June 23rd

Ezekiel Rogers window

Ezekiel Rogers window, Rowley church.

On 23rd June 1660, Reverend Ezekiel Rogers died aged 70, in Rowley, Massachusetts, after 22 years as vicar of a new Puritan settlement.  The new town was named after Rowley in East Yorkshire, from where he led a group of about 100 Puritans to America in June 1638. Became Rector of Rowley in 1621, aged 31, and served there for 17 years. (b 1590 in Wethersfield, Essex)

On 23rd June 1766, Sara Jenkinson, the infant daughter of Richard Jenkinson of Hutton Cranswick, fell from a little girl’s arms and died within 30 minutes. There was a coroner’s inquest.

On 23rd June 1768, John Courtney, aged 34, gentleman, of Beverley, married Mary Jesse Smelt, aged 24, at St Mary’s, Lowgate. The bride dressed in a white ‘night gown’ and white hat, the groom in a white suit. Only family and servants attended the church and family members dined with them afterwards. The bells of both churches rang for them. They returned to their future home in Beverley in the evening. In his diary, John refers to his future wife at all times as ‘Miss Smelt’.

On 23rd June 1787, the Clerk to the Beverley to Driffield Turnpike Trust wrote to T. Baxter, the owner of Bell Mills, Sunderlandwick, threatening him with prosecution if he allowed anyone to cross his land to avoid paying tolls. 2 months later the Trust asked T. Baxter to lock the gate near his mill, and to prosecute anyone who broke it down.

On 23rd June 1812, Major-General Barnard Foord Bowes of Cowlam was wounded at Battle of Badajoz, but recovered to fight at Salamanca.

On 23rd June 1848, Uckaluk died of measles aboard the Hull ship Truelove, on their way home to Nyadlik, Greenland. She and her husband Memiadluk had visited England to highlight the poor conditions in their homeland.  They took part in talks in Manchester and York. 

On 23rd June 1853, Captain John (or Thomas) Bowlby set sail for Cumberland Sound in the Arctic with 3 ships, with the aim of forming a settlement there; they took goats and building materials. The surgeon on the trip was William Gedney, who had been on board the Truelove with Captain Parker in 1847.

On 23rd June 1898, Winifred Holtby was born at Rudston. Social reformer, novelist and journalist, she was famous and respected for her work in South Africa and elsewhere. ‘South Riding’ became her most famous novel, published after her death. She is buried in Rudston. (d 29.9.1935)

June 8th

On 8th June 1300, a year after Hull’s establishment, King Edward I gave a charter to allow the mayor and aldermen to pave the major streets, with a central gutter for ease of drainage. The work began in 1301.

On 8th June 1661, King Charles II wrote a letter to the Hull Mayor, prohibiting John Shaw from preaching in Holy Trinity, as he was too radical a Puritan. He retained his post as Master of the Charterhouse, and his sermons there continued to draw large crowds, but he resigned the following year.

On 8th June 1806, in a kitchen accident, in Hull, Mrs Lambert reported being struck on the back by a large hanging lump of sugar she had dislodged; she expected that if it had hit her on the head, she would have died.

On 8th June 1815, the Commissioner of Customs acquired the former Neptune Inn, Whitefriargate, as a Custom House. The Inn had opened in 1797, but had never made the expected profit of a first-class coaching inn. The building now houses Boots Chemists.

On 8th June 1821, the troopship Thomas of London was driven on to the Binks sands, in the Humber; the 26 troops, crew, 2 women and a child were rescued, and 1 woman drowned, despite brave attempts by the captain, Lieutenant Pritchard, to save her. The operation by Robert Richardson, master of the Spurn lifeboat, and crew, took 11 hours.

On 8th June 1829, Ira Aldridge, celebrated American actor of African heritage, performed in Hull for the first time, at the Theatre Royal, Humber Street; over a long and distinguished career he visited Hull several times, and performed at the Nag’s Head, Driffield in 1841.

