April 11th

On 11th April 1493, William Vasour of Newton, Wilberfoss, died in a field in Sutton-on-Derwent after being attacked by Henry Taillour with a dagger.  On 17thApril, Taillour arrived at the church of St John, Beverley, and claimed sanctuary for the crime.

On 11th April 1519, Robert Tailor, a weaver from Stamford Bridge, claimed the sanctuary of St John’s church, Beverley, for debt.

On 11th April 1803, Burnett’s Daily Shipping List reported that 3 vessels arrived in Hull, from Leith, Colchester, and Salou; 4 ships left, for Newcastle, Shields, Memel and Riga.

On 11th April 1941, Mrs Edith Robson died in Sutton House, Sutton-on-Hull. She bought a house as a free maternity home for poor mothers, ran it successfully, and donated it to Hull Corporation. Robson Way is named for her and her husband, Edwin; they donated land for a playing field in Church Street, Sutton, in memory of their daughter Barbara, who died aged 13 of meningitis in 1925.

On 11th April 1963, Karen Briggs was born in Holderness Road, Hull. She is one of Britain’s greatest judokas; she won 4 World Championships and 5 European championships. She was awarded an MBE, and an honorary doctorate from University of Hull 2013. Now Mrs Karen Inman.

karenbriggs2

 

April 10th

On 10th April 1694, John Roxby  & Thomas Spicer (Ferriby) and Peter Acy and Samuel Newton (Swanland) were chosen as parish Overseers for the Highways, (Ferriby and Swanland being in the same parish, but choosing separate officers). On the same date, Overseers of the Poor chosen were Paull Wollas and Wm Jefferson (Ferriby) and Robt Parker and Christopher Boynton (Swanland).

On 10th April 1733, Thomas Pelling, the “Flying Man’, set up a tightrope between Pocklington church steeple and the Star Inn, and fell to his death; he is buried in the churchyard.

On 10th April 1956, Paul Robeson, singer, actor and political activist, performed at Hull City Hall to an audience of 2,000. Publicity described him as ‘the world’s greatest negro actor, singer and film star’.

Paul Robeson

April 9th

On 9th April 1484, John de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln, became Heir Presumptive to the English throne, when the Prince of Wales (son of Richard III, his maternal uncle) died. The Earl died 3 years later, aged 25 at the Battle of Stoke, in a rebellion against Henry Tudor.

On 9th April 1610, the household accounts show that the number of servants in residence in the various houses of Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, (incl Londesborough House and Skipton Castle) rose from 49 to 83 after he inherited the Earldom. They included 4 musicians, and a huntsman.

On 9th April 1646, Matthew Topham, merchant of Hull, was fined £90 as a member of the Royalist army (delinquent) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament.

On 9th April 1814, Hull gunsmith Owen Probin, 38, was murdered by John Lever, a saddler, who had had a violent quarrel with Probin the previous day in Silver Street.

On 9th April 1858,  Sir Thomas Aston Clifford Constable and Rosina, Lady Constable, with a number of other ‘distinguished amateurs’ performed a programme of music at a charity concert  in The Music Hall, Jarratt Street, in aid of education for poor children in Hull.

On 9th April 1869, the Attorney General moved that a Royal Commission be set up to enquire into corrupt practices at the general election in Beverley the previous year. At least 800 people had been bribed, and corruption at Beverley was said to be ‘worse than at Norwich and Bridgewater put together’. The enquiry is said to have led directly to the 1872 Ballot Act.

On 9th April 1933, Canon Edward Arthur Berry, vicar of Drypool (grandfather of Mary Berry) was one of the speakers at a mass meeting in the Balmoral Room, Metropole Hall, West Street, Hull, called by the Jewish community to protest against Nazi actions against Jews in Germany.

 

 

April 7th

john-hotham-1-sized

On 7th April 1615, George Goodgion, senior servant to Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, ordered tenants to cart coals to the big house, which was out of fuel, and to note the names of those who refused. Tenants were required in their leases to do this work, but had to fit it in with their own farming work.

On 7th April 1643, Sir John Hotham wrote several letters to people on the Parliament side; the post for London was captured, and his letters published by the Royalists at Oxford, revealing his double-dealing.

On 7th April 1787, John Morrit, 34, was hanged at York for murdering John Argyle, aka Roundell, of Howden.

On 7th April 1810, Mr William Iveson, Steward to Francis Constable of Burton Constable, proposesd to Hull Trinity House to erect a lifeboat house on Spurn Point, provide 12 crew from Kilnsea, and open a tavern to create an income for the boat’s master.

On 7th April 1828, Joseph Robinson Pease, JP, made his first committal as JP in Cottingham, of a man who disobeyed an Order of Bastardy, i.e. he was jailed for refusing to pay maintenance for an illegitimate child.

On 7th April 1893, a rioting Hull mob destroyed 37 bags of carrots being taken on rullies to the docks, and used them as missiles to attack the police.

On 7th April 1943, pupils at Paull Primary School escaped unhurt when a barrage balloon escaped its mooring in the Humber, and exploded, setting fire to the school building.

 

April 6th

On 6th April 1486, John Heryson, husbandman of Middleton on the Wolds, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for killing Thomas Metcalfe of Melmerby with a staff earlier that day.

On 6th April 1713, Brigadier General Luke Lillingstone died aged 60 in North Ferriby. He had served in Ireland and Martinique. He is chiefly known for advertising Ferriby Grange for sale due to military debts.  His monument is in Ferriby church. see picture

On 6th April 1816, George Hudson, aged 15 or 16, was fined 12s6d for bastardy. It appears he then left his affluent home in Howsham under a cloud and moved to York. He eventually became known as the ‘Railway King’.

On 6th April 1911, Hull Corporation Transport introduced free passes for blind people.

Luke_Lillingston

April 4th

 

Pat church

On 4th April 1654, Emmot Laykes, wife of John Laykes, was fined in Patrington manor court for striking Gregory Bilton with a rolling-pin.

On 4th April 1868, Frederick Parker of Hemingbrough was executed at York Castle and his body buried within the prison for murdering Daniel Driscoll, 27, at South Duffield on 29.2.1868.

On 4th April 1942, Laura Jaselli, Italian alien, of Barrow Lane, Hessle, was given a Travel Permit registered with the East Riding Police (cert 379095) as an Alien on moving from Ashton under Lyme; she was allowed 17 ½ hours to complete the move.

April 3rd

On 3rd April 1674, Amos Cropper, 25, of Hull, was hanged at York for the murder of Joseph Beck of Dewsbury on the king’s highway near Huddersfield.  His body given to surgeons to be dissected.

On 3rd April 1835, W. Wilkinson died at Hull. The end of a boiler fell on him at the workshop of his employers Messrs Brownlow and Pearson. A plate was inserted on his headstone in Castle Street Cemetery by the engineers and fellow workmen as a testimony of their respect for his mechanical genius and moral worth.

On 3rd April 1941, Mr Stanley Cockerill, voluntary warden, was recommended for gallantry award for action in dealing with a fire bomb at Hull.

W. Wilkinson mechanical genius.JPG