July 4th

On 4th July 1399, Henry Bolingbroke (later Henry IV) landed at Ravenspurn from France with 60 men, and was joined by the Earls of Northumberland (Percy) and Westmoreland (Neville), to claim the throne from Richard II. Photo shows memorial in Easington church.

On 4th July 1524, William Richerdson, husbandman, of North Newbald claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the ‘murderation’ of Anthony Godsale, husbandman of Newbald.

On 4th July 1597, William Anlaby or Andleby, a Catholic convert born in Etton, returned to UK as a priest after training in France.   He ministered to Catholic prisoners in Hull. Executed at York as a Catholic missionary priest. Beatified by the Catholic church in 1929.

On 4th July 1642, Sir John Hotham, aware that the Royalists surrounded Hull and had tried to cut off the fresh water supply, gave orders to open the sluices and cut the Humber banks in Drypool and Myton, outside the walls. He told farmers to bring their cattle and goods into the town. Hull was virtually unassailable.

On 4th July 1643, after defeat by the Royalists at Adwalton Moor, Sir Thomas Fairfax retreated to the only Parliamentary stronghold left in Yorkshire, Hull, just a few days after Hotham’s arrest.bolingbroke memorial Easington. jpg

May 20th

On 20th May 1604, Jack Wright of Welwick, Thomas Percy, second cousin of the Duke of Northumberland, Robin Catesby, Tom Wintour and Guido (Guy) Fawkes met at the Duck and Drake Inn, Strand, London, and began the Gunpowder Plot, which eventually included 13 conspirators, including Jack’s younger brother Kit.

On 20th May 1816, Constable Thomas Pashby was fined 40s at the Tiger Inn, Beverley, for neglect of his duty as village constable in Ellerker, apparently for failing to bring defendants to court.

On 20th May 1910, Dora Whitehand, aged 2, drowned on a sofa when the house in Providence Place, Driffield, was flooded. A cloudburst in Cowlam sent a torrent of water down the valley, flooding hundreds of houses to a depth of 6 feet. 2” rain fell in Driffield in an hour. Bridges were damaged, and the furnaces at the gasworks were extinguished. Weaverthorpe was submerged in mud; Helperthorpe and Elmswell were also affected.

On 20th May 1917, Francis Acaster, carpenter, aged 65 of Francis Terrace, Hull, was killed by enemy action whilst a merchant seaman, returning to Hull from Bombay on board SS Tycho of Hull, off Beachy Head.

On 20th May 1941, Dr R.H. Moyes. Voluntary Medical Officer to Civil Defence was awarded the British Empire Medal for gallantry during an air raid.

SS Tycho