March 25th

Warton's Hospital.JPG

 

On 25th March 1725, Sir John Warton died at 77 in Beverley. He was reputed to be the richest man in England, even though his father’s estates had been depleted by fines to Parliament for Royalism. He was elected MP for Hull, and twice MP for Beverley, but took little active interest in Parliament.  In his will, he left £4,000 for the repair of Beverley Minster, £1,000 to Warton’s Hospital, £500 to the charity school, £100 to the poor and £100 to each parish in Beverley. photo shows Warton’s Hospital

On 25th March 1780, Peter Horsfield, a negro servant to Mr Knowsley, curate of Boynton, married Elizabeth Lawson, daughter of the vicar of Weaverthorpe. It was fashionable at the time for rich families to employ black servants.

On 25th March 1868, Rev John Healey Bromby died at 97 at Hull Charterhouse; he was up to then the oldest working minister of the Church of England.

On 25th March 1904, a ‘Smoking Café and Lounge’ was opened in the basement of the Prudential Building, Victoria Square, a landmark Hull building. In 1941, the whole building was demolished by a German bomb.

On 25th March 1927, the Ministry of Agriculture closed the Crown Colony at Sunk Island, a failed experimental farm settlement for ex-servicemen set up during WW1. This is referred to in Winifred Holtby’s ‘South Riding’ as Cold Harbour colony.

Sunk

March 23rd

On 23rd March 1357, Robert de Thornton, vicar of Hessle and Holy Trinity, Hull, acquired a lane adjoining the vicarage and running from Holy Trinity churchyard to Lyle Street from the town council.

On 23rd March 1671, merchant William Bower died aged 74 at Bridlington Quay. He used his own money to build a school to educate the poor children of Bridlington Quay in the art of carding, knitting and spinning wool, and left £20 in his will for its maintenance.

 

March 20th

On 20th March 1735, London merchant Timothy Woolfe died aged 35, and was buried in Bridlington Priory church; he left the interest on £500 to the poor of Bridlington and area, not exceeding 5 miles distance.

On 20th March 1822, an earthquake at night shook beds, moved furniture and rang bells in Seaton Ross, Foggathorpe and Holme on Spalding Moor. It was also felt in Bielby, Everingham, Allerthorpe and Melbourne.

On 20th March 1905, Hull PC Thomas Nettleton died attempting to stop a runaway horse and van, which ran over him.

On 20th March 1947, Fred Stephenson, 36, rode the Kiplingcotes Derby course through 4-foot snowdrifts to ensure the continuation of the race since 1519. The clerk of the course, Harry Ruston, read the rules. It took 90 minutes to ride the course (it normally takes about 10 minutes).

On 20th March 1986, Deirdre Blakeston failed to win the Kiplingcotes Derby when she stopped to give assistance to Lorraine Bell, who was unconscious after her horse collapsed on the course. Horse and rider both recovered and Deirdre eventually finished the race.

Kiplingcotes

March 18th

On 18th March 1293, the name ‘Kingston upon Hull’  was first used by a jury called to value land in order to improve roads in the town which King Edward I had just purchased.

On 18th March 1708, the Hull Mayor and Chief Magistrates received a letter from the Council in the North instructing them to get all ‘dangerous or disaffected persons’ to sign an oath of allegiance to Queen Anne and to swear that Charles (Bonnie Prince Charlie) had no claim to the throne.

On 18th March 1859, John Sanderson was recruited to ‘work the Force Pump when necessary for the water closets’  at the Ladies Hospital, College St, Sutton-on-Hull. It seems the elderly residents found the pump too difficult to operate.

On 18th March 1924, Sir James Reckitt died in Hull aged 90. A businessman, JP, politician and philanthropist, he joined his father’s business, and created Garden Village as a model village for the company’s workers. Amongst his charitable works were contributions to Hull Royal Infirmary, Newland Homes for Seamen’s Children, the building of the city’s first public library, donated to the city, and the donation of Withernsea Convalescent Home to the Infirmary. He established the Sir James Reckitt Charity.  (b 15.11.1833)

jamesreckitt

March 1st

On 1st March 1384, Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, left in his will instructions to found the Charterhouse Hospital which his father had begun, and endowed it with land, nominating Sir Richard de Killing as the first Master, and left money to support 13 poor men and 13 poor women, feeble and old.

On 1st March 1838, the steam packet ferry services from Hull to Selby, Goole and Gainsbrough were restored, after severe frosts disrupted them from the 2ndweek in January.

On 1st March 1916,  a new Royal Flying Corps Squadron, the No 47 Home Defence Squadron, was formed at Beverley, on the racecourse site.

On 1st March 1921, Kenny Baker was born  in Withernsea. Musician and composer, considered the best British trumpeter, 3 times winner of best jazz trumpet player award, he played for Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis, the Beatles, and on TV and film soundtracks, including James Bond scores, The Muppet show, and ‘The Beiderbecke Trilogy’. (died 7.12.1999) see photo

On 1st March 1990, Sister Agnes Walsh was recognised by Yad Vashem as one of 27 British people known as Righteous Among the Nations for her part in protecting Jews during the Holocaust. Trapped in France when the country was occupied by the Nazis, she gave refuge to a local Jewish family in spite of being in grave danger herself as a foreigner. She was born Clare Walsh in Hull in 1896 (died 1993).

Kenny Baker

 

February 25th

On 25th February 1325, Nicholas le Couper conveyed property in Aldegate, abutting on ‘Wycote Dyk’, to Robert de Preston, draper.

