August 26th

On 26th August 1310, King Edward II visited Beverley.

On 26th August 1346, Sir John de Sutton fought on the English side at the Battle of Crecy.

On 26th August 1800, Hull surgeon Edward Oxley advertised in the Hull Packet his invention Modena Fossil, as a speedy and effectual cure for ‘hooping-cough, palsy, rheumatism, asthmatic fits, … diseases of the breasts…’ The Medical Observer was very scathing of this product which it described as oil of amber.

On 26th August 1809, Hedon borough constable Edward Hoe received £1 8s wages for transporting Agnes Sharp and her son William to Friskney in Lincolnshire (her husband’s parish), as Hedon parish was not liable to pay her benefit. Her 9 year-old-daughter Rachel was entitled to settle in Hedon, and was left behind.

On 26th August 1824, on the traditional day of Swine Feast, the Feast mainly consisted of dancing and ‘riot’, most residents providing food for their friends on the Sunday before, leading to disorder which the magistrates could not control, reported author Thomas Thompson.

On 26th August 1833, Captain Richard Wallis Humphreys of the whaler Isabella in Baffin Bay picked up explorer Captain John Ross and 19 of the crew of his ship Victory. It had become stuck in ice and been thought lost for 4 years.  Humphreys was awarded a silver cup by the town of Hull at a dinner given at the Vittoria Hotel in January 1834. (The Isabella herself was trapped in ice and sank in 1835.)

 

John_Ross_rescued_by_Isabella,_1833

 

July 16th

On 16th July 1796, 10 days after the introduction of the Dog Tax of 5s per dog per year, the Hull Advertiser reported a considerable number of rotting dog carcases, after owners killed their dogs and threw them in the street.

On 16th July 1802, Dorothy Wordsworth, sister of poet William, visited Beverley with friends, commenting on the beauty of the town and the minster.

On 16th July 1807, a Bastardy examination of Ann Linwood, single woman of Hedon
revealed that the father of her son, born on 28 Jun 1807 in Hull was gunsmith Owen Probin. Owen Probin was murdered 7 years later (the events are probably not related).

On 16th July 1885, Hull & Barnsley Railway and the Alexandra Dock officially opened.

On 16th July 1904, the Beverley Guardian reported a new phenomenon, ‘the hatless brigade’, when pedestriansof both sexes had been seen in Hornsea without any head covering whatsoever.minster beverley.JPG

July 12th

On 12th July 1537, Robert Aske of Aughton was hanged in chains outside Cliffords Tower, York, after being convicted of treason in Westminster, as the leader of the Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 12th July 1641, Sir Thomas Glemham resigned his post as Governor of Hull, having only been appointed the previous year.

On 12th July 1714, Elizabeth Hodgson, a single woman of Hedon, was sentenced at Hedon Quarter Sessions to be stripped to the waist and whipped with birch or willows from the Town Hall to Harrison Lane and from there to the jail and to remain in jail at hard labour until ‘sufficient security’ was found for her good behaviour. Her crime was to give birth to her 4thillegitimate child. There is no record of any punishment for the father. An Act of 1792 forbade whipping females for any reason whatsoever.

On 12th July 1826, (in one of the driest summers on record) Hessle banker Joseph Robinson Pease recorded in his diary there was no grass for the cattle, who had to be given linseed cake. Ponds and water tanks dry.  Around this time, too, the pond at Fridaythorpe dried up, and villagers went on a Sunday to nearby Fimber to take water from one of their 2 ponds, resulting in a pitched battle, referred to as ‘the Second Battle of Waterloo’. photo shows the remaining village pond at Fimber.

fimber pond.JPG

June 26th

On 26th June 1793, Captain William Hammond died aged 65 in Kirk Ella. Hull sea captain, shipowner and merchant, supporter of abolition, Chairman of Hull Dock Company, Warden of Trinity House, and diplomat. (He and David Hartley MP met Benjamin Franklin and John Adams in Paris on a possible spying mission) Buried in Welton. (b 1727 York). Photo shows a door in the Maritime Museum, former Dock Offices.

On 26th June 1854, at an event to celebrate the opening of the Hull-Withernsea railway line, 500 guests travelled from Hull on the first ever train (which was 20 minutes late, due to late arrival of guests) and part of the lunch marquee collapsed; there were no injuries. Joseph Robinson Pease in his diary recorded heavy showers and high winds threatened to tear the marquee to pieces, but that it subsided and all passed off well.

On 26th June 1920, the National Federation of Women Workers called its Hull laundry worker members out on strike, as they were paid less than in other towns. Hull Trades Council supported the strike and organised a parade on 17 July. Strike breakers were reported being smuggled in to work in laundry baskets.

Hull Dock Co

June 14th

On 14th June 1505, Thomas Wryght, husbandman of Hull, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley; the register does not state for what offence he was being pursued.

On 14th June 1702, the congregation of Cottingham church raised 8s 1/4d in a collection for the repair of St Germain’s church at Selby.

On 14th June 1772, John Robinson, yeoman and Susannah Evans, spinster, both of Skipsea, left Susannah’s 3-year-old illegitimate daughter on a dungheap in Gransmoor to die. Robinson was fined, to remain in gaol until the fine was paid; Evans’ sentence appears to have been 2 weeks on bread and water in prison, the crime described in the court record as a ‘misdemeanour’. (Presumably, the child was severely ill, injured and/or disabled if she remained where she was put).

Beverley Minster