May 25th

On 25th May 1537, Dr James Cockerell, Prior of Guisborough, was hanged, drawn and quartered for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace; he was vicar of Hessle from 1509-1519.

On 25th May 1693, Robert Jackson, under-keeper of the lighthouse at Spurn, locked himself in the lighthouse and secured the door when told a party of armed employees of Lord Dunbar (Lord of Holderness) were on their way to claim ownership. They undermined the walls and took Jackson prisoner to York Castle.

On 25th May 1770, the Driffield Canal Commissioners fully opened the new Driffield Canal, which gave the merchants of this then small hamlet access to the River Hull and the sea. Between 1784 and 1799, 6 warehouses were built at River Head, and new factories and cargo vessels used the canal. photo shows the canal today

On 25th May 1815, Parliament passed an Act to create the Pocklington Canal. Most of the subscribers were titled and/or landed gentry, but among those who bought shares at £100 were innkeepers, a blacksmith, saddler, grocer, and 4 single women (spinsters or widows).

On 25th May 1826, Mr Brown made a balloon ascent from Mr Thompson’s yard, Beverley, which was described as ‘splendid’. Winds took the balloon south west where it crash landed on the moors between Thorne and Crowle, Mr Brown sustaining an injury to his spine. He was able to travel to Sheffield for another balloon trip.

Driffield Canal

4 thoughts on “May 25th”

      1. Sorry for earlier brusque response, Rebekka. I’m a beginner, and trying to get the hang of this, so I welcome feedback. If it’s still not sorted, please let me know. Text is: A week of regular events and the unexpected, and the foundation in 1369 of a much-loved Hull institution, Hull Trinity House, and its physical embodiment in a much-loved building (see 4th June).

        Zeppelin attacks in WW1 aroused much fear and also anti-German feeling. A violent murder at a village now lost to the sea, and another in a series of extreme weather events at Langtoft make rather depressing reading.

        Radicalism took different forms in different times. In the 17th century, John Shaw and George Fox were compelling speakers who proclaimed equality as religious doctrines, making enemies of those with power and influence; by the time of the Napoleonic wars, people’s concerns were more focussed on obtaining food at reasonable prices (Hull anti-mill was a response to the very real threat of starvation).

        Other events included a reference to wife-selling, to the cultured life at Londesborough House, and unusual auditory effects at Withernsea.

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