December 11th

Meaux Abbey Farm

 

On 11th December 1538, Ellerton Gilbertine Priory was dissolved and the monks pensioned off. Sir John Aske of Aughton was granted the monastic lands, part of which became the parish church and graveyard. I have no record of the fate of the 13 poor elderly men whom the priory hospital was created to house.

On 11th December 1539, the Abbot and monks of Meaux Abbey were pensioned off when the monastery was dissolved. The abbot retired to Skerne, and some of monks took up posts as curates in Welwick, Keyingham and Beeford. photo shows farm near the site

On 11th December 1647, priest John Saltmarsh, MA, died. Author, theologian, rector, deacon and Chaplain in the Parliamentary Army during the Civil War. Argued for religious toleration and liberty of conscience. Told Cromwell and Fairfax that God was angry with them for their treatment of the Levellers, and resigned his post with the Army. (b Saltmarsh date?)

On 11th December 1915, former Reckitt’s employee Private Edgar Winson was killed in action, serving with 10thBtn West Yorkshire Regiment. Born Spurn. No known grave.

 

November 1st

On 1st November 1151, Adam, a monk from Fountains Abbey, is reported to have led a colony from the older abbey to found the new house of Meaux Abbey.

On 1st November 1831, the Scholfield and Clough Bank was the first bank in Howden declared bankrupt after 14 years. Partner Barnard Clarkson had to sell estates in Kirkham Abbey, Holme on Spalding Moor and Foggathorpe.

On 1st November 1834, Beverley youths lit a bonfire early, rolled lit tar barrels and threw fireballs into shops in Beverley marketplace.

On 1st November 1902, Major E.S.E. Harrison, aged 38, Adjutant, 11thHussars (of the Broadley Harrison family of Welton House) died from a fall during a polo match at Ghezireh, Egypt. He served with distinction in the Boer War (DSO) and bequeathed to the Regiment the Bhurtpoor Sword, now in the Royal Hussars Museum, Winchester.

Major ESE Harrison

August 24th

On 24th August 1399, a schism within the church led to controversy about the post of Meaux Abbot Thomas Burton, and rather than involve the abbey in the costs of litigation, he retired and wrote “The Meaux Chronicle’, the history of the abbey.

On 24th August 1662, on Black Bartholomew’s Day, also known as the Great Ejection, Josiah Holdsworth, curate of Sutton-on-Hull, was dismissed for refusing to conform to the Book of Common Prayer, along with 2,000 other Puritan ministers across the country.  They included Anthony Stephenson at Roos, who stayed in the village as physician, and Stephen Arlush of Howden, who continued to preach in a private house as a Congregationalist, also John Ryther of North Ferriby, who spent some years in prison for illegal preaching. And Mr Robinson at Cottingham, Mr Luddington at Sculcoates, Mr Thos Micklethwaite at Cherry Burton.

On 24th August 1759, William Wilberforce was born in High Street, Hull. The Parliamentary champion of the abolition of slavery, he collaborated for 50 years with Thomas Clarkson. MP for Yorkshire 1812-1825. Buried in Westminster Abbey. (d 29.71833)

On 24th August 1789, the Preston house and shop of William Sanderson were broken into by James Hartley of Manchester. Hartley was hanged at York Castle on 17.4.1790.

On 24th August 1921, an R38 airship exploded and crashed into the Humber on its last trial flight; 44 members of the crew died. Debris narrowly missed sightseers on Victoria Pier, Hull. photo shows wreckage

On 24th August 1943, Flight Officer Charles Keirl, 23, and 13 other airmen died when 2 Halifax bombers of 78 Squadron collided in fog; one air gunner survived. Keirl is buried in Queensgate Cemetery, Beverley. There is a memorial at Hull Bridge.

 

R38wreckage1

August20th

wm le grosOn 20th August 1179, William le Gros, Count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness, died aged 64 after 50 years as Count. As Earl of York, the most powerful man in the north of England during the Anarchy, a soldier, and founder of religious houses, including Meaux Abbey, and Newton Grange leper hospital.

On 20th August 1526, John Dove, a labourer from Burstwick, and William Bayne, a tallow chandler from Withernwick, separately arrived and claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt. On a busy day at the sanctuary, a 3rddebtor arrived from Wakefield.

On 20th August 1535, Richard Browne, vicar of North Cave, confessed to heresy by preaching Lutheranism; he was absolved, after suspension for 2 months.

 

August 12th

On 12th August 1349, the Meaux Abbot and 5 monks died of the Black Death; more were to die – only 10 of the 50 in the community survived. Afterwards, their serfs at Wawne went on strike, and the monks imprisoned them.

On 12th August 1536, North Ferriby Priory was dissolved (Prior and 8 monks, and 34 servants homeless and jobless); the first wave of Henry VIII closures followed an enquiry which found that the prior together with 2 of his canons had allegedly been guilty of fornication and 4 canons of abusing themselves.

On 12th August 1646, Robert Leedes of Molescroft swore an oath in support of Parliament. Having been a supporter of King Charles I, he was considered ‘delinquent’. As well as the oath, he was fined for lands and money worth £90.

