February 17th

On 17th February 1646, Christopher Hildyard of Winestead was fined £109 as a former Lieut – Col in the Royalist army (a ‘delinquent’) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament.

On 17th February 1803, Burnett’s Daily Shipping List recorded that no ships arrived or departed in Hull on that day (apart from the ferry to Barton).

On 17th February 1821, Robert Sharp junior, an unemployed bricklayer’s labourer from Hull, gave evidence in the hearing of a petition in the House of Commons. Colonel John Baillie, MP for Hedon, was accused of bribery and corruption in the 1820 election. Sharp claimed to have spent the 2 weeks prior to election day at the Charles Saunders Inn (now the Shakespeare), eating and drinking at the expense of the candidate and finally, on election day, receiving 2 guineas from James Iveson, Baillie’s agent, for making himself ‘generally useful’.  William Mason also gave evidence of being offered 12 guineas by James Iveson, political agent for Col John Baillie, if he would vote for him. Baillie’s election was confirmed.

On 17th February 1961, Angela Eagle, MP and Maria Eagle MP were born in Bridlington. The Labour MPs are the first set of twins to sit in the House of Commons.

Eagle MPs copy

 

 

February 3rd

On 3rd February 1727, John Marshall of Preston left in his will the income from land rents, to be used to buy 6 white loaves, given to the poor in Preston every Sunday. Marshall Avenue in the village is named for him.

On 3rd February 1832, James Acland was escorted by a crowd of many thousands of supporters (he said 20,000) on returning to Hull after being prosecuted for libel by Hull Corporation (he had accused them of corruption). The town won the case, but were awarded damages of a farthing. Acland, however, was unable to pay his legal costs.

On 3rd February 1854, Robert Bowser, treasurer Hull Zoological Gardens, and ship’s surgeon William Gedney introduced to Queen Victoria 3 Inuit people; they had come to Hull the previous year with Capt Bowlby. Tookoolito had learned English from whalers, and was later to have a long career as an interpreter. She, her husband Ipirvik and a boy Akulukjuk, returned to the Arctic after 2 years.

Tookoolito

January 20th

On 20th January 1577, John de Tradescant of Cottingham broke into the York house of John Paschal with 2 associates; they were convicted, hanged and their bodies given to the surgeons of the city to be dissected and anatomized.

On 20th January 1595, Robert Cripling and William Lucas, servants to Sir Francis Clifford, bet another Londesborough servant, George Ingmire, that they could beat him in a race on foot from Londesborough to Market Weighton; they won.

On 20th January 1652, John Rogers, Mayor, and Hull aldermen Edward Wingate, Durand Hotham, and Lance Roper, asked the Court of Chancery for help in compelling Mr Stiles and other former Masters and Brethren of Hull Charterhouse, to appear before them and produce documents to account for corruption in the management of the Charterhouse Hospital. (Things appear to have changed after this: a report in 1668 showed an increase in the number of poor cared for from 12 to 40.)

On 20th January 1782, Dr Robert Levett, or Levet, of Westella,  was buried in Bridewell church yard, London. He had died, aged 79, apparently of a heart attack. He had lived in Dr Samuel Johnson’s household for 20 years. Earned a living as a servant, waiter and physician to the poor. Johnson wrote a poem ‘On the Death of Dr Robert Levet’. Tablet in Kirkella church. B 1703 Westella.

On 20th January 1968, Ross Cleveland of Hull set out from Hull for the last time for the North-West coast of Iceland.

St Andrews Dock memorial
Zebedee’s Yard

December 21st

wm constable

On 21st December 1633, the Duke of Cumberland’s staff bought supplies of oysters (600 at 6d per 100) for Christmas at Londesborough House on his behalf when he was in York on business.

On 21st December 1721, William Constable was born at Burton Constable. He inherited the Constable estate, and is chiefly remembered for restoration work on the Hall, and as an amateur scientist and collector of art and artefacts; his Cabinet of Curiosities may be the most complete in any stately home. He became grossly overweight, suffering from gout, probable hypochondria and addiction to medication containing opiates. (d 18.5.1791) see photo with his sister Winifred

On 21st December 1824, Richard Arthur Worsop of Howden Hall recorded in his diary that he supported a charity which had been continued by the owners of the Hall since the 17th Century; he gave 6d each to 40 poor people of the parish, and a bushel each of wheat and coals to a further 10. He recorded several other charitable gifts in his diary, including a sheep to the workhouse.

On 21st December 1838, Hull banker Joseph Robinson Pease established, and was elected President of, Hull Labourers’ Friendly Society, having established a society in Hessle which had built a cottage there.  There were already dozens of friendly societies in Hull by this time, and this new group may have been more of a building society than a self help group. Pease was certainly no democrat (he described democracy as a ‘pestilent curse’).

On 21st December 1857, Henry Smith Bright, manager, Hull Cotton and Flax Mills, was found guilty at York Assizes of forging deeds of transfers of shares, and sentenced to 6 months’ penal servitude. His actions appear to have precipitated the closure of the Hull Flax and Cotton Mills and the bankruptcy of the partners in the Harrison Watson & Co bank on 24.9.1857.

On 21st December 1957, Edward Benn, 43, bosun, of Hull Rd, Hedon, died as result of accident aboard Hull trawler Cape Palliser off Iceland.

