August 9th

Bishop's Palace, Howden

On 9th August 1260, Walter of Kirkham, Bishop of Durham, died at the Bishop’s Palace, Howden. His body was taken to Durham for burial but his viscera were buried in the church. photo shows what remains of Bishop’s Palace.

On 9th August 1516, Sir Ralph Ellerker of Risby confessed to Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, Archbishop of York, that he ordered his servants Henry Norham and Roberte Hunt to kidnap George Millet, keeper of Beverley Parks, and imprison him in Cottingham Park so that he could hunt on the Archbishop’s land. Pleading poverty, he was bound over in the sum of £200.

On 9th August 1769, John Burrill of Skipsea assaulted John Warcup with swords, staves, knives and clubs so that his life was threatened and ‘other wrongs’. Burrill was indicted in September, found guilty on 24.4.1770, and sentenced 2.10.1770 to a fine of £20 and to remain in gaol until the fine was paid.

On 9th August 1785, Rev George Lambert went to see a 24 foot whale killed and displayed at South End, Hull (near modern pier); described by sailors as a young bottlenecked grampus.

On 9th August 1859, Hansard records the 29.4.1859 election in Beverley void; Ralph Walters was declared ‘not a Burgess to serve in this present Parliament for the Borough of Beverley’ and Henry Edwards was declared MP in his place. Joseph Robinson Pease in his diary called Walters ‘an adventurer, arriving 3 days previously’, ‘by open bribery …. carried the day.’

On 9th August 1902, William Day Keyworth junior, sculptor, died aged 59 in Spring Bank, Hull. He produced many statues of civic dignitaries, including Andrew Marvell, Anthony Bannister and William Wilberforce (now outside Wilberforce House). Shot himself in the head at his home, but left no suicide note.

On the same day, Nafferton villagers were celebrating King Edward VII’s coronation with, among other events, a ‘comic’ cricket match, gentlemen vs ladies, which the ladies won. The score is not recorded.

On 9th August 1915, 17 Goole residents, mostly women and children, were killed by a Zeppelin raid on the town and docks.

On 9th August 1916, a Zeppelin raid on Anlaby Road, Hull,  killed John Broadley aged 3 and at least 7 other residents, and injured about 20. 2 people died of shock. Rev A.W. Carter, Assistant Priest of Newington Church, was badly hurt.

 

July 3rd

On 3rd July 1267, Alice Falketon was given permission by the church authorities to build herself a house in St Nicholas Churchyard, so that she could live as an anchoress. Enquiries had been made as to whether she was a fit person, with enough funds to maintain herself, and if this would be convenient to the parish.

On 3rd July 1524, Peter Gornarr, tanner, of Bridlington, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of Robert Skelton of Bridlington, a tailor.

On 3rd July 1642, King Charles I set up his court in Beverley at the house of Lady Gee, North Bar Within, and quartered his forces (about 3,000 infantry and 1,000 cavalry) in and around Anlaby, Cottingham and Newland.

On 3rd July 1797, Hull Trinity House paid £2 10s to William Brand, James Hayes, Samuel Harrison and J. Peterson, whose ship the Argo had been captured.

On 3rd July 1850, Mr T. Firbank, Chairman of Hull Dock Company,  opened Victoria Dock, the first of Hull’s docks east of the River Hull.

On 3rd July 1892, a great flood at Langtoft reached a height of 7 ½ feet.

Beverley Minster

June 27th

On 27th June 1658, William Thorpe, clerk to the parish of Ellerker (which may have meant minister) was buried in Ellerker. In his will he gave 10s to be paid yearly for the relief of the poor ‘for ever’.

On 27th June 1908, Princes Avenue Wesleyan Sunday School held its Annual Treat at the Old Polo Ground,  Westbourne Avenue, Hull. Games were played before tea, with races and balloons after, and prizes given.

On 27th June 1927, Thomas Jacques Somerscales, RA, died aged 85 in Princes Avenue, Hull. A respected marine artist who began his professional career in Valparaiso, Chile, and later returned as an unknown to his native country, where his work can be seen in the Tate Gallery. (b Hull 29.10.1842)

On 27th June 2010, Barbara Buttrick was inducted into the Florida Boxing Hall of Fame, aged 80. Born in Cottingham in 1930, she began boxing in 1945, married her manager and moved to Florida in 1952. At 4’ 11”, she was known as the Mighty Atom.  She retired from boxing with a record of 30:1:1.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTvwtinq5qg thomas-somerscales-port-of-iquique-chile-1903-thomas-somerscales

June 19th

On 19th June 1256, the Meaux Abbey chronicler reported losing men and oxen at Orwithfleet, south of Patrington. A major flood of the Humber reached as far north as Cottingham, with many lives lost, livestock and fisheries devastated, and land washed into the river.

On 19th June 1607, Thomas Wincop, Master of Hull Charterhouse, bought, with Hull Mayor George Almond and other trustees, land in Haltemprice Wood abutting on the common fields of Willerby, to support the running costs; the Charterhouse already owned substantial property in and around Hull. photo shows Wincop’s memorial in Hull Minster.

On 19th June 1837, Hull Steam Packet Company launched the paddle steamer Victoria at Medley’s shipyard, Hull; she was considered state of the art. A boiler explosion in 1838 killed 5 crew; there was a second explosion the same year; she ran onto rocks in 1852 and was wrecked, with 8 people killed.

On the same day, Rev Joseph Coltman died in Beverley at the age of 60. He was known for his support of local charities, of the emancipation of Catholics, and of the abolition of slavery. Born in Hull, Coltman Street was named for him, as was Beverley’s Coltman Avenue. At 37 stone 8lbs, he was reputed to be the heaviest man in England, and his death may have been caused by his weight. He employed a manservant to turn him in bed, but he fell asleep and Coltman suffocated in his sleep.

On 19th June 1887, to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Jubilee, a state service was held in Holy Trinity church, Hull, the new Market Hall was opened, as was East Park, and there were festivities in all the city’s wards.

On 19th June 1920, Harry Wilkinson of  Lower Union Street, Hull, was seriously injured by 3 gunshots.  He was part of a mob of white people who attacked and damaged several boarding houses where black seamen lived. Tom Toby, a West African fireman, was charged with wounding, but no white people were arrested. Toby’s plea of self defence was accepted, and he was found not guilty. During the same rioting, Murrell Piggott, faced with a 200-strong crowd, had also fired, but his plea of self defence was not accepted, and he was sentenced to 9 months’ hard labour for unlawful wounding.

On 19th June 1940, the East Hull, docks, suburbs, and River Hull corridor experienced the first night-time raid of World War 2.

 

Thomas Whincopp memorial

June 14th

On 14th June 1505, Thomas Wryght, husbandman of Hull, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley; the register does not state for what offence he was being pursued.

On 14th June 1702, the congregation of Cottingham church raised 8s 1/4d in a collection for the repair of St Germain’s church at Selby.

On 14th June 1772, John Robinson, yeoman and Susannah Evans, spinster, both of Skipsea, left Susannah’s 3-year-old illegitimate daughter on a dungheap in Gransmoor to die. Robinson was fined, to remain in gaol until the fine was paid; Evans’ sentence appears to have been 2 weeks on bread and water in prison, the crime described in the court record as a ‘misdemeanour’. (Presumably, the child was severely ill, injured and/or disabled if she remained where she was put).

Beverley Minster