August 16th

Ebenezer Cobb Morley

 

On 16th August 1831, Ebenezer Cobb Morley was born in Princess Street, Hull, became a solicitor, an oarsman (he founded the Barnes and Mortlake Regatta), a footballer (he played in the first ever Football Association match), proposed the meeting which led to the creation of the FA, and drafted the first FA Laws of the Game in 1863. (d 20.11.1924)

On 16th August 1853, after 57 days, the Government Commission of Enquiry into Electoral Corruption held at the Mansion House, Hull, ended, and concluded that immense amounts of political corruption had been practised, but that other boroughs were equally corrupt. As a result, a Bribery Act was passed in 1854. In 1857, James Clay and Viscount Goderich (later Lord Ashley), the cause of the original complaint, were both re-elected with increased majorities. (and see 23.5)

On 16th August 1931, Charles Hudson, 53,  of Hessle was lost at sea during the Fastnet Ocean Yacht Race. (b 20.1.1878)

August 9th

Bishop's Palace, Howden

On 9th August 1260, Walter of Kirkham, Bishop of Durham, died at the Bishop’s Palace, Howden. His body was taken to Durham for burial but his viscera were buried in the church. photo shows what remains of Bishop’s Palace.

On 9th August 1516, Sir Ralph Ellerker of Risby confessed to Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, Archbishop of York, that he ordered his servants Henry Norham and Roberte Hunt to kidnap George Millet, keeper of Beverley Parks, and imprison him in Cottingham Park so that he could hunt on the Archbishop’s land. Pleading poverty, he was bound over in the sum of £200.

On 9th August 1769, John Burrill of Skipsea assaulted John Warcup with swords, staves, knives and clubs so that his life was threatened and ‘other wrongs’. Burrill was indicted in September, found guilty on 24.4.1770, and sentenced 2.10.1770 to a fine of £20 and to remain in gaol until the fine was paid.

On 9th August 1785, Rev George Lambert went to see a 24 foot whale killed and displayed at South End, Hull (near modern pier); described by sailors as a young bottlenecked grampus.

On 9th August 1859, Hansard records the 29.4.1859 election in Beverley void; Ralph Walters was declared ‘not a Burgess to serve in this present Parliament for the Borough of Beverley’ and Henry Edwards was declared MP in his place. Joseph Robinson Pease in his diary called Walters ‘an adventurer, arriving 3 days previously’, ‘by open bribery …. carried the day.’

On 9th August 1902, William Day Keyworth junior, sculptor, died aged 59 in Spring Bank, Hull. He produced many statues of civic dignitaries, including Andrew Marvell, Anthony Bannister and William Wilberforce (now outside Wilberforce House). Shot himself in the head at his home, but left no suicide note.

On the same day, Nafferton villagers were celebrating King Edward VII’s coronation with, among other events, a ‘comic’ cricket match, gentlemen vs ladies, which the ladies won. The score is not recorded.

On 9th August 1915, 17 Goole residents, mostly women and children, were killed by a Zeppelin raid on the town and docks.

On 9th August 1916, a Zeppelin raid on Anlaby Road, Hull,  killed John Broadley aged 3 and at least 7 other residents, and injured about 20. 2 people died of shock. Rev A.W. Carter, Assistant Priest of Newington Church, was badly hurt.

 

June 3rd

On 3rd June 1642, a few weeks after being refused entry into Hull, King Charles I called a meeting of the Yorkshire gentry at Heworth Moor, near York, and 70,000 attended. 200 young men volunteered to form a bodyguard for the King. The 2 Hilyard brothers of Winestead, Henry and Robert, attended, and volunteered. Many other ER people must also have attended.

On 3rd June 1717, Thomas Watson died aged 80. Born in Hull, he was created Bishop of St David’s, and in 1707 built almshouses in North Church Side. Supported James II in 1688. He lost his ecclesiastical offices in 1699 for selling church property or offices, and reputedly died a rich man. (b 1.3.1637) The picture shows the almshouses.

On 3rd June 1801, when their husbands were killed by the Danes in a military engagement off Copenhagen, the widows of Matthew Cobb and James Davis, Humber pilots, were given financial support by Hull Trinity House at 10s 6d per week, 6 weeks and 4 weeks respectively.

 

Bishop Watson's Hospital

May 23rd

On 23rd May 1260, William de Forz III, count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, died, aged about 45. He gave away his claim to the earldom of Chester in return for 2 small manors, including Driffield. Acted as ambassador for Henry III to Scotland and France, and was a member of the Council of Fifteen, advising the King on government matters. Gave land to Meaux Abbey on ‘the island called Ravenser Odd in the Humber’. His heir, Thomas, was 6 and he and the count’s lands were put into the King’s care.

On 23rd May 1510, Howden tiler Robert Colstayne claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for ‘the security of his body’; the register gives no detail of who was pursuing him, or why.

On 23rd May 1596, Howden churchwardens gave 6d to 2 poor men (presumably travelling through on their way to their home parish).

On 23rd May 1642, Hull Governor Sir John Hotham called a meeting of ‘knights and gentlemen’ to give a ‘learned speech’ explaining why he refused to allow King Charles into the town. This was part of the ‘paper war’ between the King and Parliament.

On 23rd May 1822, Hull merchant Joseph R. Pease attended a public meeting for the Relief of the Suffering Irish, due to famine in the West. He reported it thinly attended.

On 23rd May 1853, a Government enquiry into electoral corruption was opened at the Mansion House, Hull.  This followed a petition from the Conservative Party objecting to the election of James Clay and Viscount Goderich as MPs for Hull in the previous year. Hull was unrepresented in Parliament for almost 2 years; the Commission sat for 57 days and produced a report weighing over 11 tons and costing £5,000. (and see 16.8)

On 23rd May 1904, on Whit Monday, the Holderness Polo club held a polo match which attracted 6,000 spectators. This was held at the Polo Ground, Westbourne Avenue, Hull (modern Westbourne Ave West to Perth St West)The last matches were played in 1907.

On 23rd May 1907, the Mayoress of Hull opened a new military rifle range at Rolston, for use by Militia, Volunteers and Yeomanry. The land was leased from Rolston Hall.  below – Rolston Hall.

On 23rd May 1911, a fire began in the kitchen chimney of Sledmere House, which 24 hours later had destroyed the whole house. Fire engines from Driffield and Malton attended. There were no injuries.

 

 

Rolston Hall.jpg