February 15th

On February 15th 1518, Richard Jakson of Hogett on the Wolds (presumably modern Huggate) claimed the sanctuary of St John’s church, Beverley, for debt.

On February 15th 1530, John Gillco, labourer of Painsthorpe, fled to his parish church in Kirby Underdale from York, where he had assaulted and killed John Notyngham at 4p.m. the previous day. A coroner’s inquest the same day reported that the killing took place within the liberty of the monastery of the Blessed Mary.

On February 15th 1793, a contemporary report said a horseman galloped into Hull with urgent news that men had landed near Patrington from a privateer. Nervous of the risk of French invasion, part of the Corps of Invalids stationed at the Citadel and several volunteer seamen were immediately dispatched to meet the enemy. A 2ndmessenger met them on the road near Hedon, and informed them that instead of French enemies, those who had landed were the crews of several colliers, who had left their ships to avoid the press gang. HM Sloop of War, The Queen, was lying at anchor in the Humber.

On February 15th 1898, James Ashton, 39, skipper, of Witty St, Hull, was lost with his crew when trawler European foundered in the North Sea.

press-gang

February 1st

On 1st February 1639, King Charles I issued an order to enclose Hull and improve its fortifications.

On 1st February 1714, a great wind caused damage in several places, and blew down Richard Stevenson’s house in Kilpin, then the fire in the hearth destroyed the remains.

On 1st February 1884, at the Hull Sanitary Congress, Hull City Hall, Rev Joseph Malet Lambert called for bold action to save hundreds of lives, and improve thousands more, by dealing with dreadful housing conditions, some of them a stone’s throw from the City Hall. The slums were cleared 20 years later.

On 1st February 1893, Hedon Gymnastic Society put on an ‘Assault-at-Arms’, with an appearance by a clown, and followed by a dance in the Board School room, Roos.

On 1st February 1922, Robert Anderson, 26 of 7 Emily Terrace, Gillett St was lost with 9 shipmates when Hull trawler Magneta was wrecked off Murmansk, under Russian arrest.

On 1st February 1983, 800 dignitaries, service representatives and families of the Norland crew gathered at the King George Dock Terminal Building, Hull. They were there to greet the return of North Sea Ferries Norland after over 9 months in the Falklands War supporting the troops. Unfortunately, 90 mph winds did not allow the ship to dock, and it rode out the storm in the Humber for several hours , by which time the banquet was over.  Hundreds of people were still there to greet them at the quayside in the evening. The Norland was refurbished and returned to the Rotterdam run on 20thApril.

Norland return

December 29th

On 29th December 1594, Sir Francis and Lady Clifford began a tradition in their new house  (Londesborough Hall) of Christmas and New Year feasts, entertaining 93 staff and local people, tenants from different villages on the estate on different days, to meals until 6thJanuary.

On 29th January 1611, they paid for entertainment from visiting puppeteers, 2 men and a woman, who called at the great house.

On 29th December 1817, Mary Woodall married John Lewis Friday, private in the 33rd (WR) Regiment of Foot, a  Waterloo veteran, who was probably born in Mozambique.

On 29th December 1829, Hedon MP Col John Baillie informed the Mayor of Hedon that the Post Office would have a daily post from Hedon instead of 4 days a week.

On 29th December 1881,  William Papper, 15, was murdered aboard fishing smack Rising Sun, in the North Sea, by Osmond Otto Brand, skipper of the boat, after prolonged mistreatment amounting to torture. Brand was found guilty of murder at Leeds Assizes and sentenced to death. Richard Rycroft was sentenced to 3 months’ hard labour for assault.

On 29th December 1898, Elsa (formerly Elfie) Gidlow was born in Hull. Lesbian poet known for On A Grey Thread 1923. Her family emigrated to Canada when she was 6 (d 8.6.1986)

 

December 21st

wm constable

On 21st December 1633, the Duke of Cumberland’s staff bought supplies of oysters (600 at 6d per 100) for Christmas at Londesborough House on his behalf when he was in York on business.

