April 29th

St Mary's Beverley

On 29th April 1520, the tower of St Mary’s Beverley collapsed across the nave, killing many people in the church for the Sunday service. A piece of 16thC oak carved with an inscription to the event remains in the church. Sir Richard Rokeby and his wife Dame Joan gave £200 to rebuild the church.

On 29th April 1524, William Thowe of Hedon rented to the Mayor and town of Hull a patch of waste ground near St Mary’s church for a chaplain’s house; the annual rent was a red rose if demanded, i.e. the medieval equivalent of a peppercorn rent.

On 29th April 1757, the vicar of Hutton Cranswick recorded a very deep fall of snow.

On 29th April 1891, former Trinity House School pupil Herbert William Rea was shipwrecked on the Pacific coast of North America in 1880 on his first sea trip; he joined a schooner trading to the Pacific Islands, and was later appointed collector of taxes in Samoa.

 

April 28th

On 28th April 1489, Henry Percy, 4thEarl of Northumberland, was lynched at Cocklodge near Thirsk by a rioting mob protesting against high taxes, during the Yorkshire Rebellion. He was buried in a newly built chapel in Beverley Minster.

On 28th April 1825, a bull sperm whale washed up at Tunstall, and was dissected on the beach by Dr James Alderson, before being articulated by Edward Wallis, and put on display to the public at Burton Constable Hall. Herman Melville saw the whale and referred to it in his novel “Moby Dick’. The remains of the skeleton are still on show.

On 28th April 1876, Hull sculptor Thomas Earle died aged 66. A member of the Earle family of stonemasons and later shipbuilders, Thomas made a successful career in London. His works in Hull include the statue of Dr John Alderson (Hull Royal Infirmary), Oceanus (Trinity House), Queen Victoria (Pearson Park), Thomas Ferres (Hull Minster – see below) and Edward I (Guildhall). Awarded Royal Academy Gold Medal 1851.

Thos Ferres by Thos Earle

April 27th

On 27th April 1314, King Edward II stayed in Beverley on his way to fight the Scots at Bannockburn.

On 27th April 1681, John Baker, pewterer, known as ‘the Protestant tinker’ and a chamberlain of Hull, was working for the Ordnance Office to look into the misappropriation of lead, timber and other materials for use in Hull North Blockhouse. He alleged that materials had been delivered to the houses of the Governor (Bellasis) and the Lieutenant-Governor (Gilby). The Privy Council ordered Hull council to prosecute Baker for spreading false news.

On 27th April 1759, Mary Wollstonecraft was born in Spitalfields, London. Feminist writer and mother of Mary Shelley, she lived in Beverley for 6 years, aged 9-15.

On 27th April 1821, the Spurn lifeboat crew were assaulted while loading gravel for the Lord of the Manor, Francis Sheldon Constable, by local men who wanted to share the income from this work.

On 27th April 1918, former Reckitt’s employee Private Richard Wilson, 42, died on active service with 942ndArea Employment Co Labour Corps. He is buried in Rouen, France.

Mary Wollstonecraft

April 26th

 

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On 26th April 1642, the Hull Mayor received a letter from King Charles (now in York) demanding admittance to the town, and confirming Sir John Hotham as a traitor, and not to be obeyed.

On 26th April 1796, Capt Metcalfe, of Hull Trinity House, assisted in quelling the second day of riots in Hull. The price of bread was high, and starvation a reality, poor people spending 60-80% of their income on food. A crowd sacked a mill outside town, seized flour and meal, and took goods being landed from Lincolnshire. They attacked market traders and insisted on paying a lower price for goods.  The Riot Act was read; 2 people were jailed.

On 26th April 1828, Matthew Harrison, 40, of Beverley, was hanged at York Castle for horse stealing, with 2 associates.

On 26th April 1867, the Hull whaler Diana returned to port after 353 days away, mostly spent trapped in ice in Frobisher Bay in the Arctic. 10 (or 13) men died of scurvy and dysentery.  Captain  John Gravill is buried in Hull General Cemetery.

 

April 25th

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On 25th April 1524, The Guild of Minstrels met in St Mary’s Beverley, as they did on this date each year, and revealed the new pillar which the guild paid for, to repair the damage done to the church in 1520 when the tower fell. 5 minstrels are pictured on the pillar.

On 25th April 1524, Walter Shore, a cooper from Barmby Moor, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 25th April 1534, Sir Ralph Ellerker stodd for election as a Beverley governor, even though he was not eligible; he kidnapped and intimidated members of his opposition, was re-elected. The Archbishop of York ruled in the Star Chamber that the election was null and void.

On 25th April 1795, William Jackson, 25 of Keyingham, was hanged at York Castle for stealing 10 sheep.

On 25th April 1832, James Acland, of 23 Queen Street, Hull, printer and owner of Hull Portfolio, was elected churchwarden at Holy Trinity Church, Hull.  He campaigned against corruption in local government and headed the Hull Political Union.

