April 27th

On 27th April 1314, King Edward II stayed in Beverley on his way to fight the Scots at Bannockburn.

On 27th April 1681, John Baker, pewterer, known as ‘the Protestant tinker’ and a chamberlain of Hull, was working for the Ordnance Office to look into the misappropriation of lead, timber and other materials for use in Hull North Blockhouse. He alleged that materials had been delivered to the houses of the Governor (Bellasis) and the Lieutenant-Governor (Gilby). The Privy Council ordered Hull council to prosecute Baker for spreading false news.

On 27th April 1759, Mary Wollstonecraft was born in Spitalfields, London. Feminist writer and mother of Mary Shelley, she lived in Beverley for 6 years, aged 9-15.

On 27th April 1821, the Spurn lifeboat crew were assaulted while loading gravel for the Lord of the Manor, Francis Sheldon Constable, by local men who wanted to share the income from this work.

On 27th April 1918, former Reckitt’s employee Private Richard Wilson, 42, died on active service with 942ndArea Employment Co Labour Corps. He is buried in Rouen, France.

Mary Wollstonecraft

March 6th

On 6th March 1851, two days of severe storms, coupled with high tides, caused several breaches in Spurn Point, and made the Low Light insecure. The lifeboat was damaged, and several of the crew’s cottages were flooded. The extraction of gravel was halted, but did not finally end for many years.

On 6th March 1862, Joseph Wildridge, aged 14, apprentice, was attacked by another apprentice, probably named William Webb, on board Hull fishing smack Fairy. He was  so severely injured that he had to be returned home by another vessel, and died on 9thApril. He was unable to report on the events leading up to his attack, and a court case failed to prove a case against his assailant, as the crew would not testify.

On 6th March 1883, a great storm affecting the whole of the East coast resulted in huge losses in the Hull fishing fleet. Accounts vary: up to 230 Hull fishermen and 32 fishing smacks are recorded as lost.

On 6th March 1916, Zeppelin L14, after attacking Hull, dropped bombs on Burstwick and Owstwick, with no further casualties, before passing out to sea.

On 6th March 1919, the RAF Squadron 248 at Hornsea Mere seaplane station disbanded. From August 1918, it flew coastal patrols with Short 184 and Fairey Hamble Baby floatplanes off the Yorkshire coast. photo shows a short 184

 

short-184

October 27th

On 27th October 1720, Ann Watson, nee Headon, of White House, Stoneferry, left her estate at Stoneferry for a hospital for widows or daughters of clergymen, old maids, and for a school. In Sutton she left 26s p.a. to distribute bread to the poor who attended divine service that day.  She left several other bequests in different parishes; Ann Watson Street is later named for her; she is buried in Hedon, and has memorials there and in St James Church, Sutton.

On 27th October 1849, Hull Trinity House purchased chalkstone to protect the Spurn lifeboat cottages from the sea, as high tides and gravel extraction had greatly damaged the Point.

On 27th October 1907, Charles Henry Wilson died aged 74 at Warter Priory. Son of the founder of the Wilson Line, he was MP for Hull, then Hull West, a JP, and High Sheriff of Hull. He paid for the Seaman’s Mission in Posterngate (now the Mission pub). Deputy Lieutenant of the East Riding, he became the 1stLord Nunburnholme in 1906. photo shows part of his memorial in Warter church.

Chas Wilson Nunburnholme