December 26th

On 26th December 1220, William de Forz II, Count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness was with King Henry III at the Royal court at Oxford; the King made an appointment William hoped to get; disappointed, he left Oxford for Lincolnshire, and began a rebellion, known as the war of Bytham.

On 26th December 1489, George Gusterd, weaver of Bishop Burton, claimed sanctuary at Beverley for the murder of a servant of Edward Barnaby, a gentleman. He did not know the servant’s name.

On 26th December 1495, William Middleton was threatened with a pole-axe by John of Cottingham, John of Wawne, Thomas Warde, Robert Bate, and (- ) Mykill, and was so afraid for his life that he took sanctuary in Wawne church and stayed there for 10 hours, afterwards leaving the area. He applied to the Chancery Court for leave to prosecute his attackers, but the outcome is not recorded.

On 26th December 1645, Rev Nicholas Osgodby was reported to be using the forbidden Prayer Book in secret.

On 26th December 1750, the chapter house roof of Howden church collapsed, to join the rubble of the chancel which had collapsed in 1696.

On 26th December 1890, residents of Hornsea had a fair on the frozen surface of the Mere, and a sheep was roasted on the ice.

On 26th December 1955, Roy Francis played his last game after 6 years with Hull FC, and became UK’s first black professional sporting coach, and team manager 1971 to 1973.

roy-francis

December 17th

On 17th December 1216, William de Forz was given as a hostage with his mother Aveline to the new King Henry III when his father, William de Forz II, count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, supported the barons. Presumably this was to assure the king of his loyalty, as he had been a supporter of King John.

On 17th December 1965, North Sea Ferries began operating a ferry service from Hull to Rotterdam, for freight vehicles and private cars. MV Norwave’s maiden voyage saw a force 10 gale, which caused some trailers to break free of their shackles, but damage was minimal. The sister ship Norwind joined the service in March 1966.

Norwave

November 30th

On 30th November 1219, William de Forz II, count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness, was declared a rebel and excommunicated for offences against the Crown and the sheriffs of 6 counties were instructed not to give him any help; he had held onto castles after being ordered to restore them to their owners.

On 30th November 1280, the residents of Hedon petitioned government to fix their tax (fee farm) as they were ‘few and poor’ and competition from Ravenserod and Hull were increasing from day to day. The port was firmly in decline. Hedon ship motif can be found in St Augustine’s church.

Hedon ship, St Augustine's

On 30th November 1587, Alexander Crowe, Catholic priest, aged approx 34, was executed in York. Born in Howden, worked as a shoemaker and travelled to Douai; ordained at Rheims 1583. Captured at South Duffield while baptising the baby of Cecily Garnett.

On 30th November 1644, Sir John Hotham began his trial for treason at the Guildhall, London.

On 30th November 1832, Henry John Shepherd, attorney and JP, of Beverley, went bankrupt, having speculated in building projects; his creditors were reported to include mainly individuals who had given him money for investment with no security; the bankruptcy register describes him as ‘dealer and chapman’. Shepherd was again practising as a solicitor in 1833.

 

November 10th

On 10th November 1274, Aveline de Forz, aged 10, was married to Edmund Crouchback, 2nd son of Henry III.  Countess of Aumale and Lord of Holderness in her own right, and Countess of Lancaster by marriage.  She died childless at age 15 and is buried in Westminster Abbey. The Lordship of Holderness passed to the Crown. Born Burstwick 20.1.1259

On 10th November 1293, Countess Isabella de Forz, widow of William de Forz III died, having outlived her husband and all her children, including Aveline above. A legend relates that she came across a poor man carrying a basket containing what he said were puppies, but which turned out to be seven of his children that he was going to drown because he could not afford to keep them. After severely upbraiding him for his lack of morality, Isabella adopted the children and ensured that they were looked after and well educated until their adulthood when she found employment for all of them.

On 10th November 1518, Sir Marmaduke Constable of Flamborough (known as Little Sir Marmaduke). Died after swallowing a frog (some say toad) while drinking a glass of water. Knighted for military service including Flodden a letter of thanks from Henry VIII is displayed, in Wassand Hall. photo shows his tomb in Flambrough church. & see 9.9

On 10th November 1609, Sir George Wharton, who was raised at Londesborough, died in a duel in Islington with his good friend Sir James Stuart, the King’s godson, who also died. The event was commemorated by Sir Walter Scott in his ‘Minstrelsy of the Scottish borders’. (b1583)

On 10th November 1678, Capt Towes (or Towers or Towle) of the Hull ship Shield landed settlers at Burlington, New Jersey. Many were Quakers, who settled at Burlington, Salem and other places. One of the passengers was Mr Barnes, a merchant from Hull.

