June 9th

On 9th June 1786, a servant of Rev George Lambert of Hull gave notice that she was leaving after living with the family for 15 years, to live with a sailor who had recently sold his wife to another man. Most people considered this equivalent to divorce, although it had no status in law.

On 9th June 1888, a water spout in Langtoft sucked up mud and stones, and removed the soil from gardens, leaving bare chalk, as it moved across the local valleys. When it was halted by a steep hill, it deposited debris to the depth of 7 feet.

On 9th June 1965, Leslie Anthony Wegg was born in Hedon Road Maternity Hospital, Hull, with a full caul. A fisherman’s son, it was kept as a precious possession, despite a £100 offer to buy it. (from Eric Gill’s book “Superstitions’)

 

June 6th

On 6th June 1597, Robert Hewitt and his 6 musicians played for the first time at Londesborough House for Sir Francis and Lady Grissell Clifford, and regularly performed there for a number of years. They played shawms (like an oboe), curtals (like a bassoon), sackbuts (an early trombone) and the virginal (an early spinet). At different times, pipers, harpers, drama companies and a jester were hired.

On 6th June 1651, George Fox, Quaker preacher, proclaimed his Quaker beliefs in reply to the sermon at Beverley Minster; the next day he went another church 2 miles away, then to Cranswick, staying with John Hotham (grandson of the late governor of Hull).

On 6th June 1757, the vicar of Hutton Cranswick recorded a fall of snow.

On 6th June 1812, Hull Botanic Gardens were opened; the Band of the Royal Denby Militia played at the opening ceremony (they were based at the fort, as the Napoleonic Wars were still in progress).

On 6th June 1915, Hull residents sheltered under stairs and tables when they received an hour’s warning of the first Zeppelin attack on Hull. There were 11 deaths. Hewetson’s saw mill was destroyed. (other sources says 26 dead, 60 injured)

 

George Fox

June 5th

On 5th June 1618, ‘Blind Richie’ (Richard Graham of Millhill) had walked from the Scottish borders to seek help from Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, at Londesborough, and was given a pension of 10s a year. It is not known what his relationship was to the Earl, who had lands on the Scottish border.

On 5th June 1778, Beilby Thompson of Escrick created a deer park, and demolished most of the village houses, rebuilding them out of sight of the Hall, and recycling the bricks; he paid 5s to Mr Scott the millwright for demolishing the horse mill.

On 5th June 1854, Dr Playfair, from the Dept of Science, reported on the teaching at Hull Trinity House School that no geometry or algebra was taught; geography was badly taught; no empirical data given on laws regulating winds, currents and weather.

On 5th June 1915, German Lieut-Capt Boemack made the first Zeppelin air raid on Yorkshire, dropping bombs on Driffield and Hedon before aborting the mission. There were no casualties, although house windows were broken in Beckside, Driffield, and crops were damaged. Crowds of people flocked to Driffield the following day to view the damage.

 

beilby thompson

May 20th

On 20th May 1604, Jack Wright of Welwick, Thomas Percy, second cousin of the Duke of Northumberland, Robin Catesby, Tom Wintour and Guido (Guy) Fawkes met at the Duck and Drake Inn, Strand, London, and began the Gunpowder Plot, which eventually included 13 conspirators, including Jack’s younger brother Kit.

On 20th May 1816, Constable Thomas Pashby was fined 40s at the Tiger Inn, Beverley, for neglect of his duty as village constable in Ellerker, apparently for failing to bring defendants to court.

On 20th May 1910, Dora Whitehand, aged 2, drowned on a sofa when the house in Providence Place, Driffield, was flooded. A cloudburst in Cowlam sent a torrent of water down the valley, flooding hundreds of houses to a depth of 6 feet. 2” rain fell in Driffield in an hour. Bridges were damaged, and the furnaces at the gasworks were extinguished. Weaverthorpe was submerged in mud; Helperthorpe and Elmswell were also affected.

On 20th May 1917, Francis Acaster, carpenter, aged 65 of Francis Terrace, Hull, was killed by enemy action whilst a merchant seaman, returning to Hull from Bombay on board SS Tycho of Hull, off Beachy Head.

On 20th May 1941, Dr R.H. Moyes. Voluntary Medical Officer to Civil Defence was awarded the British Empire Medal for gallantry during an air raid.

SS Tycho