On 25th April 1915, Father William Joseph Finn, 40, was the first padre of WW1 to be killed. At Gallipoli, Turkey, he ignored an order not to go ashore with the troops, and spent a long time offering help or consolation to the wounded and dying, before being killed himself. He was buried on V Beach. The Church of the Sacred Heart, Southcoates Lane, Hull, was built in 1926 and paid for in his honour by his brother, Frank Finn, Lord Mayor  of Hull. (b 27.12.1875)

Father Wm Finn 2

April 24th

 

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On 24th April 1597, the Council in the North asked Hull and York corporations to work together and take part ownership with Roger Ashe of a new ship being built at Grimsby. Both corporations objected, and the York Merchant Adventurers joined in, asking both sides to take over Ashe’s share in the ship, as he evidently wished to pull out of the project. How it was resolved the author does not know.

On 24th April 1642, King Charles I sent heralds with a message to Sir John Hotham, giving him a last chance to admit the King to the town. It was rejected.

On 24th April 1644, Parliamentary and Scottish troops took the town of Stamford Bridge from the Royalists.

On 24th April 1882, Hull Street Tramways Company broke a strike by drivers and conductors, by engaging staff to replace those on strike. The strike was for improved working conditions, and resulted in the formation of the Hull Tramway Men’s Union.

 

April 23rd

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On 23rd April 1642, Sir John Hotham refused to allow King Charles I and his forces to enter the town through Beverley Gate. Charles declared Sir John a traitor, and all who obeyed him guilty of high treason, and withdrew to Beverley.

On 23rd April 1860, widow Elizabeth Ann Parker, 25, died at 1 Darley’s Court, New George St, Hull, of injuries inflicted by Thomas Kirkwood, 30, soldier, a deserter from the 29thRegiment. He was charged with murder and tried at York Assizes on 21stJuly 1860, but does not appear to have been executed there.

On 23rd April 1941, Private, Acting Corporal Ernest Collinson, 2ndBattalion, West Yorkshire Regiment, of Burstwick, led an action leading to the surrender of 50 Italian troops in the Battle of Keren, Eritrea. He was awarded the Military Medal for leadership, courage and devotion to duty. This was the most decisive battle of WW2 in East Africa. Many East Yorkshire men were in the West Yorkshire Regiment. Ernie was my great uncle.

April 22nd

On 22nd April 1566, Walter Cave was assaulted in his own home in Hull by Ralph Ellerker, his brother James and servants, and Cave brought an action in the Star Chamber. The argument involved Walter Cave accusing Robert Dalton, his brother-in-law and servant of the Ellerkers, of illegally harbouring Catholic priests, and Cave’s refusal to allow Dalton into the house to speak to Dalton’s mother. Ralph Ellerker claimed he acted in defence of his brother, who was unarmed. The outcome of the case is not recorded.

On 22nd April 1642, James Duke of York, the King’s son, aged 9, and the King’s nephew, Prince Rupert of the Rhine, 23, arrived in Hull unannounced, with the country people arriving for market day. They were well looked after, and invited to dinner with Sir John Hotham the following day. portrait on left shows James aged 12

On 22nd April 1893, arson suspected when fires broke out in timber stocks on Hull docks, during a dock strike which saw rioting, police charges and military involvement. The fire covered an area of 8 acres; the Citadel Hotel was destroyed, and total damage was estimated at up to £1million. Kier Hardy asked Parliament why the military had been sent to assist the shipowners. The strike continued into May.

April 21st

On 21st April 1499, Hull barber Richard Colyn sought sanctuary in the church of St John, Beverley, and confessed to committing homicide, and to being to an accessory, as he was present at the death of a man called Scotton, killed at Hull on 18thApril.

On 21st April 1803, Burnett’s Daily Shipping List reported 2 ships arriving from London, and 5 ships leaving port, heading for London, Hastings, Koningsberg, Amsterdam and Yarmouth.

On 21st April 1884, William Goodin, aged 34, with other mill workers, tried to put out a fire at Barker’s mill, Wawne Road, Sutton, with buckets, but was badly burned, and the mill was destroyed.

On 21st April 1982, the North Sea ferry Norland, captained by Don Ellerby, left Hull for Portsmouth, on the way to the Falklands as part of the Task Force, with 60 volunteers from the regular crew; she carried 800 men of 2 Para to San Carlos. Hull trawlers Farnella, Cordella, Junella, Northella and Pict were also requisitioned by the Navy and used as mine-sweepers. Capt Ellerby was later awarded the CBE. photo shows the Norland in the Falklands.

Norland in Falklands

 

April 20th

On 20th April 1602, Robert Watkinson of Hemingbrough, aged 23, was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn, London, as a Catholic priest; he was arrested almost immediately on returning to England after ordination at Arras, France.

On 20th April 1803, a sloop was ‘burnt to the water’s edge’ in Hedon harbour.

On 20th April 1808, Thomas Wilbe, 31, of Hull, was hanged at York Castle for raping a girl under 10 years old.

On 20th April 1892, former pupil of Hull Trinity House School, and Chief Officer of the Elliot of Caernarvon, William Henry Ansell, 29, died of yellow fever at Santos.

On 20th April 1976, Rev Wm Whitehead, on the 190thanniversary of the first recorded measurement of distance from Mappleton church to the sea, recorded the distance to the cliff edge.  At 898 ft 10”, it was almost exactly 1,000 feet less than in 1786, an average of 5ft 3” p.a.  Film clip: https://www.bbc.co.uk/education/clips/z8jfb9q

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