June 10th

On 10th June 1402, John Tutbury, Mayor of Hull, was granted a licence, with William Tyrry (Terry) and their companions, to profit from the seizure of goods aboard a Prussian ship heading for Scotland which they took ‘in the king’s service’. These days, we would call it piracy. When it became clear the ship they took had actually been transporting provisions to Henry’s troops in Berwick, Tutbury and Terry were ordered to pay compensation to the owners.

On 10th June 1708, Adam Alvin, manservant, murdered his employer, the Owthorne  vicar, Enoch Sinclare, with a spade, and later married Sinclare’s niece Mary; they later moved to Lincolnshire to run a public house. The body was not found for 4 years, when Mary’s sister revealed the concealed body. Alvin was tried, found guilty and hanged at York. Sinclare’s body, in a lead coffin, was one of those which fell into the sea, and was reinterred in the churchyard, which itself later fell into the sea.

On 10th June 1913, the Assembly Rooms, Seaside Road, Withernsea, were destroyed in a fire; the area became a skating rink, and later a fun fair and amusements.

 

W'sea pier

June 1st

On 1st June 1787, William Wilberforce asked the King to make a Royal Proclamation for the Encouragement of Piety and Virtue. Concerned at the large number of death sentences being carried out, he reasoned that those punished for small crimes, such as swearing, would be less likely to commit serious crimes, such as murder. The Society for the Reformation of Manners was established in Hull as a result.

On 1st June 1798, William Wickham, Superintendent of Aliens, wrote advising on the tightening of the Aliens Act, with particular relation to Italian pedlars landing at Hull.

On 1st June 1820, Rev Arthur Strickland and 6 other gentlemen adopted the rules of the Bridlington Cricket Club; cricket was clearly a game for the gentry, as subscriptions were 10s6d. Visitors and occasional residents could be invited to play for the summer. the pitch was in the field between Bessingby and the mill.

On 1st June 1829, Hull’s Junction Dock opened, completing the line of docks connecting the Hull and the Humber, along the line of the old wall . Later renamed Princes Dock after HRH the Prince Consort.

On 1st June 1853, Malton & Driffield Junction Railway opened its 19 miles of track to public traffic.

On 1st June 1875, Alice Elizabeth Rawson was the first person to be baptised in the newly created parish of Newington, in Newington parish Mission Room, Edinburgh St, before the church was built in 1878.

On 1st June 1891, the Royal Baccarat Scandal trial was the first time the heir to the throne was called as a witness in court. It began at a house party at Tranby Croft, Anlaby, (now Hull Collegiate School) home of Charles Wilson,  when Sir William Gordon-Cumming was accused of cheating at cards. Gordon-Cumming lost the slander case, and was dismissed from his army post the day after the trial ended. photo shows Charles Wilson’s memorial in Warter church.

Chas Wilson Nunburnholme

May 30th

On 30th May 1778, Frank Slaiter returned to work at Escrick Hall 4 ½ months after breaking his thigh at work. His employer, Beilby Thompson, paid his medical fees, and gave him an allowance of 2/3 his normal wage while he was off sick.

On 30th May 1782, Rev George Lambert and Mr Towers began a journey to London with a ferry crossing of the Humber, which took 3 hours; it took from 11a.m. to the evening to reach Lincoln by coach. They arrived in London about 50 hours after leaving Hull. This was probably typical for the time.

On 30th May 1820, William Bradley died aged 33 of tuberculosis in  Market Weighton. Known as the Yorkshire Giant, he grew to 7’9”. Travelled with shows and fairs, and later charged visitors to his home. Was presented to King George III. (b 10.2.1787)

On 30th May 1859, a Hull Coroner’s Court jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against Isabella Hewson.  On 27.5 she had hanged her son, aged 2, and then gave herself up to police. No evidence of insanity was found on medical examination.

On 30th May 1912, Brigadier Mark Sykes inspected the Yorkshire Catholic Reformatory, Market Weighton, and found lack of discipline, bullying, filth, poor food, lack of fire precautions and drill, and poor medical treatment. Recommended all staff but one be dismissed. The management of the school was changed later that year.

 

Yorks reformatory

 

 

 

 

 

May 16th

On 16th May 1478, Robert Bilton, husbandman, from Hutton Cranswick, sought sanctuary in the Collegiate Church of St John (now the Minster) for the homicide of Thomas Mathyn at Cranswick.

On 16th May 1678, Christopher Richardson, Hull surgeon, apothecary and alderman, was refused permission to stand down as alderman, even after agreeing to pay a fine of £75. Aged 65, he continued to attend Corporation meetings until his death in 1702. Had previously been Sheriff of Hull (1665) and Mayor twice (1660 and 1678).

On 16th May 1917, former Reckitt’s employeed Private Thomas Samuel Taylor was killed in action, serving with 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers. No known grave.

On 16th May 1941, one of the worst nights of bombing saw 57 dead in East Hull, including 50 in the Ellis Terrace air raid shelter, which took a direct hit. 20 others were injured in Holderness Road, Hedon Road and Alexandra Dock.

On 16th May 1952, Hammond’s new Ferensway store opened to replace the building bombed during WW2. In the ’Celebration offers’, oak dining tables were on sale for £7 10s. photo shows the old building during the war.hammonds blitz

 

May 15th

FlambroughOn 15th May 1498, Robert Barker of Wistow, near Selby claimed sanctuary at Beverley’s  church of St John, for the murder of John Towree at Wistow on 9th May.

On 15th May 1591, priest Robert Thorpe, and Thomas Watkinson were executed at York – Thorpe being hanged, drawn and quartered for treason, and Watkinson hanged as a felon for harbouring priests. Both were arrested at Menthorpe on Palm Sunday, when neighbours saw palms being taken into Watkinson’s house, by the local magistrate John Gates.

On 15th May 1613, Lady Grissell Clifford, Countess of Cumberland, died, aged 54 at Londesborough. She appears to have been generous to the local poor, and almost the entire female populations of Londesborough and Shipton attended her funeral. Memorial in Londesbrough church.

On 15th May 1618, Phillip Constable of Wassand Hall was killed in a duel at White Cross, Leven, by Edmund (or Edward) Percy. Constable buried in Goxhill. Difficult to verify any details, except that Philip Constable died in 1618, and that duels were considered a foreign introduction at the time.

On 15th May 1896, a temporary dam created during building work for the Fish Dock extension, Hull, burst, and the sudden rush of water smashed and sank the fishing smack Young Greg.

On 15th May 1951, motor mechanic Edward Slaughter, of the Flambrough lifeboat crew, was awarded an RNLI bronze medal and Mrs Porter’s Award (given annually for the bravest deed of the year by a lifeboat man). A boy was badly injured falling 150 feet from the Flambrough cliffs, and E.S. swam to him, got him on to a stretcher and guided the stretcher to the cliff top.