 

Ira-Aldridge-Covent-Garden-1833-public-domain1

June 5th

On 5th June 1618, ‘Blind Richie’ (Richard Graham of Millhill) had walked from the Scottish borders to seek help from Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, at Londesborough, and was given a pension of 10s a year. It is not known what his relationship was to the Earl, who had lands on the Scottish border.

On 5th June 1778, Beilby Thompson of Escrick created a deer park, and demolished most of the village houses, rebuilding them out of sight of the Hall, and recycling the bricks; he paid 5s to Mr Scott the millwright for demolishing the horse mill.

On 5th June 1854, Dr Playfair, from the Dept of Science, reported on the teaching at Hull Trinity House School that no geometry or algebra was taught; geography was badly taught; no empirical data given on laws regulating winds, currents and weather.

On 5th June 1915, German Lieut-Capt Boemack made the first Zeppelin air raid on Yorkshire, dropping bombs on Driffield and Hedon before aborting the mission. There were no casualties, although house windows were broken in Beckside, Driffield, and crops were damaged. Crowds of people flocked to Driffield the following day to view the damage.

 

beilby thompson

June 1st

On 1st June 1787, William Wilberforce asked the King to make a Royal Proclamation for the Encouragement of Piety and Virtue. Concerned at the large number of death sentences being carried out, he reasoned that those punished for small crimes, such as swearing, would be less likely to commit serious crimes, such as murder. The Society for the Reformation of Manners was established in Hull as a result.

On 1st June 1798, William Wickham, Superintendent of Aliens, wrote advising on the tightening of the Aliens Act, with particular relation to Italian pedlars landing at Hull.

On 1st June 1820, Rev Arthur Strickland and 6 other gentlemen adopted the rules of the Bridlington Cricket Club; cricket was clearly a game for the gentry, as subscriptions were 10s6d. Visitors and occasional residents could be invited to play for the summer. the pitch was in the field between Bessingby and the mill.

On 1st June 1829, Hull’s Junction Dock opened, completing the line of docks connecting the Hull and the Humber, along the line of the old wall . Later renamed Princes Dock after HRH the Prince Consort.

On 1st June 1853, Malton & Driffield Junction Railway opened its 19 miles of track to public traffic.

On 1st June 1875, Alice Elizabeth Rawson was the first person to be baptised in the newly created parish of Newington, in Newington parish Mission Room, Edinburgh St, before the church was built in 1878.

On 1st June 1891, the Royal Baccarat Scandal trial was the first time the heir to the throne was called as a witness in court. It began at a house party at Tranby Croft, Anlaby, (now Hull Collegiate School) home of Charles Wilson,  when Sir William Gordon-Cumming was accused of cheating at cards. Gordon-Cumming lost the slander case, and was dismissed from his army post the day after the trial ended. photo shows Charles Wilson’s memorial in Warter church.

Chas Wilson Nunburnholme

May 25th

On 25th May 1537, Dr James Cockerell, Prior of Guisborough, was hanged, drawn and quartered for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace; he was vicar of Hessle from 1509-1519.

On 25th May 1693, Robert Jackson, under-keeper of the lighthouse at Spurn, locked himself in the lighthouse and secured the door when told a party of armed employees of Lord Dunbar (Lord of Holderness) were on their way to claim ownership. They undermined the walls and took Jackson prisoner to York Castle.

On 25th May 1770, the Driffield Canal Commissioners fully opened the new Driffield Canal, which gave the merchants of this then small hamlet access to the River Hull and the sea. Between 1784 and 1799, 6 warehouses were built at River Head, and new factories and cargo vessels used the canal. photo shows the canal today

On 25th May 1815, Parliament passed an Act to create the Pocklington Canal. Most of the subscribers were titled and/or landed gentry, but among those who bought shares at £100 were innkeepers, a blacksmith, saddler, grocer, and 4 single women (spinsters or widows).

