July 5th

On 5th July 1532, Henry VIII’s charter was read out in Hull Market Place, and prohibited anyone but Hull burgesses from conducting business in the port; the corporation paid £31 19s4d to obtain the charter, part of which was paid in the form of a sturgeon for Thomas Cromwell.

On 5th July 1657, a major fire in Hedon starting at 1 a.m. resulted in the loss of 42 houses, and others damaged. In August, the Mayor petitioned Parliament for permission to hold a collection to raise money; £4,000 was raised.

On 5th July 1776, John Wesley paid a visit to Howden and preached to a large congregation during a thunderstorm near Station Road, Howden. Wesley’s picture below

On 5th July 1811, Bridlington Collector of Customs Benjamin Milne discovered a tidal spring near the quay, now commemorated by a stone inscription.

On 5th July 1899, Hull Alderman Larard took the controls of the city’s first municipal electric tram (Siemens Bros & Co provided the electrical equipment). A spectator hoping for a good view, climbed on the roof of the public lavatories and fell through.

On 5th July 1930, the annual King’s Cup Air Race took place on this date, and planes had to follow a route of around 800 miles. Hull Aerodrome was a main control station on the route. Tickets were sold for 1s and 2s6d. The winner was Miss Winifred Brown in an Avro Avian III. (N.B. Hull Aerodrome is actually in Preston South.)

 

john wesley

July 2nd

On 2nd July 1642, the Royalist ship Providence, commissioned by Queen Henrietta Maria, evaded Parliamentary ships by entering Keyingham Creek, which was too narrow for the larger ships, and landed a consignment of arms from Holland for the Royalist army. With help from local people, they unloaded ammunition which was taken to the king at York.

On the same day, the Royalist army secured Hull Bridge, Tickton, on the Beverley side, to prevent attacks from Hull and stop provisions reaching Hull, and evicted constable William Cuthbert and his family at midnight.

On 2nd July 1644, Sir Thomas Metham of Metham near Howden,  died at the Battle of Marston Moor fighting on the Royalist side, captain of the Yorkshire gentlemen volunteers.

On 2nd July 1830, Hull whaler Progress was wrecked in a storm when iced in near the Davis Strait; 19 whalers were wrecked or lost that season, 4 of them from Hull.

On 2nd July 1837, Hull whaler Swan was sighted off Spurn Point as a memorial service was being held in Hull for the crew. They had been away for over a year and had been trapped in ice. 25 of the 48 crew had died.

On 2nd July 1954, Harold Macmillan, Minister of Housing and Local Government, approved the amended Hull Development Plan, regenerating the city after the bomb damage of the war. Hull Georgian Society lamented the loss of buildings such as many on High Street, the whole of Nile Street and houses in Lowgate. Not all of the proposals came about – there was to have been a ‘town park’ open area from Holy Trinity to Princes Dock.

 

June 20th

Hull Corpn silver

 

On 20th June 1533, the Hull Mayor and town council sold to Sir Edmund Perkins the ornaments of the churches in the town, for £15. They also gave to Sir Frauncis Jobson, Treasurer of His Majesty’s jewellers, ’24oz of silver plate whereof 7oz were double gilt and the rest part gilt and plain white, handed over for His Majesty’s use’. photo shows some of today’s corporate treasures.

On 20th June 1579, Edward, son of Nicholas Symson of Thorpe, because of the outbreak of plague at Howden, had to be baptised at Eastrington rather than in the parish church.

On 20th June 1583, Hull agreed to 10s compensation to Richard Frere for the loss of hay and his cote during the time when plague was in the town.

On 20th June 1642, Maurice Corney, vicar of St Mary’s Hull and Capt William Thornton, comptroller of customs were discussed by Sir William Strickland, Mr Alured, Mr Peregrine Pelham and Mr John Hotham, as a danger to Parliament’s cause. Sir John Hotham ejected Corney from the town, and he left for York, despite being considered a hero for his work during the recent plague. Thornton was also turned out, and joined the King’s service.

