December 1st

john-hotham-1-sized

 

On 1st December 1644, Sir John Hotham and Captain John Hotham, his son, were tried for treason at the Guildhall, London; both were convicted and condemned to beheading.

On 1st December 1800, Agnes Sharp, aged 24, was interviewed by the Hedon Mayor and one of the Bailiffs to confirm that she was pregnant, that the child (or children) was likely to be born a bastard, in order to claim payment from the parish. The father was a soldier from Sussex whose unit had left Hedon. Eventually, she received 2s6d a week.

On 1st December 1832, Thomas King and William Duesberry stole 3 chickens from John Carter’s farm, Howden. They were arrested and sentenced at Beverley on 14 Oct 1833, Duesberry getting a prison sentence, but King, who had previous form and did not admit the offence, was transported for 7 years. He was given his freedom in 1846 and seems to have died in Hobart in 1859.

On 1st December 1950, The Port of Hull Society’s Sailor’s Orphan Homes changed its name to The Sailors’ Children’s Society and celebrated with a lunch at the Guildhall.  The Society began as a Christian mission to seamen, and began to house ‘orphans’ (children whose father had died) in the 1860s, opening the Newland Homes in the 1890s.

 

November 30th

On 30th November 1219, William de Forz II, count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness, was declared a rebel and excommunicated for offences against the Crown and the sheriffs of 6 counties were instructed not to give him any help; he had held onto castles after being ordered to restore them to their owners.

On 30th November 1280, the residents of Hedon petitioned government to fix their tax (fee farm) as they were ‘few and poor’ and competition from Ravenserod and Hull were increasing from day to day. The port was firmly in decline. Hedon ship motif can be found in St Augustine’s church.

Hedon ship, St Augustine's

On 30th November 1587, Alexander Crowe, Catholic priest, aged approx 34, was executed in York. Born in Howden, worked as a shoemaker and travelled to Douai; ordained at Rheims 1583. Captured at South Duffield while baptising the baby of Cecily Garnett.

On 30th November 1644, Sir John Hotham began his trial for treason at the Guildhall, London.

On 30th November 1832, Henry John Shepherd, attorney and JP, of Beverley, went bankrupt, having speculated in building projects; his creditors were reported to include mainly individuals who had given him money for investment with no security; the bankruptcy register describes him as ‘dealer and chapman’. Shepherd was again practising as a solicitor in 1833.

 

November 29th

On 29th November 1486, John Thurleby started in a new post as Hull Collector of Customs, joining existing staff Thomas Annesley (collector) and John Wolleston (Controller).

On 29th November 1596, William Knight of South Duffield, and Henry Abbot of Howden were hanged, drawn and quartered as traitors for their Catholic faith. Knight was beatified on 22.11.1987,  Abbot 15.12.1929.

 

English Martyrs, hanged, drawn and quarted for the Catholic Faith in England

 

November 23rd

On 23rd November 1599, the Council in the North made an order that John Gregory should serve as Hull Sheriff, although he had held the office 32 years before in 1567, and had asked to be released. He appears to have been successful in spite of the order.

On 23rd November 1796, John Taylor jnr, member of the Hull Troop of Gentlemen and Yeomanry Cavalry, was unanimously expelled and voted to Coventry for improper conduct. The record does not state what he did. photo shows cavalry of the time.

On 23rd November 1863, at the Howden Martinmas hiring fair, 700 men and 800 women attended, the largest number of any ER town; fairs were also held in Beverley, Bridlington, Driffield, Hedon, Patrington, where farmers and people seeking employment gathered. The church was concerned about the moral issues involved when single women had to parade themselves in public. Traditionally, farmworkers had a week’s holiday, annual wages paid, and there were pleasure fairs.

cavalry1796

November 1st

On 1st November 1151, Adam, a monk from Fountains Abbey, is reported to have led a colony from the older abbey to found the new house of Meaux Abbey.

On 1st November 1831, the Scholfield and Clough Bank was the first bank in Howden declared bankrupt after 14 years. Partner Barnard Clarkson had to sell estates in Kirkham Abbey, Holme on Spalding Moor and Foggathorpe.

On 1st November 1834, Beverley youths lit a bonfire early, rolled lit tar barrels and threw fireballs into shops in Beverley marketplace.

