Coming up this week – 18th to 24th June

Conflict is a theme this week – there are anniversaries of conflict amongst members of Hull Corporation; of the aftermath of the Peasants’ Revolt; of the Act of Supremacy; and of later religious persecution leading to mass emigration. Coming a little closer to living memory, Calendar entries reflect Hull women’s role in the suffrage movement and, in the 1920s, a race riot – this time against black seamen, who fought back.

We celebrate memorable local people: Ian Carmichael, Rev Joseph Coltman, William de la Pole, Winifred Holtby, Colin Verity, and a local saint (who appears never to have been canonised), St Philip Ingleberd. This week also sees the anniversary of what is perhaps this region’s most celebrated landmark: the Humber Bridge.

Read also about the Charterhouse, the Ferriby boats, flood, Hull heroes, plague, trouble with the Hothams, the Spurn lifeboat, the Truelove story, and selling a town’s silver.

As usual, the incidents occurred in a variety of places in the East Riding, including Beverley, Eastrington, Elloughton, Hutton Cranswick, Keyingham, Mappleton, Market Weighton, Orwithfleet, Sunderlandwick, Sunk Island, Sutton, Winestead.

Coming up this week – 11th to 17th June

It’s hard to find a common thread this week, so varied are the events recorded. The Blitz features again, as does death at sea. There are a couple of Hull firsts – the first Hull whaler to return from the Arctic on the 12th; and the first Hnefatafl tournament to be held in the city on the 17th. The whaling industry of course pre-dated distant fishing in Hull in the Arctic, and made Hull sailors in great demand for their knowledge of the difficult waters off Greenland and Iceland.

A Hull singing hero – Joe Longthorne – has an anniversary, as does an unsung (or at  least, forgotten) local author, Sarah Stickney Ellis. Sydney Smith is remembered in his home city, however.

The last fling of that dangerous family, the de la Poles, on 16th, who came very close, but never made it to the throne.

An incident of child neglect so extreme that it may be considered murder on 14th, even though the mother’s part is described as mere ‘misdemeanour’ – but the record is silent as to the motive. We can only conjecture.

A miracle, an anti-Catholic mob, charitable activities, and a last attempt to save Hedon as a trading port all feature this week.

Coming up this week – 11th to 17th June

It’s hard to find a common thread this week, so varied are the events recorded. The Blitz features again, as does death at sea. There are a couple of Hull firsts – the first Hull whaler to return from the Arctic on the 12th; and the first Hnefatafl tournament to be held in the city on the 17th. The whaling industry of course pre-dated distant fishing in Hull in the Arctic, and made Hull sailors in great demand for their knowledge of the difficult waters off Greenland and Iceland.

A Hull singing hero – Joe Longthorne – has an anniversary, as does an unsung (or at  least, forgotten) local author, Sarah Stickney Ellis. Sydney Smith is remembered in his home city, however.

The last fling of that dangerous family, the de la Poles, on 16th, who came very close, but never made it to the throne.

An incident of child neglect so extreme that it may be considered murder on 14th, even though the mother’s part is described as mere ‘misdemeanour’ – but the record is silent as to the motive. We can only conjecture.

A miracle, an anti-Catholic mob, charitable activities, and a last attempt to save Hedon as a trading port all feature this week.

photo shows Beverley racecourse – held in 1763 from 14th to 17th June

racecourse

Coming this week – 4th to 10th June

trinity house.JPG

A week of regular events and the unexpected, and the foundation in 1369 of a much-loved Hull institution, Hull Trinity House, and its physical embodiment in a much-loved building (see 4th June).

Zeppelin attacks in WW1 aroused much fear and also anti-German feeling. A violent murder at a village now lost to the sea, and another in a series of extreme weather events at Langtoft make rather depressing reading.

Radicalism took different forms in different times. In the 17th century,  John Shaw and George Fox were compelling speakers who proclaimed equality as religious doctrines, making enemies of those with power and influence; by the time of the Napoleonic wars, people’s concerns were more focussed on obtaining food at reasonable prices (Hull anti-mill was a response to the very real threat of starvation).

