February 10th

On 10th February 1644, Sir William Constable of Flamborough led Parliamentary troops from Hull in routing the Royalists at Kilham.

On 10th February 1801, Sir Samuel Standidge, aged 75, died at Thorngumbald. He was born at Bridlington, and at age 19 was taken prisoner by privateers and taken to Rhode Island. Later in life he traded goods to Rhode Island and bought lands in Holderness, building New York Farm, Preston, to mark his financial success in New York.  He is credited with restarting the Hull whaling industry, acting as master of his own whaler.  Sheriff of Hull, Mayor, and warden of Hull Trinity House 5 times. His memorial is  in St Mary’s Lowgate, Hull.

On 10th February 1866, 6 days after running aground on the Isle of Juist, Germany, 15 people were rescued from the rigging of the ‘Excelsior’ of Hull, where they survived without food and water. Mrs Newton was considered a hero for her support of her fellow survivors.

On 10th February 1871, at least 70 mariners lost their lives in Bridlington Bay in the Great Gale, including 6 lifeboatmen. 23 vessels were lost. There is a mass grave in the Bridlington Priory churchyard, and an annual Fishermen’s Service was held for 100 years.

On 10th February 1893, Revd Francis Orpen Morris died aged 82 at Nunburnholme. Vicar at Nafferton 1844-1854, rector of Nunburnholme to 1893. Irish-born naturalist and author of children’s books, and books on natural history and architecture. Anti-feminist, anti-hunting and opposed to Darwinism. (b25.3.1810)

On 10th February 1898, Commander Cave, of Humber guard ship Galatea, rescued the crew of SS Marbella in the River Humber, near Humber Dock, Hull. The Marbella had problems with its steering gear, and almost collided with 2 ships before hitting the Galatea. The only passenger had to swim to safety, and the Marbella’s cargo of 41 horses were all lost. The Galatea was itself later stranded on the Hebbles sandbank, but refloated later.

Saml Standidge memorial

January 13th

On 13th January 1096, King William Rufus found Count Odo, Lord of Holderness, guilty of a plot to kill the King and place his son Stephen (William I’s nephew) on the throne; Odo got off lightly with loss of his lands, and Stephen went on crusade. Holderness was granted to Arnulf, son of Earl Roger of Salisbury.

On 13th January 1621, Stephen Doughton left his job as servant of the Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, and received 2 years’ arrears of wages, a total of £5 6s8d. The family was short of cash, and servants were often not paid until they left the Earl’s employ.

On 13th January 1954, the crew of Flamborough lifeboat Friendly Forester saved the 3 crew of the fishing coble Silver Line.

On 13th January 1968, a liferaft belonging to the St Romanus of Hull was found.

St Andrews Dock memorial
Zebedee’s Yard

 

August 30th

 

 

Brid Priory churchOn 30th August 1510, Bridlington tanner Henry Braderig claimed sanctuary at the church of St Cuthbert, Durham, for killing Robert Lelome in the grounds of Bridlington Abbey. With 2 other tanners, Roland Hall and Robert Yong, he had struck Lelome with a dagger, and he died 2 weeks later. The attack happened 11 months earlier, in September.   photo shows Bridlington Abbey church today

On 30th August 1767, James Savage was born in Howden.  Journalist, printer and bookseller, librarian, antiquarian, and newspaper editor. Wrote ‘A History of Howden Church’ 1799 and a history of Wressle in 1805, and a number of other books. (Died  Taunton 19.3.1845). (Suggestion, unverified, that he was Howden town clerk, was accused of claiming excessive expenses, and left Howden 1801 with the parish records, refusing to return them until the town paid him monies due; the books were not recovered).

On 30th August 1854, Robert Wilberforce, rector of Burton Agnes and Archdeacon of the East Riding, resigned after leading a doctrinal controversy which raged in the Hull newspapers for many weeks. Shortly after this, he joined the Catholic church.  He died before he could be ordained. He was a son of William Wilberforce.

On 30th August 1913, Elizabeth Barr, 25, was shot at Watton by former partner and the father of her child, Henry Moore of Kelk, who then shot himself. A letter from Moore to his father indicates his action was premeditated. Barr died 2 days later, and Moore the following week. A coroner’s jury found Barr’s death was due to wilful murder.

On 30th August 1940, Abdo Nassa, age 50, fireman, died by enemy action whilst a merchant seaman in Atlantic convoy, on board SS Chelsea of Hull.