On 21st December 1721, William Constable was born at Burton Constable. He inherited the Constable estate, and is chiefly remembered for restoration work on the Hall, and as an amateur scientist and collector of art and artefacts; his Cabinet of Curiosities may be the most complete in any stately home. He became grossly overweight, suffering from gout, probable hypochondria and addiction to medication containing opiates. (d 18.5.1791) see photo with his sister Winifred

On 21st December 1824, Richard Arthur Worsop of Howden Hall recorded in his diary that he supported a charity which had been continued by the owners of the Hall since the 17th Century; he gave 6d each to 40 poor people of the parish, and a bushel each of wheat and coals to a further 10. He recorded several other charitable gifts in his diary, including a sheep to the workhouse.

On 21st December 1838, Hull banker Joseph Robinson Pease established, and was elected President of, Hull Labourers’ Friendly Society, having established a society in Hessle which had built a cottage there.  There were already dozens of friendly societies in Hull by this time, and this new group may have been more of a building society than a self help group. Pease was certainly no democrat (he described democracy as a ‘pestilent curse’).

On 21st December 1857, Henry Smith Bright, manager, Hull Cotton and Flax Mills, was found guilty at York Assizes of forging deeds of transfers of shares, and sentenced to 6 months’ penal servitude. His actions appear to have precipitated the closure of the Hull Flax and Cotton Mills and the bankruptcy of the partners in the Harrison Watson & Co bank on 24.9.1857.

On 21st December 1957, Edward Benn, 43, bosun, of Hull Rd, Hedon, died as result of accident aboard Hull trawler Cape Palliser off Iceland.

December 1st

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On 1st December 1644, Sir John Hotham and Captain John Hotham, his son, were tried for treason at the Guildhall, London; both were convicted and condemned to beheading.

On 1st December 1800, Agnes Sharp, aged 24, was interviewed by the Hedon Mayor and one of the Bailiffs to confirm that she was pregnant, that the child (or children) was likely to be born a bastard, in order to claim payment from the parish. The father was a soldier from Sussex whose unit had left Hedon. Eventually, she received 2s6d a week.

On 1st December 1832, Thomas King and William Duesberry stole 3 chickens from John Carter’s farm, Howden. They were arrested and sentenced at Beverley on 14 Oct 1833, Duesberry getting a prison sentence, but King, who had previous form and did not admit the offence, was transported for 7 years. He was given his freedom in 1846 and seems to have died in Hobart in 1859.

On 1st December 1950, The Port of Hull Society’s Sailor’s Orphan Homes changed its name to The Sailors’ Children’s Society and celebrated with a lunch at the Guildhall.  The Society began as a Christian mission to seamen, and began to house ‘orphans’ (children whose father had died) in the 1860s, opening the Newland Homes in the 1890s.

 

November 30th

On 30th November 1219, William de Forz II, count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness, was declared a rebel and excommunicated for offences against the Crown and the sheriffs of 6 counties were instructed not to give him any help; he had held onto castles after being ordered to restore them to their owners.

On 30th November 1280, the residents of Hedon petitioned government to fix their tax (fee farm) as they were ‘few and poor’ and competition from Ravenserod and Hull were increasing from day to day. The port was firmly in decline. Hedon ship motif can be found in St Augustine’s church.

Hedon ship, St Augustine's

On 30th November 1587, Alexander Crowe, Catholic priest, aged approx 34, was executed in York. Born in Howden, worked as a shoemaker and travelled to Douai; ordained at Rheims 1583. Captured at South Duffield while baptising the baby of Cecily Garnett.

On 30th November 1644, Sir John Hotham began his trial for treason at the Guildhall, London.

On 30th November 1832, Henry John Shepherd, attorney and JP, of Beverley, went bankrupt, having speculated in building projects; his creditors were reported to include mainly individuals who had given him money for investment with no security; the bankruptcy register describes him as ‘dealer and chapman’. Shepherd was again practising as a solicitor in 1833.

