September 16th

On 16th September 1643, an artilleryman with a lighted match blew up the magazine at Hull North blockhouse and killed himself and 4 others.

On 16th September 1698, Robert Prudom established, and was the first pastor of, the first Baptist chapel in East Yorkshire. The building in Applegarth Lane, Bridlington is only 12 feet square. see photo

On 16th September 1829, Dr John Alderson, MD died aged 71, physician to Hull Infirmary from 1795. A polymath, he was one of the founders of the Hull Literary and Philosophical Society, and of the London Geological Society, wrote acclaimed works on fever and paralysis, established Sculcoates Refuge, (which eventually became De la Pole Hospital), and wrote on agriculture, geology, and supernatural apparitions. The funeral of this popular doctor attracted 12-15,000 mourners. He was buried in a family vault at St Mary’s Sculcoates. His statue can be seen on Anlaby Road. (b 1758 Lowestoft)

On 16th September 1846, George Hudson, MP and ‘railway king’ stayed overnight at Sutton on Hull, went to Bridlington Quay for breakfast, back to Hull, then travelled to Northampton. Joseph Robinson Pease marvelled that such a journey within 13 hours would have been unthinkable 20 years before.

Applegarth La chapel

August 26th

On 26th August 1310, King Edward II visited Beverley.

On 26th August 1346, Sir John de Sutton fought on the English side at the Battle of Crecy.

On 26th August 1800, Hull surgeon Edward Oxley advertised in the Hull Packet his invention Modena Fossil, as a speedy and effectual cure for ‘hooping-cough, palsy, rheumatism, asthmatic fits, … diseases of the breasts…’ The Medical Observer was very scathing of this product which it described as oil of amber.

On 26th August 1809, Hedon borough constable Edward Hoe received £1 8s wages for transporting Agnes Sharp and her son William to Friskney in Lincolnshire (her husband’s parish), as Hedon parish was not liable to pay her benefit. Her 9 year-old-daughter Rachel was entitled to settle in Hedon, and was left behind.

On 26th August 1824, on the traditional day of Swine Feast, the Feast mainly consisted of dancing and ‘riot’, most residents providing food for their friends on the Sunday before, leading to disorder which the magistrates could not control, reported author Thomas Thompson.

On 26th August 1833, Captain Richard Wallis Humphreys of the whaler Isabella in Baffin Bay picked up explorer Captain John Ross and 19 of the crew of his ship Victory. It had become stuck in ice and been thought lost for 4 years.  Humphreys was awarded a silver cup by the town of Hull at a dinner given at the Vittoria Hotel in January 1834. (The Isabella herself was trapped in ice and sank in 1835.)

 

John_Ross_rescued_by_Isabella,_1833

 

August 17th

On 17th August 1377, King Richard II issued a charter allowing the town of Hull to ensure the town walls and moats were kept in good repair, and to compel every householder to contribute to the cost of repair.

On 17th August 1427, Thomas Brygman, vicar of Foston, asked the Pope to relax the penances paid by those who did not visit church on holy days or give alms, because the church buildings were ruinous, and lacking a bell tower to call parishioners to prayer, and because the parishioners were too poor to repair the church. Their poverty was caused by ‘divers burdens’ imposed by King Henry to fight wars, and also because of the high mortality level in the area.

On 17th August 1863, Dr T.T. Pierson of Bridlington Quay apologised for signing a certificate at The Retreat asylum, Kilham, to declare a woman insane (whom he had known since they were at school) at the request of her husband; she turned out to be suffering only from the effects of alcohol.

On 17th August 1905, Hull merchant Frederick Harker was fined £2 plus costs for speeding at Harpham – travelling at 28 miles per hour in a 20mph zone. It was reported that the method used, of 3 police officers timing him over a measured distance, had not been used before.

On 17th August 1920, Sir Luke White, MP, died at Driffield, aged 75. Liberal MP for Buckrose since 1900, he died a pauper and under investigation for bankruptcy, having covered his political expenses by using money entrusted to him by the clients of his business as a solicitor.

On 17th August 1954, workers at King George Dock, Hull, began a strike against unsafe working conditions called the ‘Filling Strike’; within hours, 4,000 dockers were on strike and 60 ships lay idle. The strike ended after 11 days.