Other events included a reference to wife-selling, to the cultured life at Londesborough House, and unusual auditory effects at Withernsea.

4th

5th

6th

7th

8th

9th

10th

 

Coming this week – May 28th to June 3rd

Lots of different issues in this week’s events, including 3 items which illustrate changing attitudes to morality:

28thMay 1554 highlights the problems of priests in that period in the 16thCentury when England switched from Catholic to Protestant, to Catholic, and back to Protestant. Should a priest stay married and give up his post, or to retain his occupation and give up his wife? The repercussions of the Reformation were massive, and indeed still being felt in 1912 (see 30thMay 1912 entry) in the need to make separate provision for Catholics.

William Wilberforce (1stJune 1787) was concerned, well before the era of Victorian morality, to encourage virtue by punishing small transgressions. His aim seems honourable today (to reduce judicial deaths) – but his proposed solution (criminalising swearing) seems overly harsh to modern minds, I think.

On 3rdJune, we see an instance of charitable giving by a member of the Church enriching himself by corrupt practices. Hero or villain? You decide.

Several regular issues appear this week – lives lost at sea, crime, transport changes, and the impact of war (WW1, WW2, Boer War, Civil War, the Pilgrimage of Grace) on our area. There are mentions of local notables – the Wilsons of Tranby Croft, the Rev Barnes-Lawrence, Ann Watson, the Yorkshire Giant, Snowden Dunhill, the Hildyards. All famous for different reasons, of course,  and remind us that we are all individuals, and the past is full of fascinating characters.

Photo shows – a representation of Rev Barnes-Lawrence with a Bempton climmer.

Rev Barnes-Lawrence and a Bempton climmer - Version 2

Coming this week – 21st to 27th May

Heroes, transport, feud, mutiny

Driffield canal

The theme for the week is canals: anniversaries this week relate to the creation of Leven, Market Weighton, Driffield and Pocklington Canals. Improvements in the transport of goods enabled the Industrial Revolution. Raw materials could be taken to industrial centres more quickly, and the finished goods taken to market more easily. Improved transport also enabled the growth of cities, with a pool of workers for the new factories, by easing the movement of food from the countryside to the city. It was possible to live in a city area with no garden, but with shops. A double-edged sword – working people moved to the towns to earn more, but living conditions deteriorated, thus creating the need for local heroes such as Henry Cooper, commemorated this week, to stand up for the need for health and housing improvements.

Other heroes marked this week:

  • Amy Johnson landed in Darwin after a pioneering flight;
  • Sir John Hotham explained his reasons for preventing the King’s entry into Hull the month before;
  • Lilian Bilocca’s birthday, one of the Headscarf Revolutionaries working to improve the shocking safety record of the trawler industry;
  • Mick Ronson’s birthday, much missed musical hero.

An incident took place this week in the great 175-year feud between the Constable and Angell families over the ownership of  ‘a few scrubby acres and a rabbit warren’ that is Spurn Point. The Constable was Lord Dunbar, the murderer, who appears elsewhere in this Calendar.

A very mundane incident took place when the Navy bought a small ship, the Bethia, made at the Blaydes shipyard. They changed the name to the Bounty, and the rest, as they say, is history.

21st  22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th

Coming up this week – 14th to 21st May

This week is the anniversary of the start of the Gunpowder Plot, highlighting this area’s major role in an attempted Catholic resurgence. The tiny village of Welwick harboured at least 3 would-be killers of kings, and shows the rebellious past of Holderness.  Post-Reformation persecution of Catholics is also reflected in this week’s calendar entries.

Local heroes in war and at sea appear again, as well as the continuing toll of lives lost at sea, and the use of sanctuary at Beverley by murderers and other reprobates.

In May each year, it seems, both in world wars, air raids were particularly heavy.  Those made homeless were fed and cared for by the Municipal Kitchens in Hull, coping extraordinarily well with the worst raids of WW2.

Other events include a duel between a Percy and a Constable (2 of the area’s major gentry families), the problem of civic duties in the 17th century, a royal visit, and the death of Old Mother Riley.