 

November 23rd

On 23rd November 1599, the Council in the North made an order that John Gregory should serve as Hull Sheriff, although he had held the office 32 years before in 1567, and had asked to be released. He appears to have been successful in spite of the order.

On 23rd November 1796, John Taylor jnr, member of the Hull Troop of Gentlemen and Yeomanry Cavalry, was unanimously expelled and voted to Coventry for improper conduct. The record does not state what he did. photo shows cavalry of the time.

On 23rd November 1863, at the Howden Martinmas hiring fair, 700 men and 800 women attended, the largest number of any ER town; fairs were also held in Beverley, Bridlington, Driffield, Hedon, Patrington, where farmers and people seeking employment gathered. The church was concerned about the moral issues involved when single women had to parade themselves in public. Traditionally, farmworkers had a week’s holiday, annual wages paid, and there were pleasure fairs.

cavalry1796

November 5th

On 5th November  1605, Sir Thomas Knyvet of Escrick, as Gentleman of the Bedchamber to King James I, he went to the House of Lords cellar to investigate a rumour and discovered Guy Fawkes and some gunpowder …

On 5th November 1740, Elizabeth Johnson’s charity distributed money to the 4 poorest families in Cherry Burton every year on this date.  Daughter of Dr Hodgson Johnson, she left £40 to be invested, adding to the 40s left by her father 16 years before.

On 5th November 1804, 7 of the 8 crew of the Cecilia Margaretha of the Duchy of Holstein died when the ship was driven ashore at Mappleton and wrecked on a trip from Liepaja, Russia, to Lisbon. photo shows Mappleton today

On 5th November 1854, James Elliott, private in the Coldstream Guards, died aged 22 at the Battle of Inkerman, Crimea; his memorial in Hedon church was ‘erected … to commemorate the event and to show that Hedon contributed its unit in defence of the liberties of Europe’.

mappleton.JPG

October 27th

On 27th October 1720, Ann Watson, nee Headon, of White House, Stoneferry, left her estate at Stoneferry for a hospital for widows or daughters of clergymen, old maids, and for a school. In Sutton she left 26s p.a. to distribute bread to the poor who attended divine service that day.  She left several other bequests in different parishes; Ann Watson Street is later named for her; she is buried in Hedon, and has memorials there and in St James Church, Sutton.

On 27th October 1849, Hull Trinity House purchased chalkstone to protect the Spurn lifeboat cottages from the sea, as high tides and gravel extraction had greatly damaged the Point.

On 27th October 1907, Charles Henry Wilson died aged 74 at Warter Priory. Son of the founder of the Wilson Line, he was MP for Hull, then Hull West, a JP, and High Sheriff of Hull. He paid for the Seaman’s Mission in Posterngate (now the Mission pub). Deputy Lieutenant of the East Riding, he became the 1stLord Nunburnholme in 1906. photo shows part of his memorial in Warter church.

Chas Wilson Nunburnholme

October 18th

On 18th October it was the tradition, on St Luke’s Day, to appoint an official dog-whipper to keep dogs out of church, and to whip any dogs found in the streets; the tradition is said to have begun when a dog ate a consecrated wafer in York Minster.

On 18th October 1654, The Petition of the Three Colonels or The Humble Petition of Several Colonels of the Army was published, authored by Alured, John Okey and Thos Saunders. Colonel Matthew Alured, brother of Hedon MP John Alured, lost his commission, and was imprisoned for a year for stirring up dissatisfaction with Parliament among English troops in Ireland.

On 18th October 1833, Capt John Ross was granted the Freedom of the Town of Hull. Having returned to Hull on expedition to find the lost Isabella, was then himself thought lost.  (He was also granted the freedoms of London, Liverpool, Bristol and Wicklow)

On 18th October 1850, the Hull Advertiser reported that the ring leaders of a riot which resulted in the deaths of 4 Irish labourers on Sunk Island in July were found guilty of riot and sentenced to 4 months each with hard labour.They were: Robert Smith, John Londsbro, George Bellamy, John Dent, George Bielby and Fewson Towse.

 

John_Ross_rescued_by_Isabella,_1833