On 25th May 1826, Mr Brown made a balloon ascent from Mr Thompson’s yard, Beverley, which was described as ‘splendid’. Winds took the balloon south west where it crash landed on the moors between Thorne and Crowle, Mr Brown sustaining an injury to his spine. He was able to travel to Sheffield for another balloon trip.

Driffield Canal

May 23rd

On 23rd May 1260, William de Forz III, count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, died, aged about 45. He gave away his claim to the earldom of Chester in return for 2 small manors, including Driffield. Acted as ambassador for Henry III to Scotland and France, and was a member of the Council of Fifteen, advising the King on government matters. Gave land to Meaux Abbey on ‘the island called Ravenser Odd in the Humber’. His heir, Thomas, was 6 and he and the count’s lands were put into the King’s care.

On 23rd May 1510, Howden tiler Robert Colstayne claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for ‘the security of his body’; the register gives no detail of who was pursuing him, or why.

On 23rd May 1596, Howden churchwardens gave 6d to 2 poor men (presumably travelling through on their way to their home parish).

On 23rd May 1642, Hull Governor Sir John Hotham called a meeting of ‘knights and gentlemen’ to give a ‘learned speech’ explaining why he refused to allow King Charles into the town. This was part of the ‘paper war’ between the King and Parliament.

On 23rd May 1822, Hull merchant Joseph R. Pease attended a public meeting for the Relief of the Suffering Irish, due to famine in the West. He reported it thinly attended.

On 23rd May 1853, a Government enquiry into electoral corruption was opened at the Mansion House, Hull.  This followed a petition from the Conservative Party objecting to the election of James Clay and Viscount Goderich as MPs for Hull in the previous year. Hull was unrepresented in Parliament for almost 2 years; the Commission sat for 57 days and produced a report weighing over 11 tons and costing £5,000. (and see 16.8)

On 23rd May 1904, on Whit Monday, the Holderness Polo club held a polo match which attracted 6,000 spectators. This was held at the Polo Ground, Westbourne Avenue, Hull (modern Westbourne Ave West to Perth St West)The last matches were played in 1907.

On 23rd May 1907, the Mayoress of Hull opened a new military rifle range at Rolston, for use by Militia, Volunteers and Yeomanry. The land was leased from Rolston Hall.  below – Rolston Hall.

On 23rd May 1911, a fire began in the kitchen chimney of Sledmere House, which 24 hours later had destroyed the whole house. Fire engines from Driffield and Malton attended. There were no injuries.

 

 

Rolston Hall.jpg

 

May 20th

On 20th May 1604, Jack Wright of Welwick, Thomas Percy, second cousin of the Duke of Northumberland, Robin Catesby, Tom Wintour and Guido (Guy) Fawkes met at the Duck and Drake Inn, Strand, London, and began the Gunpowder Plot, which eventually included 13 conspirators, including Jack’s younger brother Kit.

On 20th May 1816, Constable Thomas Pashby was fined 40s at the Tiger Inn, Beverley, for neglect of his duty as village constable in Ellerker, apparently for failing to bring defendants to court.

On 20th May 1910, Dora Whitehand, aged 2, drowned on a sofa when the house in Providence Place, Driffield, was flooded. A cloudburst in Cowlam sent a torrent of water down the valley, flooding hundreds of houses to a depth of 6 feet. 2” rain fell in Driffield in an hour. Bridges were damaged, and the furnaces at the gasworks were extinguished. Weaverthorpe was submerged in mud; Helperthorpe and Elmswell were also affected.

On 20th May 1917, Francis Acaster, carpenter, aged 65 of Francis Terrace, Hull, was killed by enemy action whilst a merchant seaman, returning to Hull from Bombay on board SS Tycho of Hull, off Beachy Head.

On 20th May 1941, Dr R.H. Moyes. Voluntary Medical Officer to Civil Defence was awarded the British Empire Medal for gallantry during an air raid.

SS Tycho