August 3rd

On 3rd August 1349, John de Preston was elected Prior of North Ferriby on the death of John de Beverley, himself elected Prior just 10 days earlier on 24thJuly, when he succeeded the previous Prior Walter de Hessell on his death. This outbreak of the Black Death killed 35 out of 95 parish priests in East Yorkshire, and presumably a similar proportion of the general population.

On 3rd August 1523, Thomas Senexer, yeoman, of Holme on Spalding Moor, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt. photo shows the Frith Stool (sanctuary chair)

On 3rd August 1732, Robert Cook was killed when he fell from a wagon at one of the chalk pits in Hutton.

On 3rd August 1798, Press Gang seamen John Sykes and John Burnock or Burnick were killed when attempting to press the crew of the returning whaler Blenheim (& see 2.8). The fight was watched by crowds on the dockside. Capt Mitchinson was charged with murder (& see 31.3) The navy men were buried in Drypool Cemetery.

On 3rd August 1878, for 1d working people could attend a lecture on ‘The Yorkshire Wolds in Prehistory’ as part of Hull Literary and Philosophical Society’s new series of lectures to the working classes in the Exchange Building, aimed at keeping working people occupied during the new Saturday half holiday.

On 3rd August 1942, Mrs Frances Snowden, Lieut Stanley Lawrence and Charles Cross were killed when 4 bombs were dropped on Flemingate, Beverley, damaging Hodgson’s Tannery and destroying a house, a medical centre and a warden’s post. 15 people were injured, some of them machine-gunned by the German bomber.

minster - frith stool.JPG

August 2nd

On 2nd August 1806, Capt Welburn, James Simon, ship’s surgeon, and crew of Hull whaler Blenheim were returning from the Davis Straits when the ship was taken by 2 French frigates, L’Syrene and Le Revenge. The Blenheim was burnt, its crew landed at Pampoule near St Malo, and conveyed to Arras where they were imprisoned. They were later moved to other prisons, and only released in 1814, after years of privation and misery, when the allies entered Paris. Dr Simon was subsequently in practice in Aldborough, Holderness where he died in 1845.

On 2nd August 1860, Hedon Magdalen Fair was finally abolished; in the latter years the owner of the field had to persuade, or bribe, those who wished to attend the fair not to meet there. The event had included a market, music, games, sports, juggling, fire-eaters, and badger baiting.

On 2nd August 1913, Charles William Loten and Terence Charles Carroll, 18, died at Hornsea whilst trying to save a child from drowning. A memorial brass in Hornsea church was paid for by public subscription.

On 2nd August 1916, Joseph Bennett, 17,  died in Hull from bubonic plague. photo shows his memorial in the columbarium, Hedon Road.

plague victim.JPG

June 20th

Hull Corpn silver

 

On 20th June 1533, the Hull Mayor and town council sold to Sir Edmund Perkins the ornaments of the churches in the town, for £15. They also gave to Sir Frauncis Jobson, Treasurer of His Majesty’s jewellers, ’24oz of silver plate whereof 7oz were double gilt and the rest part gilt and plain white, handed over for His Majesty’s use’. photo shows some of today’s corporate treasures.

On 20th June 1579, Edward, son of Nicholas Symson of Thorpe, because of the outbreak of plague at Howden, had to be baptised at Eastrington rather than in the parish church.

On 20th June 1583, Hull agreed to 10s compensation to Richard Frere for the loss of hay and his cote during the time when plague was in the town.

On 20th June 1642, Maurice Corney, vicar of St Mary’s Hull and Capt William Thornton, comptroller of customs were discussed by Sir William Strickland, Mr Alured, Mr Peregrine Pelham and Mr John Hotham, as a danger to Parliament’s cause. Sir John Hotham ejected Corney from the town, and he left for York, despite being considered a hero for his work during the recent plague. Thornton was also turned out, and joined the King’s service.

On 20th June 1645, John Blenkarne, master of the Hull ship Anne Dorothy, was moored in Marstrand, Sweden. He accused crewmen Peacock and Dynnis of inciting mutiny when they came aboard drunk, threatened him, and after a night in custody refused to come aboard until threatened with imprisonment. When they returned to home port, the court of Trinity House fined them and jailed them for 24 hours.

On 20th June 1761, Beverley widow Elizabeth Courtney, of Walkergate, paid the bellman to go round the town announcing a reward of 3 guineas to anyone with information about bricks thrown through her windows the previous night.

On 20th June 1810, Hull Trinity House reported raising £300 in 9 weeks towards establishing a lifeboat at Spurn.

On 20th June 1895, an auction was held in 2 fields in Bransholme Lane, Sutton, of ‘The Sweep of the Scythe’ of 25 acres of ‘rich meadow’, and also the ‘Eatage of the Fog’ up to the end of the year. This appears to have been dialect for the sale of hay cut for fodder for cattle.