November 17th

On 17th November 1407, Sir John Constable died at Halsham, and indicated in his will a wish to make amends to anyone he had swindled, and to return to their families goods and chattels belonging to his villeins, which he had kept after their death, ‘for the convenience of their sons’.

On 17th November 1868, novelist Anthony Trollope stood as a Liberal candidate and came 4thout of 4 candidates in the election; he referred to Beverley (where ‘political cleanliness was odious to the citizens’) as Percycross in his 1871 novel ‘Ralph the Heir’.

On 17th November 1907, Bokane, Kuarke, Mongonga, Mafutiminga, Matuka and Amuriape, pygmies from the Ituri Forest, Congo River Basin, sailed home from Hull after 30 months in England. 3,000 people paid to see them at Olympia and halls around the country. They also visited the House of Commons. They stayed with Colonel James Harrison at Brandesburton Hall and hunted in the parkland. Human rights activists had campaigned to stop the visit.

Brandesburton pygmies

September 20th

On 20th September 1188, St John’s church at Beverley and most of the town were damaged by fire. St John’s remains were not found until 1197.

On 20th September 1535, John Colynson and Thomas Savage, yeomen of Holme on Spalding Moor were declared outlaws after spending more than a year in sanctuary in Ripon. They sought sanctuary in 1534, confessing to stealing a horse. Savage confessed to the murder of Amery Burdett, but Colynson did not confess, though a coroner’s jury found them both responsible, and indicted others as accessories.

On 20th September 1769, Felice de Giardini, famous violinist, played at the start of a 3-day festival to celebrate the installation of the new organ at Beverley Minster, the first festival of its type in the north of England. New music by Handel was performed, including the recently completed Messiah; tickets were 2s6d and 5s.

On 20th September 1779, Mr Foster, Bridlington quay master, reported that John Paul Jones’ American squadron of ships had attacked a large fleet of colliers and ran them into the harbour.

On 20th September 1813, Thomas Nutbrown was born in Eastrington.  Probably the same person who, aged 14 in 1828, applied to the Howden poor relief officers for some new clothes, and was granted a second hand coat. He died aged 72 in Leeds Township, Quebec, Canada, on 25 Sept 1885.

On 20th September 1883, Rev Edward Cragg Haynes died aged 62 in Swinefleet, after serving there for 32 years. Born in Barbados, classed as ’free coloured’, had links to the Clapham Sect. Set up a Grammar School in Swinefleet attended among others by Joseph Rank. (christened 3.6.1821)

On 20th September 1902, Stevie Smith was born Florence Margaret Smith in Hull. Poet and novelist, most famous for ‘Not waving but drowning’. D 7.3.1971 see photo

On 20th September 1903, Annie Marshall, 16, domestic servant, from Lissett, was raped, shot twice, suffocated with grass and thrown in the river at Scampston by Charles William Ashton, 19, of Cottingham, farmhand.  Ashton knew her well. He was found guilty of murder and hanged at Hull Prison on 11thDecember the same year.

On 20th September 1954, the Selby to Driffield rail line was closed for regular passenger traffic, a service of one regular non stop train each way plus occasional summer excursions ran until June 1965. The line was abandoned after the last freight train ran later that year.

On 20th September 1955, Robert Greenwood Tarran, of the Wolds, Beverley High Road, Hull, died aged 63. Civil engineering contractor, and founder of Tarran Industries Ltd, former Sheriff of Hull, and chief Air Raid Warden during WW2. He moved the Wilberforce monument, at his own expense, and was responsible for building 20,000 prefabs after the war. He was also suspected of complicity in profiting from deals over council land in Endike Lane, in a law case during which his colleague Digby Willoughby committed suicide.

StevieSmith

August 17th

On 17th August 1377, King Richard II issued a charter allowing the town of Hull to ensure the town walls and moats were kept in good repair, and to compel every householder to contribute to the cost of repair.

On 17th August 1427, Thomas Brygman, vicar of Foston, asked the Pope to relax the penances paid by those who did not visit church on holy days or give alms, because the church buildings were ruinous, and lacking a bell tower to call parishioners to prayer, and because the parishioners were too poor to repair the church. Their poverty was caused by ‘divers burdens’ imposed by King Henry to fight wars, and also because of the high mortality level in the area.

On 17th August 1863, Dr T.T. Pierson of Bridlington Quay apologised for signing a certificate at The Retreat asylum, Kilham, to declare a woman insane (whom he had known since they were at school) at the request of her husband; she turned out to be suffering only from the effects of alcohol.

On 17th August 1905, Hull merchant Frederick Harker was fined £2 plus costs for speeding at Harpham – travelling at 28 miles per hour in a 20mph zone. It was reported that the method used, of 3 police officers timing him over a measured distance, had not been used before.

On 17th August 1920, Sir Luke White, MP, died at Driffield, aged 75. Liberal MP for Buckrose since 1900, he died a pauper and under investigation for bankruptcy, having covered his political expenses by using money entrusted to him by the clients of his business as a solicitor.

On 17th August 1954, workers at King George Dock, Hull, began a strike against unsafe working conditions called the ‘Filling Strike’; within hours, 4,000 dockers were on strike and 60 ships lay idle. The strike ended after 11 days.

 

1954 dock strike