On 20th June 1645, John Blenkarne, master of the Hull ship Anne Dorothy, was moored in Marstrand, Sweden. He accused crewmen Peacock and Dynnis of inciting mutiny when they came aboard drunk, threatened him, and after a night in custody refused to come aboard until threatened with imprisonment. When they returned to home port, the court of Trinity House fined them and jailed them for 24 hours.

On 20th June 1761, Beverley widow Elizabeth Courtney, of Walkergate, paid the bellman to go round the town announcing a reward of 3 guineas to anyone with information about bricks thrown through her windows the previous night.

On 20th June 1810, Hull Trinity House reported raising £300 in 9 weeks towards establishing a lifeboat at Spurn.

On 20th June 1895, an auction was held in 2 fields in Bransholme Lane, Sutton, of ‘The Sweep of the Scythe’ of 25 acres of ‘rich meadow’, and also the ‘Eatage of the Fog’ up to the end of the year. This appears to have been dialect for the sale of hay cut for fodder for cattle.

 

June 2nd

On 2nd June 1537, William Wood, prior of Bridlington, Sir Thomas Percy of Leconfield, George Lumley of Thwing and Sir Francis Bigod of Settrington were found guilty of treason and hanged at London’s Tyburn for their parts in the Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 2nd June 1838, Snowden Dunhill, 72 years, died in prison in Port Arthur, Tasmania. He was convicted of receiving stolen goods,   having been sentenced to 7 years transportation to Australia in 1823 for theft. He and his family had become notorious at home in Spaldington, near Howden, and after the publication of his life story in 1834 he became famous in England as a latter day Dick Turpin.

 

Pilgr Grace

May 23rd

On 23rd May 1260, William de Forz III, count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, died, aged about 45. He gave away his claim to the earldom of Chester in return for 2 small manors, including Driffield. Acted as ambassador for Henry III to Scotland and France, and was a member of the Council of Fifteen, advising the King on government matters. Gave land to Meaux Abbey on ‘the island called Ravenser Odd in the Humber’. His heir, Thomas, was 6 and he and the count’s lands were put into the King’s care.

On 23rd May 1510, Howden tiler Robert Colstayne claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for ‘the security of his body’; the register gives no detail of who was pursuing him, or why.

On 23rd May 1596, Howden churchwardens gave 6d to 2 poor men (presumably travelling through on their way to their home parish).

On 23rd May 1642, Hull Governor Sir John Hotham called a meeting of ‘knights and gentlemen’ to give a ‘learned speech’ explaining why he refused to allow King Charles into the town. This was part of the ‘paper war’ between the King and Parliament.

On 23rd May 1822, Hull merchant Joseph R. Pease attended a public meeting for the Relief of the Suffering Irish, due to famine in the West. He reported it thinly attended.

On 23rd May 1853, a Government enquiry into electoral corruption was opened at the Mansion House, Hull.  This followed a petition from the Conservative Party objecting to the election of James Clay and Viscount Goderich as MPs for Hull in the previous year. Hull was unrepresented in Parliament for almost 2 years; the Commission sat for 57 days and produced a report weighing over 11 tons and costing £5,000. (and see 16.8)

On 23rd May 1904, on Whit Monday, the Holderness Polo club held a polo match which attracted 6,000 spectators. This was held at the Polo Ground, Westbourne Avenue, Hull (modern Westbourne Ave West to Perth St West)The last matches were played in 1907.

On 23rd May 1907, the Mayoress of Hull opened a new military rifle range at Rolston, for use by Militia, Volunteers and Yeomanry. The land was leased from Rolston Hall.  below – Rolston Hall.

On 23rd May 1911, a fire began in the kitchen chimney of Sledmere House, which 24 hours later had destroyed the whole house. Fire engines from Driffield and Malton attended. There were no injuries.

 

 

Rolston Hall.jpg