 

1954 dock strike

July 25th

On 25th July each year a traditional football match was held on St James Day, between Sutton and Wawne, starting at Foredyke bridge, boundary between the 2 villages, each village trying to get the ball home. Not known dates played or when abandoned.

On 25th July 1328, King Edward III is said to have closed down the Warter annual fair on St James Feast Day because of the number of murders that had been committed at the fair. There is a record that in 1300 certain manslaughters had been committed in the village by the canons’ men from Warter Priory. In 1328, King Edward III issued an order that it was an offence to go armed into any fair or market. Probably not aimed specifically at Warter.

On 25th July 1768, Joseph Hall was hanged at York Castle for coining at Hull. photo shows  medieval coins being made.

On 25th July 1873, William Dunwell, former Hull Trinity House School pupil, lost his life at sea by jumping overboard to save the life of a shipmate.

On 25th July 1911, Father Ottway, superintendant at the Yorkshire Catholic Reformatory at Market Weighton (actually in Holme on Spalding Moor) reported on rebellion from the boys, including threats to knife masters, which resulted in the attendance of 3 police officers and the thrashing of 6 or 7 boys.

coiner, Hanse Day

 

July 11th

On 11th July 1843, Archdeacon Wilberforce preached the last ever sermon in St Faith’s church, Leven, before it was demolished, leaving only the chancel, which was itself demolished in 1882.

On 11th July 1941, Special Constable George Brignall Marshall, aged 54, was killed in Hull by enemy action whilst on duty with East Riding of Yorkshire Constabulary during an air raid. Damage north of Paragon station and a major fire at Blundell Spence factory. 20 other people died, and 46 were seriously injured.

St Faith Leven

June 7th

On 7th June 1614, Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, of Londesborough House, paid for the apprenticeship of his scullery-maid Grace. He trained in London as a barber-surgeon for 7 years, and the Earl continued to support him when he had to transfer employers, as his first employer killed a man (perhaps in the course of treatment).

On 7th June 1672, the residents of Sister-Kirks (Owthorne and Withernsea) reported hearing the sound of the naval battle of Solebay, off the coast of Suffolk. A fleet of 75 Dutch ships surprised a fleet of 93 Anglo-French ships at anchor.

On 7th June 1796, Sir Henry Etherington laid the foundation stone of Hull Anti-Mill, to provide cheaper flour. An early co-operative, it was funded by subscription by poor residents finding the price of flour beyond their reach.

On 7th June 1837, the Union steam packet was in the Humber basin, Hull, Preparing to cross the Humber, when it exploded. 3 other ferries were next to it; 23 people died. The engineer was later charged, but not convicted.

On 7th June 1915, Vere Campey Marshall made a statement to police, stating that he witnessed a 1,000 strong crowd outside the premises of Kress and Wagner, 163/5 Spring Bank, throwing stones, and a girl using a hammer to break a window. Police and military were sent to guard the premises. Anti-German feeling was strong during WW1.

May 20th

On 20th May 1604, Jack Wright of Welwick, Thomas Percy, second cousin of the Duke of Northumberland, Robin Catesby, Tom Wintour and Guido (Guy) Fawkes met at the Duck and Drake Inn, Strand, London, and began the Gunpowder Plot, which eventually included 13 conspirators, including Jack’s younger brother Kit.

On 20th May 1816, Constable Thomas Pashby was fined 40s at the Tiger Inn, Beverley, for neglect of his duty as village constable in Ellerker, apparently for failing to bring defendants to court.

On 20th May 1910, Dora Whitehand, aged 2, drowned on a sofa when the house in Providence Place, Driffield, was flooded. A cloudburst in Cowlam sent a torrent of water down the valley, flooding hundreds of houses to a depth of 6 feet. 2” rain fell in Driffield in an hour. Bridges were damaged, and the furnaces at the gasworks were extinguished. Weaverthorpe was submerged in mud; Helperthorpe and Elmswell were also affected.

On 20th May 1917, Francis Acaster, carpenter, aged 65 of Francis Terrace, Hull, was killed by enemy action whilst a merchant seaman, returning to Hull from Bombay on board SS Tycho of Hull, off Beachy Head.

On 20th May 1941, Dr R.H. Moyes. Voluntary Medical Officer to Civil Defence was awarded the British Empire Medal for gallantry during an air raid.

SS Tycho