May 28th

On 28th May 1554, Beverley priest Robert Thwenge was brought before judges at York for the 4th time on the charge that he had been an ordained priest and had afterwards married. He had married after the Reformation, but before Queen Mary repealed the Act. He said that he would rather continue with his wife, and did not wish to be restored as a minister. The record does not show what happened to him after this. Most priests agreed to separate from their wives and retain their livings after doing penance for their sin.

On 28th May 1721, Ann Watson, widow, of Stoneferry, was buried in St Augustine’s Church, Hedon. She bequeathed her whole estate at Stoneferry to charitable uses. Memorial in the church to the Watson family, including her son Hedon Watson.

On 28th May 1787, Edmund Foster, carver and gilder start a sale of his stock in trade at the Golden Boy, Lowgate, Hull. The sale was expected to last 28 days (not including Sundays). The stock included chimney pieces, gilded looking glasses and ornaments. An early ‘everything must go/closing down’ sale?

On 28th May 1857, Charles Francis Annesley Voysey was born, son of Rev Charles Voysey. Designer in the Arts and Crafts style and architect, winner of RIBA Gold Medal 1940. (d 12.2.1941)

 

Ann Watson memorial

May 15th

FlambroughOn 15th May 1498, Robert Barker of Wistow, near Selby claimed sanctuary at Beverley’s  church of St John, for the murder of John Towree at Wistow on 9th May.

On 15th May 1591, priest Robert Thorpe, and Thomas Watkinson were executed at York – Thorpe being hanged, drawn and quartered for treason, and Watkinson hanged as a felon for harbouring priests. Both were arrested at Menthorpe on Palm Sunday, when neighbours saw palms being taken into Watkinson’s house, by the local magistrate John Gates.

On 15th May 1613, Lady Grissell Clifford, Countess of Cumberland, died, aged 54 at Londesborough. She appears to have been generous to the local poor, and almost the entire female populations of Londesborough and Shipton attended her funeral. Memorial in Londesbrough church.

On 15th May 1618, Phillip Constable of Wassand Hall was killed in a duel at White Cross, Leven, by Edmund (or Edward) Percy. Constable buried in Goxhill. Difficult to verify any details, except that Philip Constable died in 1618, and that duels were considered a foreign introduction at the time.

On 15th May 1896, a temporary dam created during building work for the Fish Dock extension, Hull, burst, and the sudden rush of water smashed and sank the fishing smack Young Greg.

On 15th May 1951, motor mechanic Edward Slaughter, of the Flambrough lifeboat crew, was awarded an RNLI bronze medal and Mrs Porter’s Award (given annually for the bravest deed of the year by a lifeboat man). A boy was badly injured falling 150 feet from the Flambrough cliffs, and E.S. swam to him, got him on to a stretcher and guided the stretcher to the cliff top.

May 1st On 1st May 1603, surgeon Simon Crouch was admitted as a burgess of Hull free, on condition that he treat the poor at his own cost. There was an outbreak of plague that summer, and Simon Crouch was known to be still in Hull in 1610. On 1st May 1676, Leonard Gaskill, 27, and Peter Rook, 25, of Beverley, were hanged for stealing 13 sheep from John Brown of Driffield. On 1st May 1810, Hull gunsmith William Taylor was indicted for passing counterfeit money to Cecily Rickatson at Sculcoates and given 6 months in the House of Correction. He later set up in business in Beverley, where one of his apprentices in 1821 was Esau Akrill (the Akrill family ran a gunshop in Beverley for many years). On 1st May 1826, Harriet Pease, wife of the banker Joseph Robinson Pease, of Hesslewood Hall, miscarried after horse riding. Medical help came from Hessle; Joseph’s diary gave his opinion that she might have died if they had had to wait for a doctor to travel the 5 miles from Hull. On 1st May 1877, William Pritchard, 21, apprentice of Porter St, Hull, drowned on board Hull trawler Iolanthe in the North Sea whilst boarding fish. On 1st May 1911, the Royal National Lifeboat Institution took over responsibility for the lifeboat station at Spurn, after 3 years of acrimonious argument.

Spurn

The Journey Begins

Hull and East Yorkshire History Calendar is a website under construction. When it is live, you will be able to view at least 1 event each day that took place at some point in the long and varied history of our area. Some days will have several entries. It may take a little while to load the data, so please bear with me, and in the meantime you can visit the Facebook page HEYHistoryCalendar.

 

Thanks for joining me!

Good company in a journey makes the way seem shorter. — Izaak Walton