June 19th

On 19th June 1256, the Meaux Abbey chronicler reported losing men and oxen at Orwithfleet, south of Patrington. A major flood of the Humber reached as far north as Cottingham, with many lives lost, livestock and fisheries devastated, and land washed into the river.

On 19th June 1607, Thomas Wincop, Master of Hull Charterhouse, bought, with Hull Mayor George Almond and other trustees, land in Haltemprice Wood abutting on the common fields of Willerby, to support the running costs; the Charterhouse already owned substantial property in and around Hull. photo shows Wincop’s memorial in Hull Minster.

On 19th June 1837, Hull Steam Packet Company launched the paddle steamer Victoria at Medley’s shipyard, Hull; she was considered state of the art. A boiler explosion in 1838 killed 5 crew; there was a second explosion the same year; she ran onto rocks in 1852 and was wrecked, with 8 people killed.

On the same day, Rev Joseph Coltman died in Beverley at the age of 60. He was known for his support of local charities, of the emancipation of Catholics, and of the abolition of slavery. Born in Hull, Coltman Street was named for him, as was Beverley’s Coltman Avenue. At 37 stone 8lbs, he was reputed to be the heaviest man in England, and his death may have been caused by his weight. He employed a manservant to turn him in bed, but he fell asleep and Coltman suffocated in his sleep.

On 19th June 1887, to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Jubilee, a state service was held in Holy Trinity church, Hull, the new Market Hall was opened, as was East Park, and there were festivities in all the city’s wards.

On 19th June 1920, Harry Wilkinson of  Lower Union Street, Hull, was seriously injured by 3 gunshots.  He was part of a mob of white people who attacked and damaged several boarding houses where black seamen lived. Tom Toby, a West African fireman, was charged with wounding, but no white people were arrested. Toby’s plea of self defence was accepted, and he was found not guilty. During the same rioting, Murrell Piggott, faced with a 200-strong crowd, had also fired, but his plea of self defence was not accepted, and he was sentenced to 9 months’ hard labour for unlawful wounding.

On 19th June 1940, the East Hull, docks, suburbs, and River Hull corridor experienced the first night-time raid of World War 2.

 

Thomas Whincopp memorial

June 1st

On 1st June 1787, William Wilberforce asked the King to make a Royal Proclamation for the Encouragement of Piety and Virtue. Concerned at the large number of death sentences being carried out, he reasoned that those punished for small crimes, such as swearing, would be less likely to commit serious crimes, such as murder. The Society for the Reformation of Manners was established in Hull as a result.

On 1st June 1798, William Wickham, Superintendent of Aliens, wrote advising on the tightening of the Aliens Act, with particular relation to Italian pedlars landing at Hull.

On 1st June 1820, Rev Arthur Strickland and 6 other gentlemen adopted the rules of the Bridlington Cricket Club; cricket was clearly a game for the gentry, as subscriptions were 10s6d. Visitors and occasional residents could be invited to play for the summer. the pitch was in the field between Bessingby and the mill.

On 1st June 1829, Hull’s Junction Dock opened, completing the line of docks connecting the Hull and the Humber, along the line of the old wall . Later renamed Princes Dock after HRH the Prince Consort.

On 1st June 1853, Malton & Driffield Junction Railway opened its 19 miles of track to public traffic.

On 1st June 1875, Alice Elizabeth Rawson was the first person to be baptised in the newly created parish of Newington, in Newington parish Mission Room, Edinburgh St, before the church was built in 1878.

On 1st June 1891, the Royal Baccarat Scandal trial was the first time the heir to the throne was called as a witness in court. It began at a house party at Tranby Croft, Anlaby, (now Hull Collegiate School) home of Charles Wilson,  when Sir William Gordon-Cumming was accused of cheating at cards. Gordon-Cumming lost the slander case, and was dismissed from his army post the day after the trial ended. photo shows Charles Wilson’s memorial in Warter church.

Chas Wilson Nunburnholme

May 29th

On 29th May 1896, Rev Henry Frederick Barnes-Lawrence died aged 81 at Bridlington Quay. He had been Rector of Bridlington Priory church for 25 years, overseeing its restoration by Sir George Gilbert Scott. He had been a keen birder, and set up the Association for the Protection of Sea-birds, forerunner of the RSPB. His memorial is in the Priory Church.