On 12th August 1895,  Isaac Leggott, water bailiff, died instantly when a shell exploded at Alexandra Dock, Hull. It was thought to be an unexploded artillery shell, and Leggott had removed the fuse, prior to throwing it in the water. Henry Cook, dock gate man, was also seriously injured.

On 12th August 1987, Ismail Sowan, Hull College researcher, was arrested when police searched his flat in Westbourne Avenue in connection with the death of Palestinian cartoonist Naji al-Ali.  They found assault rifles, bomb-making equipment, explosive and grenades. Sowan, a Mossad agent, was arrested, imprisoned and deported.

 

naji al-ali

June 19th

On 19th June 1256, the Meaux Abbey chronicler reported losing men and oxen at Orwithfleet, south of Patrington. A major flood of the Humber reached as far north as Cottingham, with many lives lost, livestock and fisheries devastated, and land washed into the river.

On 19th June 1607, Thomas Wincop, Master of Hull Charterhouse, bought, with Hull Mayor George Almond and other trustees, land in Haltemprice Wood abutting on the common fields of Willerby, to support the running costs; the Charterhouse already owned substantial property in and around Hull. photo shows Wincop’s memorial in Hull Minster.

On 19th June 1837, Hull Steam Packet Company launched the paddle steamer Victoria at Medley’s shipyard, Hull; she was considered state of the art. A boiler explosion in 1838 killed 5 crew; there was a second explosion the same year; she ran onto rocks in 1852 and was wrecked, with 8 people killed.

On the same day, Rev Joseph Coltman died in Beverley at the age of 60. He was known for his support of local charities, of the emancipation of Catholics, and of the abolition of slavery. Born in Hull, Coltman Street was named for him, as was Beverley’s Coltman Avenue. At 37 stone 8lbs, he was reputed to be the heaviest man in England, and his death may have been caused by his weight. He employed a manservant to turn him in bed, but he fell asleep and Coltman suffocated in his sleep.

On 19th June 1887, to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Jubilee, a state service was held in Holy Trinity church, Hull, the new Market Hall was opened, as was East Park, and there were festivities in all the city’s wards.

On 19th June 1920, Harry Wilkinson of  Lower Union Street, Hull, was seriously injured by 3 gunshots.  He was part of a mob of white people who attacked and damaged several boarding houses where black seamen lived. Tom Toby, a West African fireman, was charged with wounding, but no white people were arrested. Toby’s plea of self defence was accepted, and he was found not guilty. During the same rioting, Murrell Piggott, faced with a 200-strong crowd, had also fired, but his plea of self defence was not accepted, and he was sentenced to 9 months’ hard labour for unlawful wounding.

On 19th June 1940, the East Hull, docks, suburbs, and River Hull corridor experienced the first night-time raid of World War 2.

 

Thomas Whincopp memorial

May 23rd

On 23rd May 1260, William de Forz III, count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, died, aged about 45. He gave away his claim to the earldom of Chester in return for 2 small manors, including Driffield. Acted as ambassador for Henry III to Scotland and France, and was a member of the Council of Fifteen, advising the King on government matters. Gave land to Meaux Abbey on ‘the island called Ravenser Odd in the Humber’. His heir, Thomas, was 6 and he and the count’s lands were put into the King’s care.

On 23rd May 1510, Howden tiler Robert Colstayne claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for ‘the security of his body’; the register gives no detail of who was pursuing him, or why.

On 23rd May 1596, Howden churchwardens gave 6d to 2 poor men (presumably travelling through on their way to their home parish).

On 23rd May 1642, Hull Governor Sir John Hotham called a meeting of ‘knights and gentlemen’ to give a ‘learned speech’ explaining why he refused to allow King Charles into the town. This was part of the ‘paper war’ between the King and Parliament.

On 23rd May 1822, Hull merchant Joseph R. Pease attended a public meeting for the Relief of the Suffering Irish, due to famine in the West. He reported it thinly attended.

On 23rd May 1853, a Government enquiry into electoral corruption was opened at the Mansion House, Hull.  This followed a petition from the Conservative Party objecting to the election of James Clay and Viscount Goderich as MPs for Hull in the previous year. Hull was unrepresented in Parliament for almost 2 years; the Commission sat for 57 days and produced a report weighing over 11 tons and costing £5,000. (and see 16.8)

On 23rd May 1904, on Whit Monday, the Holderness Polo club held a polo match which attracted 6,000 spectators. This was held at the Polo Ground, Westbourne Avenue, Hull (modern Westbourne Ave West to Perth St West)The last matches were played in 1907.

On 23rd May 1907, the Mayoress of Hull opened a new military rifle range at Rolston, for use by Militia, Volunteers and Yeomanry. The land was leased from Rolston Hall.  below – Rolston Hall.

On 23rd May 1911, a fire began in the kitchen chimney of Sledmere House, which 24 hours later had destroyed the whole house. Fire engines from Driffield and Malton attended. There were no injuries.

 

 

Rolston Hall.jpg