William Brand, James Hayes, Samuel Harrison and J. Peterson, whose ship the Argo had been captured.

On 3rd July 1850, Mr T. Firbank, Chairman of Hull Dock Company,  opened Victoria Dock, the first of Hull’s docks east of the River Hull.

On 3rd July 1892, a great flood at Langtoft reached a height of 7 ½ feet.

Beverley Minster

June 13th

On 13th June 1774, the Hedon Haven Commissioners held their first meeting to create a canal between Hedon and the Humber, so that goods could reach Hedon at all times of the tide. The 44 Commissioners (including 3 knights, 4 clerics, and merchants such as Samuel Standidge, Benjamin Blaydes and Henry Maister) had powers of compulsory purchase of land and to prosecute anyone who obstructed navigation. The canal was opened in December 1775.

On 13th June 1893, William Maclagan, Archbishop of York, visited Spurn in a small boat, saw the lifeboat station, school and lighthouse, and agreed to provide weekly religious services at Spurn. He then walked 31/2 miles to Kilnsea before continuing to Patrington by carriage.

On 13th June 1943, Withernsea Central School teacher Miss Longdon r.eported in the school log that incendiary bombs fell on the school, burnt out Classroom 8 and caused ‘holes in the hall and on the platform’. Some classes had to be accommodated in the Methodist Chapel.

Hedon Haven

June 5th

On 5th June 1618, ‘Blind Richie’ (Richard Graham of Millhill) had walked from the Scottish borders to seek help from Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, at Londesborough, and was given a pension of 10s a year. It is not known what his relationship was to the Earl, who had lands on the Scottish border.

On 5th June 1778, Beilby Thompson of Escrick created a deer park, and demolished most of the village houses, rebuilding them out of sight of the Hall, and recycling the bricks; he paid 5s to Mr Scott the millwright for demolishing the horse mill.

On 5th June 1854, Dr Playfair, from the Dept of Science, reported on the teaching at Hull Trinity House School that no geometry or algebra was taught; geography was badly taught; no empirical data given on laws regulating winds, currents and weather.

On 5th June 1915, German Lieut-Capt Boemack made the first Zeppelin air raid on Yorkshire, dropping bombs on Driffield and Hedon before aborting the mission. There were no casualties, although house windows were broken in Beckside, Driffield, and crops were damaged. Crowds of people flocked to Driffield the following day to view the damage.

 

beilby thompson

May 28th

On 28th May 1554, Beverley priest Robert Thwenge was brought before judges at York for the 4th time on the charge that he had been an ordained priest and had afterwards married. He had married after the Reformation, but before Queen Mary repealed the Act. He said that he would rather continue with his wife, and did not wish to be restored as a minister. The record does not show what happened to him after this. Most priests agreed to separate from their wives and retain their livings after doing penance for their sin.

On 28th May 1721, Ann Watson, widow, of Stoneferry, was buried in St Augustine’s Church, Hedon. She bequeathed her whole estate at Stoneferry to charitable uses. Memorial in the church to the Watson family, including her son Hedon Watson.

On 28th May 1787, Edmund Foster, carver and gilder start a sale of his stock in trade at the Golden Boy, Lowgate, Hull. The sale was expected to last 28 days (not including Sundays). The stock included chimney pieces, gilded looking glasses and ornaments. An early ‘everything must go/closing down’ sale?

On 28th May 1857, Charles Francis Annesley Voysey was born, son of Rev Charles Voysey. Designer in the Arts and Crafts style and architect, winner of RIBA Gold Medal 1940. (d 12.2.1941)

 

Ann Watson memorial