On 29th May 1941, an air raid demolished 5 office boxes and damaged 9 others in St Andrew’s Dock, Hull. Damage to ARP unit, wagons, fish sidings and an air raid shelter.

On 29th May 1999, Fernand Laville, Free French veteran, presented Nafferton parish council with a regimental plaque to commemorate the billeting of Free French soldiers in the village during WW2. 16 veterans returned to Nafferton for a reunion.

Barnes-Lawrence

 

May 19th

On 19th May 1401, Isabel Fauconberg, of Skelton (nee Bigod at Settrington) died, and had 13 paupers dressed in russet attend her funeral.

On 19th May 1942, John William Collins, warden and Charles Andrews, soldier, were recommended for gallantry awards for rescuing horses from the LNER stables. Holderness Road, Hull, during an air raid. The raid targeted Alexandra and Victoria docks. 4 people were killed.

 

May 18th

On 18th May 1516, Robert Bradlay of Halifax claimed the sanctuary of St John ‘s church Beverley for debt. Fugitives from justice often travelled long distances to get to a registered sanctuary, in order to be safe for a time from their pursuers. photo shows the Frith Stool in the Minster, the innermost sanctuary.

On 18th May 1957, Queen Elizabeth II visited Hull for the day and while here visited one of the new houses on Longhill Estate. She also visited Paragon Station, Paragon Square, St Andrews Dock, St Andrews Dock Surgery, Hull University, the Sailors’ Children’s Society, Hull Royal Infirmary, the Guildhall, King George dock, East Park, Wilton House, and Corporation Pier. She had 184 people presented to her, from the Archbishop of York to Mrs Annie Nock, fish house worker.

 

minster - frith stool.JPG

May 16th

On 16th May 1478, Robert Bilton, husbandman, from Hutton Cranswick, sought sanctuary in the Collegiate Church of St John (now the Minster) for the homicide of Thomas Mathyn at Cranswick.

On 16th May 1678, Christopher Richardson, Hull surgeon, apothecary and alderman, was refused permission to stand down as alderman, even after agreeing to pay a fine of £75. Aged 65, he continued to attend Corporation meetings until his death in 1702. Had previously been Sheriff of Hull (1665) and Mayor twice (1660 and 1678).

On 16th May 1917, former Reckitt’s employeed Private Thomas Samuel Taylor was killed in action, serving with 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers. No known grave.

On 16th May 1941, one of the worst nights of bombing saw 57 dead in East Hull, including 50 in the Ellis Terrace air raid shelter, which took a direct hit. 20 others were injured in Holderness Road, Hedon Road and Alexandra Dock.

On 16th May 1952, Hammond’s new Ferensway store opened to replace the building bombed during WW2. In the ’Celebration offers’, oak dining tables were on sale for £7 10s. photo shows the old building during the war.hammonds blitz

 

May 15th

FlambroughOn 15th May 1498, Robert Barker of Wistow, near Selby claimed sanctuary at Beverley’s  church of St John, for the murder of John Towree at Wistow on 9th May.

On 15th May 1591, priest Robert Thorpe, and Thomas Watkinson were executed at York – Thorpe being hanged, drawn and quartered for treason, and Watkinson hanged as a felon for harbouring priests. Both were arrested at Menthorpe on Palm Sunday, when neighbours saw palms being taken into Watkinson’s house, by the local magistrate John Gates.

On 15th May 1613, Lady Grissell Clifford, Countess of Cumberland, died, aged 54 at Londesborough. She appears to have been generous to the local poor, and almost the entire female populations of Londesborough and Shipton attended her funeral. Memorial in Londesbrough church.

On 15th May 1618, Phillip Constable of Wassand Hall was killed in a duel at White Cross, Leven, by Edmund (or Edward) Percy. Constable buried in Goxhill. Difficult to verify any details, except that Philip Constable died in 1618, and that duels were considered a foreign introduction at the time.

On 15th May 1896, a temporary dam created during building work for the Fish Dock extension, Hull, burst, and the sudden rush of water smashed and sank the fishing smack Young Greg.

On 15th May 1951, motor mechanic Edward Slaughter, of the Flambrough lifeboat crew, was awarded an RNLI bronze medal and Mrs Porter’s Award (given annually for the bravest deed of the year by a lifeboat man). A boy was badly injured falling 150 feet from the Flambrough cliffs, and E.S. swam to him, got him on to a stretcher and guided the stretcher to the cliff top.