On 25th February 1803, Burnett’s Daily Shipping List reported the arrival of 1 ship from Wells (Wells-next-the Sea, Norfolk?) and 14 ships left the port, for the Davis Straits, London, Lisbon, Rotterdam, Hamburg, Valencia, and Amsterdam.

On 25th February 1862, Miss Turner and Miss Broadley paid for the building work, and donated the land, for Turner Court, Midland Street, Hull. This is the only example of Model Dwellings built outside London by the Labourer’s Friend Society, (founded by Lord Shaftesbury) which became the Society for Improving the Conditions of the Labouring Classes. The first tenants of flat No 8 were James and Mary Ann Adam, 38, their 9 children and 1 grandchild.

On 25th February 1905, an International Commissionin Paris reported that the Russian Rozhestvensky did all he could to prevent Hull trawlers being fired on in the “Russian Outrage’ (also known as the Dogger Bank Incident’) which killed 3 Hull men. Russia voluntarily paid £66,000 to the fishermen.

On 25th February 1971, Rupert Alec-Smith, Lord Mayor of Hull, formally opened BBC Radio Humberside.

Russian Outrage

February 3rd

On 3rd February 1727, John Marshall of Preston left in his will the income from land rents, to be used to buy 6 white loaves, given to the poor in Preston every Sunday. Marshall Avenue in the village is named for him.

On 3rd February 1832, James Acland was escorted by a crowd of many thousands of supporters (he said 20,000) on returning to Hull after being prosecuted for libel by Hull Corporation (he had accused them of corruption). The town won the case, but were awarded damages of a farthing. Acland, however, was unable to pay his legal costs.

On 3rd February 1854, Robert Bowser, treasurer Hull Zoological Gardens, and ship’s surgeon William Gedney introduced to Queen Victoria 3 Inuit people; they had come to Hull the previous year with Capt Bowlby. Tookoolito had learned English from whalers, and was later to have a long career as an interpreter. She, her husband Ipirvik and a boy Akulukjuk, returned to the Arctic after 2 years.

Tookoolito

January 31st

Thos Ferres memorial

On 31st January 1631, Thomas Ferres died, aged 63. Mayor of Hull, Sheriff, and alderman, warden of Hull Trinity House. He left the Whitefriargate estate to Hull Trinity House, the rents to be used for the poor of the House. He also left bequests of over £1,000 to the poor. His memorial by local sculptor Earle is in Hull Minster.

On 31st January 1918, former Reckitt’s employee George William Trowell, 27, private with the East Yorkshire Regiment, win action on 23.4.17. No known grave. Was posted as missing, believed killed.  He was wounded in September 1916, discharged from hospital and returned to France.  He died in action on 23.4.17. He has no known grave.

 

January 27th

Pilgr Grace

On 27th January 1332, Sir John de Sutton was summoned to Parliament by writ and thereafter become Lord Sutton of Holderness.

On 27th January 1537, John Hallam and others captured during the attempt by the Pilgrimage of Grace to seize Hull were examined by local justices; Hallam and 2 others were condemned to death and the rest awaited the arrival of the Duke of Norfolk for a decision on their fate.

On 27th January 1599, the Earl of Pembroke’s Players arrived at Londesborough House for a week performing plays for the Shrovetide period, for payment of £15shillings.

On 27th January 1645,  14 Hull burgesses gave evidence that Thomas Swann was  not a Royalist, and should not have his property sequestered, but in fact was owed money by Parliament because his new house was demolished to build a defences for the town. His appeal failed.

On 27th January 1882, the Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII, joined the Holderness Hunt at Brantinghamthorpe, which recorded 1,400 horsemen, 4,000 on foot and 1,000 in carriages.

On 27th January 1901, Joseph Smith of Hull, on board SS Friary, was the 7thand last Hull passenger to have died of pneumonic plague contracted in the Mediterranean. He is commemorated in the columbarium at Hedon Road Cemetery.

On 27th January 1924, Brian Norman Roger Rix, Lord Rix of Whitehall in the City of Westminster and Hornsea in Yorkshire,  was born in Cottingham. He was a comic actor, specialising in Whitehall farce; awarded CBE for his charity work; campaigner for people with learning disability. He was also awarded 8 honorary degrees, 5 fellowships and many other awards, and was the first Chancellor of the University of East London, and vice Lord Lieutenant of Greater London. d20.8.2016

 

January 5th

On 5th January 1304, Sir John de Sutton was pardoned, because of his military service to King Edward II in Scotland, for taking hares in the King’s warren of Holderness.

On 5th January 1773, Mrs Bridget Briggs of Sproatley died and left money in her will to educate 10 poor boys and 10 poor girls in the village.

On 5th January 1824, the Port of Hull Society for the Religious Instruction of Seamen set up a nautical school for seamen and apprentices to receive practical and academic instruction, open several evenings a week. Many of the early students were illiterate.

On 5th January 1836, Captain James Clark Ross left Hull on an expedition to resupply 11 whaling vessels trapped in Arctic ice. About 600 men were in the overwintering ships.

On 5th January 1941, Amy Johnson, while flying for the Air Transport Auxiliary from Blackpool to RAF Kidlington, went off course in bad weather and bailed out as her aircraft crashed.  An attempt was made to rescue her, but she died and her body was never recovered. There is still, however, controversy surrounding the circumstances of her death in the Thames.

AmyJohnson death