June 14th

On 14th June 1505, Thomas Wryght, husbandman of Hull, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley; the register does not state for what offence he was being pursued.

On 14th June 1702, the congregation of Cottingham church raised 8s 1/4d in a collection for the repair of St Germain’s church at Selby.

On 14th June 1772, John Robinson, yeoman and Susannah Evans, spinster, both of Skipsea, left Susannah’s 3-year-old illegitimate daughter on a dungheap in Gransmoor to die. Robinson was fined, to remain in gaol until the fine was paid; Evans’ sentence appears to have been 2 weeks on bread and water in prison, the crime described in the court record as a ‘misdemeanour’. (Presumably, the child was severely ill, injured and/or disabled if she remained where she was put).

Beverley Minster

June 9th

On 9th June 1786, a servant of Rev George Lambert of Hull gave notice that she was leaving after living with the family for 15 years, to live with a sailor who had recently sold his wife to another man. Most people considered this equivalent to divorce, although it had no status in law.

On 9th June 1888, a water spout in Langtoft sucked up mud and stones, and removed the soil from gardens, leaving bare chalk, as it moved across the local valleys. When it was halted by a steep hill, it deposited debris to the depth of 7 feet.

On 9th June 1965, Leslie Anthony Wegg was born in Hedon Road Maternity Hospital, Hull, with a full caul. A fisherman’s son, it was kept as a precious possession, despite a £100 offer to buy it. (from Eric Gill’s book “Superstitions’)

 

June 3rd

On 3rd June 1642, a few weeks after being refused entry into Hull, King Charles I called a meeting of the Yorkshire gentry at Heworth Moor, near York, and 70,000 attended. 200 young men volunteered to form a bodyguard for the King. The 2 Hilyard brothers of Winestead, Henry and Robert, attended, and volunteered. Many other ER people must also have attended.

On 3rd June 1717, Thomas Watson died aged 80. Born in Hull, he was created Bishop of St David’s, and in 1707 built almshouses in North Church Side. Supported James II in 1688. He lost his ecclesiastical offices in 1699 for selling church property or offices, and reputedly died a rich man. (b 1.3.1637) The picture shows the almshouses.

On 3rd June 1801, when their husbands were killed by the Danes in a military engagement off Copenhagen, the widows of Matthew Cobb and James Davis, Humber pilots, were given financial support by Hull Trinity House at 10s 6d per week, 6 weeks and 4 weeks respectively.

 

Bishop Watson's Hospital

May 30th

On 30th May 1778, Frank Slaiter returned to work at Escrick Hall 4 ½ months after breaking his thigh at work. His employer, Beilby Thompson, paid his medical fees, and gave him an allowance of 2/3 his normal wage while he was off sick.

On 30th May 1782, Rev George Lambert and Mr Towers began a journey to London with a ferry crossing of the Humber, which took 3 hours; it took from 11a.m. to the evening to reach Lincoln by coach. They arrived in London about 50 hours after leaving Hull. This was probably typical for the time.

On 30th May 1820, William Bradley died aged 33 of tuberculosis in  Market Weighton. Known as the Yorkshire Giant, he grew to 7’9”. Travelled with shows and fairs, and later charged visitors to his home. Was presented to King George III. (b 10.2.1787)

On 30th May 1859, a Hull Coroner’s Court jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against Isabella Hewson.  On 27.5 she had hanged her son, aged 2, and then gave herself up to police. No evidence of insanity was found on medical examination.

On 30th May 1912, Brigadier Mark Sykes inspected the Yorkshire Catholic Reformatory, Market Weighton, and found lack of discipline, bullying, filth, poor food, lack of fire precautions and drill, and poor medical treatment. Recommended all staff but one be dismissed. The management of the school was changed later that year.

 

Yorks reformatory

 

 

 

 

 

May 28th

On 28th May 1554, Beverley priest Robert Thwenge was brought before judges at York for the 4th time on the charge that he had been an ordained priest and had afterwards married. He had married after the Reformation, but before Queen Mary repealed the Act. He said that he would rather continue with his wife, and did not wish to be restored as a minister. The record does not show what happened to him after this. Most priests agreed to separate from their wives and retain their livings after doing penance for their sin.

On 28th May 1721, Ann Watson, widow, of Stoneferry, was buried in St Augustine’s Church, Hedon. She bequeathed her whole estate at Stoneferry to charitable uses. Memorial in the church to the Watson family, including her son Hedon Watson.

On 28th May 1787, Edmund Foster, carver and gilder start a sale of his stock in trade at the Golden Boy, Lowgate, Hull. The sale was expected to last 28 days (not including Sundays). The stock included chimney pieces, gilded looking glasses and ornaments. An early ‘everything must go/closing down’ sale?

On 28th May 1857, Charles Francis Annesley Voysey was born, son of Rev Charles Voysey. Designer in the Arts and Crafts style and architect, winner of RIBA Gold Medal 1940. (d 12.2.1941)

 

Ann Watson memorial