August 4th

On 4th August 1511, John Hessey, husbandman of Belby, nr Howden, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of William Smyth of Didyngham (anyone know where this is?)

On 4th August 1652, Keyingham manor court fined 18 villagers for allowing their geese and pigs into the fields outside the stipulated times.

On 4th August 1795, Hull residents rioted against inflationary food prices and shortages. Much corn was being taken by the army, (Napoleonic Wars) in a year of poor weather. A few windows broken.

On 4th August 1834, John Venn, was born in Drypool, son of the vicar. Left Hull at age 8. Fellow of the Royal Society, famous mathematician, who introduced the Venn diagram. Commemorated in Hull University by the Venn Building. (d 4.4.1923) and by Drypool Bridge.

On 4th August 1851, G. Hought of Hutton Cranswick was killed by lightning, as he sheltered under a tree during a thunderstorm. He left a wife and 2 children.

On 4th August 1884, all 11 Walgate brothers of Aldbrough formed one cricket team in a match held at Rise Hall; the Walgates won the match by 3 wickets.

On 4th August 1969, HM Queen Elizabeth opened Queen Elizabeth Dock, the last major dock to be opened in Hull, accompanied by HRH Duke of Edinburgh and Princess Anne.

 

Drypool Bridge

July 27th

On 27th July 1643, Hull widow Ann Stevenson, whose husband died at Beverley in Parliament’s service as a cannoneer, petitioned the town of Hull to pay her the 35 shillings wages due to him; the committee agreed, in view of her poverty, to let her have 20s.

On 27th July 1782, Rev George Lambert of Fish Street, Hull reported in his diary on a violent thunderstorm in the evening, and lightning killed a cow very near their house, and scorched the hedges.

On 27th July 1796, jockey George Heron was thrown by his horse at Hull racecourse, Newington, and killed.

On 27th July 1855, James McLoughlin, aged 13, asked Hull Magistrates Court for the protection of the court on account of his mother having beaten him severely with a stick and a fire poker because he would not go out stealing for her.

On 27th July 1996, HMS Rose visited Hull’s Albert Dock; this was an exact replica of a frigate built in Hull by the Blaydes yard in 1757 and sunk in Savannah, Georgia in 1779. The only difference from the original ship was that the sails were made from recycled plastic bottles.

HMS Rose replica

July 24th

On 24th July 1614, Ralph Hansby founded almshouses for 3 poor persons at Bishop Burton.

On 24th July 1622, Lawrence Taylor, rector of Londesborough,  died intestate, and the York Consistory (Ecclesiastical) Court gave custody of his 6 children, and a 7thchild born in October, to his brother William, to be supported until age 21. No information on the fate of his widow.

On 24th July 1894, John William Russell was shot dead on Albert Dock, Hull, by Arthur Kendall. Russell was trying to defend Crossland from Kendall. Kendall was convicted at York Assizes, his sentence commuted to penal servitude.

On 24th July 1912, a heavy cloudburst over Westwood brought flooding to Beverley town centre. Water was a foot deep on Walkergate.

On 24th July 1942, bus inspector Ernest Goddard, aged 50, and 14 others, including 5 children, were killed in an air raid on Withernsea; as well as 2 bombs, in Queen Street and the bowling green, the German Dornier bomber had used small arms fire on local people.

On 24th July 2011, 5 thieves stole the 300kg statue from Nelson Street, Hull; called Voyage, the statue was created by Steinunn Thorarinsdottir, as a symbol of the relationship between Hull and Iceland.  A replacement statue was unveiled 11.5.2012.

iceland statue plinth.JPGphoto shows the empty plinth.

July 16th

On 16th July 1796, 10 days after the introduction of the Dog Tax of 5s per dog per year, the Hull Advertiser reported a considerable number of rotting dog carcases, after owners killed their dogs and threw them in the street.

On 16th July 1802, Dorothy Wordsworth, sister of poet William, visited Beverley with friends, commenting on the beauty of the town and the minster.

On 16th July 1807, a Bastardy examination of Ann Linwood, single woman of Hedon
revealed that the father of her son, born on 28 Jun 1807 in Hull was gunsmith Owen Probin. Owen Probin was murdered 7 years later (the events are probably not related).

On 16th July 1885, Hull & Barnsley Railway and the Alexandra Dock officially opened.

On 16th July 1904, the Beverley Guardian reported a new phenomenon, ‘the hatless brigade’, when pedestriansof both sexes had been seen in Hornsea without any head covering whatsoever.minster beverley.JPG

July 12th

On 12th July 1537, Robert Aske of Aughton was hanged in chains outside Cliffords Tower, York, after being convicted of treason in Westminster, as the leader of the Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 12th July 1641, Sir Thomas Glemham resigned his post as Governor of Hull, having only been appointed the previous year.

