October 23rd

On 23rd October 1667, Richard Sterne, Archbishop of York, excommunicated a number of people, both male and female, at Beverley, and required them to make public penances, for crimes including adultery, fornication, and incest.

On 23rd October 1908, Wm Jackson & Son Ltd, Hull grocers & bakers, bought the company’s first motor vehicle (having previously used only horse-drawn transport and hand carts); by 1933 they had a fleet of 30 motor vehicles.

On 23rd October 1909, Rev Canon Joseph Malet Lambert, Hull philanthropist  and his wife Rose were charged at Dollgellau Magistrates Court, while at their holiday home in Barmouth, with cruelty against Mary Rose Inman, 11 years, whom they had adopted to save her from the workhouse and to train for domestic service. The girl had been starved (weighed 48lb) and beaten, and hidden from visitors. It appears that Mrs Lambert was convicted and sentenced. photo shows the school named after the Canon.

Malet_lambert

 

October 21st

On 21st October 1823, Mr Gleadow, commander of the customs cutter Bee, seized 31,324 barrels of contraband, including 250 lbs of tea, 720 lbs of tobacco, and 976 gallons of spirits, mostly gin, from the Lunatic asylum, Brandesburton Moor.

On 21st October 1904, the Gamecock trawler fleet from Hull was fired on by the Russian Baltic fleet, claiming they mistook them for the Japanese Navy. The trawler Crane was sunk and her captain and second mate killed; 30 others were injured. There is a memorial statue to the ‘Russian Outrage’ at the corner of Boulevard/Hessle Road.

On 21st October 1905, Ellen Borrill, of William’s Terrace, Hull, was murdered at Danthorpe by Peter Williams, her partner. He cut her throat in a field, walked to Burton Pidsea, and then gave himself up to the police at Roos. He claimed she had tried to kill herself, and asked him to finish her off. On 2nd December, Williams was sentenced to death, but was reprieved.

On 21st October 1921, Jim Graham and Cam Connor, out of work shipwrights from South Shields, bought a 14-seater Model T. Ford and set up Easington’s first bus service, just 2 years after East Yorkshire’s first bus service was set up in Elloughton by E.J. Lee, also using a 14-seater Model T.

Russian Outrage

 

August 15th

On 15th August 1690, Robert Lumley, ship’s master, was fined 10s by Hull Trinity House for sailing out of the port without supplying the House with a list of men and their wages.

On 15th August 1764, Abraham Clayton, 35, of Howden, was hanged at York Castle for murdering his wife Elizabeth; his body was given to surgeons ‘to be anatomized’.

On 15th August 1808, Robert Pattinson,  grazier and agriculturist, died aged 82, and left 4 acres of land in Skeffling, the rent to be used to educate poor children in Easington.

On 15th August 1924, Harry Blanshard Wood, VC, died aged 42 in Devon, after a traffic accident. Born in Newton-on-Derwent, he was a corporal in the 2ndBattalion, Scots Guards when on 13.10.1918 in St Python, France, he took command when his platoon sergeant was killed, and showed gallant conduct and initiative, for which he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

On the same day, BBC radio station 6KH began broadcasting local items from bishop Lane, Hull, including sport, talks, children’s shows, and music featuring local musicians, e.g. Powolny’s Restaurant Bijou Orchestra. In 1928, the station closed, and there was no local station until Radio Humberside opened in 1971.

On 15th August 1940, 13 military personnel and 1 civilian died, and 16 injured in this daytime air raid on Driffield airfield and Southburn, including Aircraftwoman M. Hudson, the first WRAF fatality.

August 6th

On 6th August 1778, the question of who owned Spurn Point was resolved in favour of the William Constable of Burton Constable; the legal dispute began in 1609.

On 6th August 1785, John Beck of Lelley was hanged at York Castle for setting fire to a house and corn mill belonging to William Jackson of Danthorpe, with Robert Crosby and John Edwards, also of Lelley; Edwards and Crosby escaped.

On 6th August 1859, John Riley, 36, of Hull, was hanged at York Castle for the murder of his wife, Alice.

On 6th August 1888, former Trinity House School pupil George Smith, age 15, drowned after a collision between the Barque Cambrian and a French Barque during a great storm in Valparaiso harbour.

On the same day, a Bank Holiday Monday, a popular trip out from Hull Corporation Pier was to Paull by boat to watch the Army’s Submarine Miners in training and holding boat races and athletic competitions. Several boats left the Pier during the day.

York Castle

 

July 27th

On 27th July 1643, Hull widow Ann Stevenson, whose husband died at Beverley in Parliament’s service as a cannoneer, petitioned the town of Hull to pay her the 35 shillings wages due to him; the committee agreed, in view of her poverty, to let her have 20s.

On 27th July 1782, Rev George Lambert of Fish Street, Hull reported in his diary on a violent thunderstorm in the evening, and lightning killed a cow very near their house, and scorched the hedges.

On 27th July 1796, jockey George Heron was thrown by his horse at Hull racecourse, Newington, and killed.

On 27th July 1855, James McLoughlin, aged 13, asked Hull Magistrates Court for the protection of the court on account of his mother having beaten him severely with a stick and a fire poker because he would not go out stealing for her.

On 27th July 1996, HMS Rose visited Hull’s Albert Dock; this was an exact replica of a frigate built in Hull by the Blaydes yard in 1757 and sunk in Savannah, Georgia in 1779. The only difference from the original ship was that the sails were made from recycled plastic bottles.

HMS Rose replica

May 30th

On 30th May 1778, Frank Slaiter returned to work at Escrick Hall 4 ½ months after breaking his thigh at work. His employer, Beilby Thompson, paid his medical fees, and gave him an allowance of 2/3 his normal wage while he was off sick.

On 30th May 1782, Rev George Lambert and Mr Towers began a journey to London with a ferry crossing of the Humber, which took 3 hours; it took from 11a.m. to the evening to reach Lincoln by coach. They arrived in London about 50 hours after leaving Hull. This was probably typical for the time.

On 30th May 1820, William Bradley died aged 33 of tuberculosis in  Market Weighton. Known as the Yorkshire Giant, he grew to 7’9”. Travelled with shows and fairs, and later charged visitors to his home. Was presented to King George III. (b 10.2.1787)

On 30th May 1859, a Hull Coroner’s Court jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against Isabella Hewson.  On 27.5 she had hanged her son, aged 2, and then gave herself up to police. No evidence of insanity was found on medical examination.

On 30th May 1912, Brigadier Mark Sykes inspected the Yorkshire Catholic Reformatory, Market Weighton, and found lack of discipline, bullying, filth, poor food, lack of fire precautions and drill, and poor medical treatment. Recommended all staff but one be dismissed. The management of the school was changed later that year.

 

Yorks reformatory