On 1st November 1902, Major E.S.E. Harrison, aged 38, Adjutant, 11thHussars (of the Broadley Harrison family of Welton House) died from a fall during a polo match at Ghezireh, Egypt. He served with distinction in the Boer War (DSO) and bequeathed to the Regiment the Bhurtpoor Sword, now in the Royal Hussars Museum, Winchester.

Major ESE Harrison

October 11th

ON 11th October 1536, Marmaduke Thomson, vicar of Preston, rang the church bell and called parishioners to meet at Nuthill, where he swore in local men to join the Pilgrimage of Grace. Around 300 Holderness men left to assemble at Sutton Ings. (& see 10.10)

On 11th October 1643, 1500 Parliamentary troops left the besieged town of Hull and after 2 attempts and many hours’ fighting, drove the Royalists out of all their positions around the town.

On 11th October 1782, Rev George Lambert described Hull Fair as ‘A season for the amusement of children and the gratification of gluttony’.

On 11th October 1929, Mrs Edith Robson officially opened Hedon Road Maternity Hospital, the successor to the free maternity home for poor mothers, which she gave as a gift, fully equipped, to Hull Corporation in 1915.

 

fair 07

October 10th

On 10th October 1536, a large crowd of armed men from Holderness supporting the Pilgrimage of Grace met on Beverley Westwood and Sutton Ings and chose captains.

On 10th October 1596, the Howden churchwardens gave 8d to Oswald Metcalfe, a poor man, licensed by My Lord Grace and the Council (i.e. given licence to beg while on his way to his home parish).

On 10th October 1918, former Reckitt’s employee gunner George Henry Saul, 26, died of wounds while serving with the Royal Garrison Artillery. Buried Etaples, France.

Pilgr Grace

October 9th

On 9th October 1487, John Kape, husbandman of Kilham, confessed to killing Thomas Holme, labourer, with a dagger, and claimed sanctuary in the church of St John, Beverley.

On 9th October 1830, the whaler Abram was the first of the Hull fleet to return to port after a disastrous season in which 6 Hull ships were lost, and 15 from other ports.  Capt Edward Dannatt of the Progress reported the loss of his ship and the others. Most of those which returned in October and November had very poor catches.

On 9th October 1929, fire officers were called out to a fire at Howden Minster, thought to be arson. They had no access to a water supply, and had to use the moat in the Ashes Park. All 8 bells fell from the tower and had to be recast.

On 9th October 1953, Fred Elwell was made an honorary freeman of Beverley for his contribution to art. Several of his works are in Beverley Treasure House.

Fred Elwell

October 2nd

On 2nd October 1200, King John gave permission for an annual fair at Howden lasting a week; by the 19th Century it had become the biggest horse fair in England, but by 2007 Howden Fair had reduced to a 1-day event.

On 2nd October 1504, Thomas Henrison, husbandman of Skipsea, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 2nd October 1518, Thomas Weston, a ‘singingman’, from Snaith, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 2nd October 1541, the Privy Council of England sat in Hull.

On 2nd October 1658, Capt Robert Hildyard of Patrington left £10, half the interest of which was to be used to repair the bell frames, and the other half distributed to the poor for ever. photo shows his memorial in St Mary’s Lowgate, Hull.

On 2nd October 1738, Dick Turpin, alias John Palmer, was arrested for breach of the peace, shooting a gamecock in Brough and threatening to shoot a man. He was held in Beverley, where the JPs committed him to trial at York. It was believed that while living in East Yorkshire posing as a horse dealer, he took frequent trips to Lincolnshire to steal horses. He was hanged in York 7.4.1739. photo – Welton

On 2nd October 1883, Arthur Mallaby Illingworth, aged 7 months, died of scarlet fever. An epidemic had affected Hull since the previous year, killing over 600 people, mostly children under 5.  A brother born the following year, and named Arthur Mallaby Rawnsley Illingworth, died at 18 months, probably of the same cause.

 

September 11th

Howden

 

On 11th September 1666, Sir Philip Monckton replied to a petition from Howden residents to raise a company of musketeers to defend them, as the Great Fire of London had made them fear arson by a foreigner or Catholic; he suggested they double the watch and get the constables to watch the movements of every ‘Londoner’ at night.

On 11th 1795, Timothy Rymer, a sailor, was buried after drowning in the Humber, the body washing up at Blacktoft.