On 12th July 1714, Elizabeth Hodgson, a single woman of Hedon, was sentenced at Hedon Quarter Sessions to be stripped to the waist and whipped with birch or willows from the Town Hall to Harrison Lane and from there to the jail and to remain in jail at hard labour until ‘sufficient security’ was found for her good behaviour. Her crime was to give birth to her 4thillegitimate child. There is no record of any punishment for the father. An Act of 1792 forbade whipping females for any reason whatsoever.

On 12th July 1826, (in one of the driest summers on record) Hessle banker Joseph Robinson Pease recorded in his diary there was no grass for the cattle, who had to be given linseed cake. Ponds and water tanks dry.  Around this time, too, the pond at Fridaythorpe dried up, and villagers went on a Sunday to nearby Fimber to take water from one of their 2 ponds, resulting in a pitched battle, referred to as ‘the Second Battle of Waterloo’. photo shows the remaining village pond at Fimber.

fimber pond.JPG

June 26th

On 26th June 1793, Captain William Hammond died aged 65 in Kirk Ella. Hull sea captain, shipowner and merchant, supporter of abolition, Chairman of Hull Dock Company, Warden of Trinity House, and diplomat. (He and David Hartley MP met Benjamin Franklin and John Adams in Paris on a possible spying mission) Buried in Welton. (b 1727 York). Photo shows a door in the Maritime Museum, former Dock Offices.

On 26th June 1854, at an event to celebrate the opening of the Hull-Withernsea railway line, 500 guests travelled from Hull on the first ever train (which was 20 minutes late, due to late arrival of guests) and part of the lunch marquee collapsed; there were no injuries. Joseph Robinson Pease in his diary recorded heavy showers and high winds threatened to tear the marquee to pieces, but that it subsided and all passed off well.

On 26th June 1920, the National Federation of Women Workers called its Hull laundry worker members out on strike, as they were paid less than in other towns. Hull Trades Council supported the strike and organised a parade on 17 July. Strike breakers were reported being smuggled in to work in laundry baskets.

Hull Dock Co

June 23rd

Ezekiel Rogers window

Ezekiel Rogers window, Rowley church.

On 23rd June 1660, Reverend Ezekiel Rogers died aged 70, in Rowley, Massachusetts, after 22 years as vicar of a new Puritan settlement.  The new town was named after Rowley in East Yorkshire, from where he led a group of about 100 Puritans to America in June 1638. Became Rector of Rowley in 1621, aged 31, and served there for 17 years. (b 1590 in Wethersfield, Essex)

On 23rd June 1766, Sara Jenkinson, the infant daughter of Richard Jenkinson of Hutton Cranswick, fell from a little girl’s arms and died within 30 minutes. There was a coroner’s inquest.

On 23rd June 1768, John Courtney, aged 34, gentleman, of Beverley, married Mary Jesse Smelt, aged 24, at St Mary’s, Lowgate. The bride dressed in a white ‘night gown’ and white hat, the groom in a white suit. Only family and servants attended the church and family members dined with them afterwards. The bells of both churches rang for them. They returned to their future home in Beverley in the evening. In his diary, John refers to his future wife at all times as ‘Miss Smelt’.

On 23rd June 1787, the Clerk to the Beverley to Driffield Turnpike Trust wrote to T. Baxter, the owner of Bell Mills, Sunderlandwick, threatening him with prosecution if he allowed anyone to cross his land to avoid paying tolls. 2 months later the Trust asked T. Baxter to lock the gate near his mill, and to prosecute anyone who broke it down.

On 23rd June 1812, Major-General Barnard Foord Bowes of Cowlam was wounded at Battle of Badajoz, but recovered to fight at Salamanca.

On 23rd June 1848, Uckaluk died of measles aboard the Hull ship Truelove, on their way home to Nyadlik, Greenland. She and her husband Memiadluk had visited England to highlight the poor conditions in their homeland.  They took part in talks in Manchester and York. 

On 23rd June 1853, Captain John (or Thomas) Bowlby set sail for Cumberland Sound in the Arctic with 3 ships, with the aim of forming a settlement there; they took goats and building materials. The surgeon on the trip was William Gedney, who had been on board the Truelove with Captain Parker in 1847.

On 23rd June 1898, Winifred Holtby was born at Rudston. Social reformer, novelist and journalist, she was famous and respected for her work in South Africa and elsewhere. ‘South Riding’ became her most famous novel, published after her death. She is buried in Rudston. (d 29.9.1935)