Little Sir Maramaduke Constable's tomb

August 22nd

On 22nd August, 1138, William le Gros, Earl of Albemarle and Lord of Holderness, was made Earl of York, in recognition of his prowess in the Battle of the Standard at Cowton Moor, Northallerton. The 4 standards of St John of Beverley, St Peter of York, St Cuthbert of Durham, and St Wilfred of Ripon, were used as a rallying point for the English against the Scots. The East Riding contingent included a Percy and a de Stuteville. (and see 20.8)

On 22nd August 1572, Thomas Percy, 7thEarl of Northumberland, was executed at York for treason, as leader of the Rising of the North. He was offered mercy if he renounced Catholicism, and refused.  Beatified by the Catholic church. (b 1528, probably in  Leconfield)

On 22nd August 1711, James Rand left £160 in his will for ‘the poor and needful of Preston’. Rands Estate in the village is named for him.

On 22nd August 1917, a bomb from a German Zeppelin destroyed the Primitive Methodist chapel, Baxtergate, Hedon.

On 22nd August 1918, Alfred Buchanan Cheetham of Bean Street, Hull, was killed when the SS Prunelle was torpedoed in the North Sea by a German U-boat. He took part in 3 Polar expeditions, and spent a total of 6 years in the Antarctic, with both Scott and Shackleton. Awarded the Silver Polar Medal clasp, he claimed to have crossed the Antarctic Circle 14 times. Cape Cheetham is named for him. (b 6.5.1867 Liverpool)

On 22nd August 1925, Robin Skelton died aged 72 in victoria, Canada. Poet, literary editor, professor and author of books on wicca. Born in Easington 12.10.1925

 

robin skelton

August20th

wm le grosOn 20th August 1179, William le Gros, Count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness, died aged 64 after 50 years as Count. As Earl of York, the most powerful man in the north of England during the Anarchy, a soldier, and founder of religious houses, including Meaux Abbey, and Newton Grange leper hospital.

On 20th August 1526, John Dove, a labourer from Burstwick, and William Bayne, a tallow chandler from Withernwick, separately arrived and claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt. On a busy day at the sanctuary, a 3rddebtor arrived from Wakefield.

On 20th August 1535, Richard Browne, vicar of North Cave, confessed to heresy by preaching Lutheranism; he was absolved, after suspension for 2 months.

 

May 23rd

On 23rd May 1260, William de Forz III, count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, died, aged about 45. He gave away his claim to the earldom of Chester in return for 2 small manors, including Driffield. Acted as ambassador for Henry III to Scotland and France, and was a member of the Council of Fifteen, advising the King on government matters. Gave land to Meaux Abbey on ‘the island called Ravenser Odd in the Humber’. His heir, Thomas, was 6 and he and the count’s lands were put into the King’s care.

On 23rd May 1510, Howden tiler Robert Colstayne claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for ‘the security of his body’; the register gives no detail of who was pursuing him, or why.

On 23rd May 1596, Howden churchwardens gave 6d to 2 poor men (presumably travelling through on their way to their home parish).

On 23rd May 1642, Hull Governor Sir John Hotham called a meeting of ‘knights and gentlemen’ to give a ‘learned speech’ explaining why he refused to allow King Charles into the town. This was part of the ‘paper war’ between the King and Parliament.

On 23rd May 1822, Hull merchant Joseph R. Pease attended a public meeting for the Relief of the Suffering Irish, due to famine in the West. He reported it thinly attended.

On 23rd May 1853, a Government enquiry into electoral corruption was opened at the Mansion House, Hull.  This followed a petition from the Conservative Party objecting to the election of James Clay and Viscount Goderich as MPs for Hull in the previous year. Hull was unrepresented in Parliament for almost 2 years; the Commission sat for 57 days and produced a report weighing over 11 tons and costing £5,000. (and see 16.8)

On 23rd May 1904, on Whit Monday, the Holderness Polo club held a polo match which attracted 6,000 spectators. This was held at the Polo Ground, Westbourne Avenue, Hull (modern Westbourne Ave West to Perth St West)The last matches were played in 1907.

On 23rd May 1907, the Mayoress of Hull opened a new military rifle range at Rolston, for use by Militia, Volunteers and Yeomanry. The land was leased from Rolston Hall.  below – Rolston Hall.

On 23rd May 1911, a fire began in the kitchen chimney of Sledmere House, which 24 hours later had destroyed the whole house. Fire engines from Driffield and Malton attended. There were no injuries.

 

 

Rolston Hall.jpg