October 8th

On 8th October 1536, Beverley men mustered on Westwood Low Green in response to the Lincolnshire rebellion against the Act of Dissolution. Elizabeth Stapleton encouraged them, despite the reluctance of her husband, and her brother-in–law William Stapleton became the rebels’ captain.

On 8th October 1643, Capt Strickland led a failed Royalist attack on Hull’s Hessle Gate, and was shot dead. Many of the attackers were killed.

On 8th October 1708, William Robinson died in Hull. Former Sheriff of Hull, donor of a hospital to Trinity House, left bread for 12 widows to be given each year on Christmas Day. They were required to go to his grave in Holy Trinity churchyard to receive their dole.

On 8th October 1805, Beverley corporation ordered that all rogues and vagabonds found wandering in the town must be apprehended and conveyed to a magistrate. A board  showing this order can be seen in St Mary’s church loft.

On 8th October 1862, Hornsea businessman Joseph Armytage Wade turned the first sod with a silver trowel at a ceremony to mark the start of building the Hull to Hornsea Railway.

On 8th October 1874, George Wombwell visited Beverley on his way to Hull Fair; in Saturday Market he exhibited elephants, giraffes, a rhino, and big cats; other shows also stopped over in the town before going to Hull.

On 8th October 1929, Wm Jackson & Son Ltd opened their landmark store in Paragon Street, Hull, designed by Hull architects Gelder and Kitchen, with a cafeteria and restaurant on the first floor. After the war, when the fire-damaged property was repaired, a 3rd floor was added as a ballroom. This was to become one of the city’s most popular night-spots for many years.

On 8th October 1985, Clive Sullivan MBE died aged 42. 1st black captain of any British national sporting team. He played rugby league with both Hull and Hull Kingston Rovers during his career. Holds records for most tries in a career (250) and most tries in a match (7). Commemorated in Clive Sullivan Way and the Clive Sullivan Memorial Trophy.(b 9.4.1943 Cardiff)

 

Clive Sullivan

July 12th

On 12th July 1537, Robert Aske of Aughton was hanged in chains outside Cliffords Tower, York, after being convicted of treason in Westminster, as the leader of the Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 12th July 1641, Sir Thomas Glemham resigned his post as Governor of Hull, having only been appointed the previous year.

On 12th July 1714, Elizabeth Hodgson, a single woman of Hedon, was sentenced at Hedon Quarter Sessions to be stripped to the waist and whipped with birch or willows from the Town Hall to Harrison Lane and from there to the jail and to remain in jail at hard labour until ‘sufficient security’ was found for her good behaviour. Her crime was to give birth to her 4thillegitimate child. There is no record of any punishment for the father. An Act of 1792 forbade whipping females for any reason whatsoever.

On 12th July 1826, (in one of the driest summers on record) Hessle banker Joseph Robinson Pease recorded in his diary there was no grass for the cattle, who had to be given linseed cake. Ponds and water tanks dry.  Around this time, too, the pond at Fridaythorpe dried up, and villagers went on a Sunday to nearby Fimber to take water from one of their 2 ponds, resulting in a pitched battle, referred to as ‘the Second Battle of Waterloo’. photo shows the remaining village pond at Fimber.

fimber pond.JPG

July 6th

On 6th July 1381, William Haldene of Beverley had his brains literally knocked out by John Erghom and others, with a pole-axe, 2 battle-axes, 6 swords, 2 forks and other weapons, before his body was thrown into the beck in Walker Lane.

On 6th July 1382, Sir Michael de la Pole leased to John de Hedersee and John of Dimlington land in Myton which included arable land, pasture and at least 30 acres of meadow, with houses, sheepfolds, 600 sheep and 160 lambs. Myton was clearly very rural then.

On 6th July 1537, the body of Sir Robert Constable of Flamborough was displayed on Beverley Gate, Hull, after he was hanged for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace, despite having been pardoned the previous year.

On 6th July 1538, Hull agreed to give a place in the Charterhouse to the wife of a blind man named Ralph, as his carer during his lifetime, taking up a place normally reserved for a man.

On 6th July 1642, Robert & Christopher Hildyard of Winestead, Francis Cobbe of Ottringham, and 300 other Holderness people met King Charles I at Keyingham and handed him a petition against Sir John Hotham’s actions in flooding farmland and taking livestock into Hull. The King was visiting The Providence, which had landed arms from Holland. The King sympathised, but said he could do nothing except raise troops, as he had no power to control Hotham.

On 6th July 1644, the Hull Committee of Sequestrations formally adjudged alderman James Watkinson a delinquent, 2 years after he left Hull to join the Royalist army, and they ordered that his post as alderman be filled by election.

On 6th July 1901, G.E. Conrad Naewiger complained in a letter to the Hull Daily Mail of the lack of steps to Aldbrough beach, a popular destination for works outings from Hull. photo shows Aldbrough cliff.

On 6th July 1910, Arthur Geoffrey Dickens was born in Hull. Professor of History at the University of Hull, he was elected Fellow of the British Academy. Considered the leading historian of the Reformation of his time. Awarded the Order of Merit by the German Government. (died 31.7.2001)

On 6th July 1921, Tilworth Grange was opened to ‘Female mental defectives’ (people with learning disabilities), the first provision in Hull for people who previously were sent to institutions in Bristol, Chesterfield and Ormskirk. Winestead Hall was bought in 1931 for men.

 

erosion aldboro.JPG

June 2nd

On 2nd June 1537, William Wood, prior of Bridlington, Sir Thomas Percy of Leconfield, George Lumley of Thwing and Sir Francis Bigod of Settrington were found guilty of treason and hanged at London’s Tyburn for their parts in the Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 2nd June 1838, Snowden Dunhill, 72 years, died in prison in Port Arthur, Tasmania. He was convicted of receiving stolen goods,   having been sentenced to 7 years transportation to Australia in 1823 for theft. He and his family had become notorious at home in Spaldington, near Howden, and after the publication of his life story in 1834 he became famous in England as a latter day Dick Turpin.

 

Pilgr Grace

May 25th

On 25th May 1537, Dr James Cockerell, Prior of Guisborough, was hanged, drawn and quartered for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace; he was vicar of Hessle from 1509-1519.

On 25th May 1693, Robert Jackson, under-keeper of the lighthouse at Spurn, locked himself in the lighthouse and secured the door when told a party of armed employees of Lord Dunbar (Lord of Holderness) were on their way to claim ownership. They undermined the walls and took Jackson prisoner to York Castle.

On 25th May 1770, the Driffield Canal Commissioners fully opened the new Driffield Canal, which gave the merchants of this then small hamlet access to the River Hull and the sea. Between 1784 and 1799, 6 warehouses were built at River Head, and new factories and cargo vessels used the canal. photo shows the canal today

On 25th May 1815, Parliament passed an Act to create the Pocklington Canal. Most of the subscribers were titled and/or landed gentry, but among those who bought shares at £100 were innkeepers, a blacksmith, saddler, grocer, and 4 single women (spinsters or widows).

On 25th May 1826, Mr Brown made a balloon ascent from Mr Thompson’s yard, Beverley, which was described as ‘splendid’. Winds took the balloon south west where it crash landed on the moors between Thorne and Crowle, Mr Brown sustaining an injury to his spine. He was able to travel to Sheffield for another balloon trip.

Driffield Canal